Lolly Robinson

About Lolly Robinson

Lolly Robinson is the designer and production manager for The Horn Book, Inc. She has degrees in studio art and children's literature and teaches children's literature at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education. She has served on the Caldecott and Boston Globe-Horn Book Award committees and blogs for Calling Caldecott and Lolly's Classroom on this site.

Review of Winnie

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Winnie: The True Story of the Bear Who Inspired Winnie-the-Pooh by Sally M. Walker; illus. by Jonathan D. Voss Primary   Holt   32 pp. 1/15   978-0-8050-9715-3   $17.99 A real bear plays a part in Winnie-the-Pooh’s origin story: at the London Zoo, a bear named Winnie made such a strong impression on young Christopher Milne that he […]

Mock book award results | 2015

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My children’s lit students just met for the last time, and we spent most of our three-hour class in mock book award groups. I had been thinking about trying mock awards in this short six-week module for a few years, but this year Maleka Donaldson Gramling, the terrific course TF, thought it would be worth […]

Last children’s lit class in 2015

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It’s hard to believe that this half-semester module is finishing up in one week. Last night, students handed in their annotated bibliographies — the big written assignment in this course. Now we head into the last class for a little fun. We are reading Charlotte’s Web for dessert but most of our last meeting will […]

Charlotte’s Web | Class #6, 2015

Charlotte's Web

During our last class meeting, we will be holding four mock book award sessions. There are two Caldecott groups and one each for Geisel and Sibert. Check out the books they have nominated here and tell us which one would get your first vote. Charlotte’s Web has been my last class reading assignment for several […]

Mock book awards | Class #6, 2015

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During our last class, students will meet in mock award groups. I posted about this last week, but we’ve had some updates since then. We will follow the terms and criteria as outlined by the ALA/ALSC: Caldecott terms and criteria Geisel terms and criteria Sibert terns and criteria There are 5-7 students on each committee, […]

Join some mock award discussions

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Hello, Calling Caldecott readers. I want to alert you to a post that just went up in Lolly’s Classroom. My students will be holding mock award sessions during our last class on April 9. Come help them discuss these books here. Since there are nearly 30 students, we have four groups: two Caldecott committees, one […]

Mock book awards | Class #5, 2015

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This year, most of our last class meeting in Children’s Lit will be devoted to mock book awards. Each student selected a committee to join (Caldecott for picture books, Geisel for easy readers, or Sibert for information books) and chose one or two eligible books published in 2014 to nominate and present to his or […]

Folklore and poetry | Class #5, 2015

Folklore and poetry

For our class on April 2, we are reading four books and one article. I like combining these two genres because both need to be read aloud in order to really appreciate them. Folklore has to have a strong voice, as it comes from an oral tradition where storytellers have individual styles, just as today’s […]

Mrs. Chicken and the Hungry Crocodile | Class #5, 2015

Mrs. Chicken and the Hungry Crocodile

There are so many stand-alone folktale picture books that it’s hard to choose just one for us to read together. But I’ve used this one for several years because of its humor, voice, and authenticity. Interestingly, it also represents two story types: noodleheads (heroes or heroins who are a bit scatterbrained) and tricksters (a small […]

Glass Slipper, Gold Sandal | Class #5, 2015

Glass Slipper, Gold Sandal

One of the fascinating and mysterious things about folklore is that the same story types appear all over the world. Here’s a single picture book that tells a Cinderella-type story as found in several different cultures. I think children would need to first be familiar with a single, cohesive version of this story in order […]