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Where the Wild Things Are | Class #1 2016

where the wild things are

For our first class this year, we are again reading Where the Wild Things Are, a picture book that is now a classic, but was controversial in its day. Every year there are a handful of students who have never read this book. For those who know it well, I’m interested in hearing whether you […]

Mirror by Jeannie Baker | Class #1, 2016

mirror

Wordless books present an interesting challenge to adults who share them with children. Is there a right way to read them? The great children’s literature specialist Rudine Sims Bishop has written about books for children needing to be both windows and mirrors. This book seems to me to be the epitome of that idea. There’s […]

Who should we follow?

twitter bird

Now that Lauren’s adolescent lit class is over, I have a scant two weeks to put the finishing touches on my children’s lit module. Harvard has a new web tool, so I have to re-create my old links page from scratch, starting with social media recommendations. The problem is, I’m a bit of a dinosaur […]

The past made present | Class #3, 2016

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Next Tuesday (February 9), Lauren’s class will be discussing several books. The theme for the day is “The past made present” so they will look at both historical fiction and nonfiction — including one book that’s a hybrid of the two. Everyone will be reading One Crazy Summer; they will choose to read either No […]

Two historical fiction books | Class #3, 2016

One Crazy Summer

     One Crazy Summer by Rita Williams-Garcia Supplemental readings: Rita Williams-Garcia’s profile in July/August 2007 Horn Book Magazine No Crystal Stair: A Documentary Novel of the Life and Work of Lewis Michaux, Harlem Bookseller by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson; illustrated by R. Gregory Christie Historical fiction is a balancing act of storytelling and character development with […]

Windows and mirrors | Class #2, 2016

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Please join the adolescent lit class at HGSE as we discuss three recent YA books for our second class on February 2. The students are required to comment on one of the readings, but we hope any of you who have read one of these will want to join our discussion on these individual posts: […]

Adolescent lit class begins tomorrow

lockhart_we were liars

This year both the adolescent lit and children’s lit classes at Harvard Graduate School of Education (where I moonlight when I’m not designing, reviewing, and blogging here at the Horn Book) will be taught in the spring semester. That means we’re running them back-to-back and holding our book discussions out in the open with all […]

Hooray for Winnie!

mattick_finding winnie

I am thrilled that Finding Winnie won the Caldecott Medal. Even though I had looked at it closely when I posted about it here, the announcement prompted me to take another look. We’ll never know exactly why the Caldecott Committee chose it, but here are some aspects of the book that could have raised it […]

What do you think about the Caldecott winners?

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We will respond to the awards in more detail later, but for now here’s a short post so you can tell us what you think about the Real Committee’s choices. In case you don’t know, here they are: 2016 Caldecott Medal winner: Finding Winnie: The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear illustrated by […]

Live from ALA

MidwinterLogo

Greetings from Midwinter where the REAL Caldecott Medal winner will be announced tomorrow morning — along with all the other youth media awards. If you can’t be there in person, here is a link to the live webcast (Monday 1/11 at 8 a.m. EST). It’s been a treat having the conference in our own back […]