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Brave girls in audiobooks

These audiobooks starring brave and resilient female protagonists will appeal to middle-grade fans of historical fiction featuring strong and lively young women. March is Women’s History Month. See also our Five Questions interview with Laurie Halse Anderson and the “Strong women making an impact 2019” section in this issue of Notes from the Horn Book; […]

Embracing friendship and community

The following picture books provide models for warmth, friendship, community-building, and inclusivity in ways that very young children can understand and embrace. David Soman’s inviting How to Two is a counting book that could also serve as a set of inclusivity instructions. A lone boy plays on a slide (“how to one”); when he joins […]

Strong women making an impact 2019

For Women’s History Month, here are four new memoirs and biographies of women who have made a lasting impact in their respective fields. See also our Five Questions interview with Laurie Halse Anderson in this issue; our list of new picture-book bios; the tag women’s history; and KidLitWomen* for more stories of amazing and inspirational […]

Five questions for Julie Danielson of Calling Caldecott

In 2017, Calling Caldecott welcomed Julie Danielson to the team. Along with Martha Parravano and Lolly Robinson, Jules — author of the Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast blog — stays up-to-date on the 2018 Caldecott contenders, offering entertaining observations and useful insight into the awards selection process. 1. How has your first year of Calling […]

Five questions for Deborah Noyes

In The Magician and the Spirits: Harry Houdini and the Curious Pastime of Communicating with the Dead (Viking, 11–14 years), Deborah Noyes homes in on the Spiritualist movement during the turn of the twentieth century (think séances, spirit photography, ectoplasm, etc.) — and on Harry Houdini’s efforts to debunk its claims. 1. What drew you […]

Five questions for Kate Klise and M. Sarah Klise

Sisters Kate and M. Sarah Klise created their first book together before either of them turned twelve! Since then, author Kate and illustrator Sarah have collaborated on many picture books and intermediate novels — all of which are seriously funny. Their newest picture book, Stay: A Girl, a Dog, a Bucket List (Feiwel, 5–8 years), […]

Five questions for Cynthia Levinson

In 2012, Cynthia Levinson published We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March. In telling the larger story of the civil rights movement, she focused on the lives and work of four African American young people. One of those people was Audrey Faye Hendricks, who at the age of nine was arrested as part […]

Five questions for Vera Brosgol

Vera Brosgol’s 2011 YA debut was Anya’s Ghost (Roaring Brook/First Second, 12–16 years), a graphic novel about a quirky friendship — between a girl and a ghost. Her first picture book, Leave Me Alone! (Roaring Brook, 5–8 years), has a similarly wry and witty tone and highlights a point of view not always seen in […]

Five questions for Antoinette Portis

Antoinette Portis won a Geisel Honor in 2007 for her picture book Not a Box (Harper, 3–6 years), a celebration of child’s imaginative vision over the skepticism that tends to creep in later in life. Her latest picture book Wait (Roaring Brook/Porter, 3–6 years) likewise encourages children — and their parents — to stop and […]

Five questions for Ann Bausum

Ann Bausum has written nonfiction about U.S. presidents and first ladies, muckrakers, Freedom Riders, suffragists, immigrants, and world wars. Her latest book Stonewall: Breaking Out in the Fight for Gay Rights (Viking, 11–15 years) focuses on the 1969 Stonewall riots, which helped kick things off (spectacularly; there was a kick-line) in NYC and galvanize the […]