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Archives for July 2011

Gardening with The Lorax

As the public becomes increasingly worried by climate change and deforestation, Dr. Seuss’s The Lorax, originally published in 1971, may be more relevant than ever before. With its unforgettable characters and sentiment, the classic is an entertaining and informative way of introducing young children to environmental issues. Unfortunately, The Lorax Garden app (Oceanhouse Media, April […]

Upcoming stars

Starred reviews appearing in the September/October Horn Book Magazine: – The Haunted Hamburger and Other Ghostly Stories by David LaRochelle; illus. by Paul Meisel (Dutton) – A Ball for Daisy by Chris Raschka (Schwartz & Wade) – Dead End in Norvelt by Jack Gantos (Farrar) – Secrets at Sea by Richard Peck; illus. by Kelly […]

>Word order

>The Boston Globe’s thumbnail review for Captain America says the movie “packs a powerful, but predictable, patriotic punch.” How is that different from saying that it “packs a predictable, but powerful, patriotic punch?” I’m curious about which construction you all think is the more positive, because this is a trick reviewers use all the time, […]

Erin E. Stead (2011 Caldecott profile by Philip C. Stead)

We had no intention of bringing a dog home that day. Erin just needed cheering up, and what better way than rows and rows of wagging tails at the Baltimore SPCA? I was in town from Ann Arbor visiting Erin for the weekend. But our visit had been sidetracked when the phone rang. It was […]

September/October starred reviews

The following books will receive starred reviews in the September/October issue of the Horn Book Magazine. The Haunted Hamburger and Other Ghostly Stories by David LaRochelle; illus. by Paul Meisel (Dutton) A Ball for Daisy by Chris Raschka (Schwartz & Wade) Dead End in Norvelt by Jack Gantos (Farrar) Secrets at Sea by Richard Peck; […]

Queen of the fake-out

“Nothing in Rosewood is ever really over,” reads the first page of Twisted (Harper Teen, July), the ninth book in Sara Shepard’s Pretty Little Liars series. No kidding. Back in 2006, the Horn Book Guide’s review of the kick-off volume refers to Pretty Little Liars as the “first book in a planned series of four” […]

New voices speak up

YA librarian and current Boston Globe–Horn Book Award judge Robin Brenner hosts a panel of “New Voices in YA and Children’s Literature” tonight, July 20th. The up-and-coming authors—all recent grads of the Simmons MFA in Writing for Children program, including HB freelancers Natasha Gilmore and Shara Hardeson—will read from their work, then discuss their process […]

The ones that got away: Vera B. Williams

What book do you think most deserved to win the Newbery or Caldecott and didn’t even get an Honor? “The 1989 Caldecott Committee righted one wrong by honoring James Marshall (Goldilocks and the Three Bears), but they overlooked another work of genius, Vera B. Williams and Jennifer Williams’s Stringbean’s Trip to the Shining Sea (1988). […]

>Marvin Redpost v. Stanley Yelnats

>This Guardian article about authors famous for the wrong book has me turning children’s authors and titles over in my head. I do think Paula Fox’s best book is One-Eyed Cat, not The Slave Dancer or Desperate Characters. I like Lois Lowry’s Autumn Street more than The Giver, and Hilary McKay’s The Exiles has it […]

>Harry 76.5

>Kazia Berkley-Cramer reviews the new Harry Potter movie over at Out of the Box. We just watched the first part of Deathly Hallows on TV the other night and I am still a little confused about the Horcruxes. Richard wanted to know why Voldemort and Harry were enemies, so I was at least glad to […]