>Maybe they were on to something,

>those YA writers
who made
spareness of line
look like
poetry.

The company Live Ink believes this in fact is a more efficient way to read prose. Look here to see what they’ve done with Moby-Dick.

share save 171 16 >Maybe they were on to something,
Roger Sutton About Roger Sutton

Roger Sutton has been the editor in chief of The Horn Book, Inc, since 1996. He was previously editor of The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books and a children's and young adult librarian. He received his M.A. in library science from the University of Chicago in 1982 and a B.A. from Pitzer College in 1978. Follow him on Twitter: @RogerReads.

Comments

  1. Andy Laties says:

    >Makes my eyes water.

    I’ll take the Barry Moser “Moby Dick”, thanks.

  2. Sylvia Vardell says:

    >What a fascinating notion– that the presentation of text in “cascading phrases” can make something more readable, more understandable– and suddenly poetry. I’m not sure I agree, but it certainly is intriguing, particularly in this text-filled medium of online reading. It seems to me that the novelty of it is part of the appeal. If all text were presented this way, then unbroken lines of language might seem refreshing! Interesting stuff, any way you slice it. Thanks for sharing.
    Sylvia

  3. Chris Barton says:

    >Mock if you like, but sports reporting has never before touched me quite like that New Jersey Blues story:

    I felt good

    I had control

    And then wham
    … they just crushed it.

  4. Anonymous says:

    >Isn’t this just Frog and Toad for grown-ups?

    h

  5. Monica Edinger says:

    >Does it help with politician speech?

    I’m not
    in favor
    of his religion
    by any means
    But
    he wrote a book
    called
    ‘Battlefield Earth’
    that
    was
    a
    very
    fun
    science-fiction book.

  6. Anonymous says:

    >think of the paper costs to a publisher! or will they now print on adding-machine tape?

  7. shahairyzad says:

    >How do they do poetry?

    “so

    much

    de
    pends

    up
    on

    a

    red

    wheel
    bar
    row

    glazed

    with

    rain

    wat

    er

    be

    side

    the

    white
    chick

    ens.”

  8. Anonymous says:

    >I found it intriguing, so went from the samples to the explanations. I quickly noticed that most of the conventionally formatted information was white type on black backgrounds, one of the very worst ways to read, print or screen. I suddenly couldn’t help but wonder if they were trying to induce temporary eyestrain so when you get to the samples they read better simply because your eyes have ceased to spasm.

  9. rindawriter says:

    >I do think
    Without a blink

    It’s all due
    Entirely to

    Website words
    Edited by nerds

    Who can’t rhyme
    In metered time

    Or catch a star
    With metaphor.

    Yes, yes, yes….doggerel, I know, but isn’t it so much more fun to read….what do you expect for three minutes’ work? Poetry?

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