Upcoming October 28th

HarrisBurdick Upcoming October 28thI’ll be moderating a panel with Chris Van Allsburg, Lois Lowry, and Margaret Raymo about The Chronicles of Harris Burdick, reviewed and excerpted in the September/October issue of the Horn Book Magazine. The event is at the Harvard Bookstore*, who I will forgive for calling me a “children’s book editor.” (I don’t know who they are, either.)  It’s five bucks–how do you feel about fee-based book signings?

 

*Clarification: the event is actually at the Brattle Theater, down the street from the Harvard Bookstore, which is sponsoring the event.

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Roger Sutton About Roger Sutton

Roger Sutton has been the editor in chief of The Horn Book, Inc, since 1996. He was previously editor of The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books and a children's and young adult librarian. He received his M.A. in library science from the University of Chicago in 1982 and a B.A. from Pitzer College in 1978. Follow him on Twitter: @RogerReads.

Comments

  1. Nobody likes being charged for something we’re used to getting for free, but paying to see and hear authors in person might be one way said authors will be able to feed themselves if digital books continue to become cheaper, more widespread, and more easily lifted than print copies. That said, authors would be under pressure to make those events worth the added cost, changing the nature of a “reading.” Bookstores might have to refashion themselves as lyceums.

  2. Roger Sutton Roger Sutton says:

    In this case, at least, I don’t think it’s the author getting the money but the bookstore. Maybe to pay/defray the space rental? Crowd control?

    • Yes, in this case I believe the Harvard Book Store has to pay for space at the cinema. The store’s been charging for high-attendance author events like this for years. And our expectations that authors (and friendly editors) appear at those events for free means that it can keep costs low. I’m not convinced that expectation can survive if publishing economics keep changing as they have.

  3. Harvard Book Store gives you a $5 store credit in exchange for your $5 admission fee. I think they just want to make sure they get some business out of the reading, which seems entirely reasonable to me.

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