“My Favorite Caldecott” matching game featuring Emily Arnold McCully

Photo courtesy Emily Arnold McCully

Emily Arnold McCully received the 1993 Caldecott Medal for Mirette on the High Wire, the story of a 19th-century Parisian girl who learns to walk the high wire and, in the process, helps her mentor overcome his fears. Which of the books below is the illustrator’s favorite Caldecott-winning picture book?

a) The Man Who Walked Between the Towers by Mordicai Gerstein (2004)
b) Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McCloskey (1942)
c) Ox-Cart Man written by Donald Hall and illustrated by Barbara Cooney (1980)

This post is part of our ongoing game matching Newbery and Caldecott medalists to their favorite winning titles. To see more entries, click on the tag matching game.

Previously: Neil Gaiman, Erin E. Stead, Lois Lowry, Linda Sue Park, Beth Krommes, Susan Cooper, Jerry Pinkney, Paul O. Zelinsky, Russell Freedman, and Sharon Creech.

Coming soon: David Wiesner, Robin McKinley, and Laura Amy Schlitz.

Illustration by Devon Johnson

Horn Book at Simmons Colloquium: Transformations
SummerTeen On October 2-3 2015, join an esteemed group of award-winning authors, illustrators, librarians, and other children’s book experts and aficionados in Boston, MA, for a memorable two-day event celebrating the best in children’s and young adult literature. Confirmed speakers include 2015 BOSTON GLOBE HORN–BOOK AWARD recipients Candace Fleming, Marla Frazee, Jon Agee, Gregory Maguire, and Neal Shusterman, plus a special keynote appearance by Susan Cooper.


  1. Sam Bloom says:

    I’m going to go with the upset and say Man Who Walked… is her favorite. And I’m excited to actually be guessing before the fact this time, since I’ve been late on all the other ones!

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