>and someday Man will walk on the Moon

>Interesting discussion on the ALSC-L listserv: they are discussing what to do with Judith St. George and David Small’s So You Want to Be President, which, last revised in 2004, includes the statement that “no person of color has been President.” On the one hand it is dated and inaccurate; on the other, the original edition (ending with Bill Clinton) won the 2001 Caldecott Medal. What trumps what?

In any case, Scottie Bowditch at Penguin tells me that a revised edition (with some new pics as well) is due out next January.

share save 171 16 >and someday Man will walk on the Moon
Roger Sutton About Roger Sutton

Roger Sutton has been the editor in chief of The Horn Book, Inc, since 1996. He was previously editor of The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books and a children's and young adult librarian. He received his M.A. in library science from the University of Chicago in 1982 and a B.A. from Pitzer College in 1978. Follow him on Twitter: @RogerReads.

Comments

  1. >Your title is the key phrase I used for many years when weeding. I was astonished how often it appeared in all sorts of books.
    My take? Keep the older edition till the new one comes out.

  2. KT Horning says:

    >We had an even worse weed from the 730s at MPL: "Asbestos makes wonderful molding clay for children."

  3. >I love it when I find a good/scary/funny title (let alone content) while weeding. Last week I found two winners: "Quaaludes", from the early 80s (now that kids are snorting bath salts, this title seemed so innocent and straightforward); and "Why the Chinese are the Way They Are" from the 60s.

  4. Ms. Yingling says:

    >This is probably a title that should be replaced with the newer version. My favorite weeded book… "All About Radio and Television"… from 1958!

  5. Lyle Blake Smythers says:

    >As many of you will know, here at the Library of Congress there is an ongoing process of revising the terms found in Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH for short) to make them accurate and up-to-date. Sometimes the changes can be viewed as falling into the category of political correctness. Two changes that spring to mind that happened during my time as a cataloger were changing Afro-Americans to African Americans and changing Moving pictures to Motion pictures.

    One type of heading that has always intrigued me is the "[topic] question" heading. Examples: Jewish question, Currency question, and Eastern question (Far East). I had one outraged coworker who used to huff and say indignantly, "What does that mean? What exactly is the question?" To which the only appropriate response is, "What is the question indeed?"

    Lyle Blake Smythers

  6. >I'm pretty sure the Jewish question is "Why is this night different from all other nights?"

    What I want to know is, why ARE the Chinese "the way they are"? :-)

  7. Roger Sutton says:

    >If an edition is revised, especially if it has new pics,is it allowed to wear the Caldecott sticker?

  8. Adelene Smith says:

    >Can not wait to see more people on the moon.

  9. Jennifer Schultz says:

    >"If an edition is revised, especially if it has new pics,is it allowed to wear the Caldecott sticker?"

    That's interesting. Have you found an answer?

  10. Debbie Reese says:

    >Ok… so what about all the "non-fiction" that erroneously says American Indians were primitive, savage, etc?

  11. Roger Sutton says:

    >I'd chuck it.

  12. Debbie Reese says:

    >Be still my heart!

  13. Roger Sutton says:

    >Of course though, Deb, you will still have to tear the copies of the Little House books from my cold, dead hands. ;-)

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