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Roger Sutton

About Roger Sutton

Roger Sutton has been the editor in chief of The Horn Book, Inc, since 1996. He was previously editor of The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books and a children's and young adult librarian. He received his M.A. in library science from the University of Chicago in 1982 and a B.A. from Pitzer College in 1978. Follow him on Twitter: @RogerReads.

Reading the waffle iron

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I see that Bad Little Children’s Books has been sent to bed without supper. No loss, even if I don’t share the outrage. There are some memes that should just stay memes, and children’s-book-cover parodies have been racing around since even before Buzzfeed was a thing. The problem with this collection in particular is there is almost zero wit; unlike […]

January/February 2017 Starred Reviews

from Fascinating; illustration by Edel Rodriguez

  The following books will receive starred reviews in the January/February 2017 issue of The Horn Book Magazine. Life on Mars; written and illustrated by Jon Agee (Dial). Chirri & Chirra; written and illustrated by Kaya Doi; translated from the Japanese by Yuki Kaneko (Enchanted Lion). Egg; written and illustrated by Kevin Henkes (Greenwillow). A […]

BGHB 2017

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… is beginning (yes, later than it should but earlier than it used to)! Please, publishers, start submitting your contenders; the eligibility period for the Boston Globe-Horn Book Awards runs from publishing date June 1st of this year to May 31st of next. It is never to soon to send books to the judges. I’m […]

Lynne Rae Perkins Talks with Roger

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Talks with Roger is a sponsored supplement to our free monthly e-newsletter, Notes from the Horn Book. To receive Notes, sign up here. Sponsored by For the education-minded among you, let me just say about Frank and Lucky Get Schooled that I don’t think I’ve seen more Core Standards introduced in a single book. And […]

Outside over there

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I hope you all had an enjoyable long weekend; we had a lovely Thanksgiving dinner with friends, saw two movies (Moonlight–wonderful; Allied–eh) and I fairly succesfully avoided thinking about work until Sunday afternoon when I began cranking on the editorial whose completion I am here prolonging as I have a dawdle with you. As promised, I […]

What will YOU be reading?

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Following  Shoshana’s lead, I’d like to wish you all a Happy Thanksgiving. My plan is to spend the long weekend reading as much as possible–under the direction of Richard (for whom I am very thankful), we have just finished a home renovation project that has added several new reading locations to our house, an array […]

Crawl into a cave with a book, maybe?

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Over on the Horn Book’s Family Reading blog, Kitty and Elissa are inviting you to share your stories about and strategies for helping children through what promises to be a difficult time for our country. Also see our latest booklist, “Making a Difference,” for some inspiration. I won’t pretend that I can think of anything […]

Three rules for successful book reviewing

Wait 'til you've refined it

The other day, I was tasked with delivering a PowerPoint about the Horn Book to our Media Source colleagues in Ohio and New York. Unfortunately for them, I had just watched the Imelda Staunton Gypsy on PBS this past weekend, and thus I had my gimmick, provided by the leading ladies of Wichita burlesque. Rule #1: […]

Caren Stelson Talks with Roger

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Talks with Roger is a sponsored supplement to our free monthly e-newsletter, Notes from the Horn Book. To receive Notes, sign up here. Sponsored by Sachiko Yasui was six years old on August 9, 1945, when “Fat Man” exploded over her city, Nagasaki, just over half a mile from where Sachiko was playing house with […]

Arrival spoilers

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The question is, how can I talk about Arrival without giving anything away? Well, go and come back, if you’ll allow me to allude to Joan Abelove’s 1998 novel (which I would love to see read through a lens of today’s conversations about social identity). And while you’re gone, re-read Shaun Tan’s The Arrival as […]