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Archives for September 1999

Horn Book Reminiscence from Lee Kingman

By Lee Kingman My earliest memory of Bertha Mahony, before she added Miller to her name, begins with her feet. Small feet, proportioned to her small frame. As I was a lanky nine-year-old, I was almost as tall as she was. Her lack of size, however, had nothing to do with her authority, which was […]

Realms of Gold and Granite

The Bookshop for Boys and Girls was born, in a twelvemonth, with a pedigree and a distinguished list of patrons. Its role was largely determined from the outset. But life, real life, is also a string of accidents. Bertha Mahony was thirty-three and restless after ten years as a good right-hand at Boston’s Women’s Educational […]

The Bookshop for Boys and Girls

In the beginning, there was retail. In 1916, when there were no superstores, no thought of Internet shopping, and few notable children’s books for sale anywhere, the founding editor of the Horn Book, Bertha Mahony, opened a new bookshop in Boston. The Bookshop for Boys and Girls “Realms of Gold and Granite” by Barbara Bader […]

Horn Book Reminiscence from Elizabeth Orton Jones

by Elizabeth Orton Jones Tchrr-r-r-r! The phone would ring. I’d answer, and after a considerable while I’d hear a faint little quavery voice, as if someone were calling me from beyond the Pleiades…“E-li-i-izabeth?” It would be my dear friend Bertha Mahony Miller, calling from Ashburnham, Massachusetts, about seventeen miles from Mason, New Hampshire, where I […]

Horn Book Reminiscence from Lee Kingman

By Lee Kingman My earliest memory of Bertha Mahony, before she added Miller to her name, begins with her feet. Small feet, proportioned to her small frame. As I was a lanky nine-year-old, I was almost as tall as she was. Her lack of size, however, had nothing to do with her authority, which was […]

Realms of Gold and Granite

The Bookshop for Boys and Girls was born, in a twelvemonth, with a pedigree and a distinguished list of patrons. Its role was largely determined from the outset. But life, real life, is also a string of accidents. Bertha Mahony was thirty-three and restless after ten years as a good right-hand at Boston’s Women’s Educational […]

Horn Book Reminiscence from Isabel Wilner

From Isabel Wilner My acquaintance with the Horn Book began when I entered Carnegie Library School in Pittsburgh in September 1944. Our classrooms were located in the library itself, and it was there that I discovered bound volumes of the Horn Book, which I enjoyed reading for my personal pleasure whenever time permitted. Elizabeth Nesbitt […]

Horn Book Reminiscences From Jill Paton Walsh and John Rowe Townsend

From Jill Paton Walsh and John Rowe Townsend Paul Heins was a Bostonian born and bred: a perfect Bostonian gentleman. (He was not a Boston Brahmin, but then, you do not have to be a Brahmin to be a gentleman.) Ethel was a New Englander by adoption. Together they seemed to our British eyes to […]

Horn Book reminiscence from Jane Manthorne

From Jane Manthorne My association with The Horn Book Magazine and children’s books goes back more than fifty years. Recollections abound of encounters with the unexpected, the ridiculous, the bizarre, and — most often — thoughtful meetings with staff, authors, and books. My predilection in life and libraries and literature has always been for the […]

The Horn Book League

“The Horn Book League . . . , like the St. Nicholas League after which it was modeled and whose motto it bore, . . . was made up of artwork, poems, and essays sent in by boys and girls. The first column appeared in the March-April 1949 Horn Book under a headpiece designed by Hilda van Stockum, an […]