Page-turners for older readers

From comedy to ghost story, from a modern-day historical reenactment village to a future New York, these new middle-grade and YA novels range wildly in genre and setting. What do these books have in common? Readers won’t be able to put them down before the last gripping page.

1132269831 Page turners for older readersThe first book in Maureen Johnson’s Shades of London series, The Name of the Star is an eerie, absorbing mystery. Louisiana high-school senior Rory arrives in London amidst a series of gruesome murders precisely following Jack the Ripper’s modus operandi. After a near-death experience and sightings of people her boarding school classmates can’t see, Rory falls in with an underground group investigating a possible paranormal explanation for the murders. (12 years and up)

PastPerfect Page turners for older readersChelsea, protagonist of Leila Sales’s Past Perfect, works as a living history interpreter at Colonial Essex Village. This summer, the boy who broke Chelsea’s heart is also working at Essex Village, and a bitter rivalry rages with Civil War Reenactmentland across the street. Complicating matters further, Chelsea traitorously falls for a cute Civil War interpreter. Her acerbically funny narration balances thoughtful meditations on the nature of history, memory, and love. (14 years and up)

legend Page turners for older readersDay is one of the totalitarian Republic’s most wanted criminals; June has a personal vendetta against him. When their paths cross by chance, June — unaware of Day’s true identity — is attracted to his good looks, charm, and courage. In trilogy opener Legend, Marie Lu crafts a dystopian world rife with inequality and rebellion, with personal dynamics complicated by romance and betrayal. Fans of The Hunger Games will be hooked. (12 years and up)

allthesethings Page turners for older readersGabrielle Zevin’s All These Things I’ve Done is another dystopian tale of star-crossed lovers: Anya Balanchine is the daughter of a slain crime boss; Win Delacroix is the son of the ambitious assistant district attorney. Their New York — a city of crime, coffee speakeasies (caffeine and chocolate, the Balanchine family business, are illegal), and government ineptitude — could be set in the Prohibition era, but it’s 2083. This first volume of the Birthright series offers a romance as rich as chocolate. (12 years and up)

From Notes from the Horn Book, November 2011

share save 171 16 Page turners for older readers
Katie Bircher About Katie Bircher

Katie Bircher, assistant editor at The Horn Book, Inc., is a former bookseller and holds an MA in children's literature from Simmons College.

Comment Policy:
  1. Be respectful, and do not attack the author or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  2. Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  3. Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.

We are not able to monitor every comment that comes through (though some comments with links to multiple URLs are held for spam-check moderation by the system). If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.

We accept clean XHTML in comments, but don't overdo it and please limit the number of links submitted in your comment. For more info, see the full Terms of Use.

Trackbacks

  1. […] Page-turners for older readersBy Katie BircherFrom comedy to ghost story, from a modern-day historical reenactment village to a future New York, these new middle-grade and YA novels range wildly in genre and setting. What do these books have in common? Readers won’t be able to put them down before the last gripping page.The first book in Maureen Johnson’s Shades of London series, The Name of the Star is an eerie, absorbing mystery. Louisiana high-school senior Rory arrives in London amidst a series of gruesome murders precisely following Jack the Ripper’s modus operandi. After a near-death experience and sightings of people her boarding school classmates can’t see, Rory falls in with an underground group investigating a possible paranormal explanation for the murders. (12 years and up) Read More… […]

Speak Your Mind

*