Authors & Illustrators

Biographical information about writers and illustrators of books for young people.

Remembering Trina Schart Hyman

hyman_snowwhite

November 19, 2014 marks the ten-year anniversary of the death of illustrator Trina Schart Hyman. Author/illustrator Jim Arnosky shares his memories of the Great Lady — what she meant to him as a mentor and as a friend. We are approaching ten years since the world of children’s literature lost Trina Schart Hyman. I still […]

Steampunk queen: An interview with Gail Carriger

carriger_waistcoats and weaponry

Gail Carriger introduced readers to her alternate Victorian London — chock-full of steampunk technology and supernatural characters — in 2009 with Soulless, the first volume of her five-book adult series The Parasol Protectorate. The Finishing School series, a YA prequel series set in the same world, soon followed, beginning with Curtsies & Conspiracies. Espionage lessons, […]

Cece Bell on El Deafo

eldeafo

In the November/December 2014 Horn Book Magazine, reviewer Deirdre Baker asked Cece Bell about her graphic novel memoir El Deafo — which is told entirely with anthropomorphic bunnies. Read the starred review here; see more grrl-power graphic novels here. Deirdre F. Baker: Why did you choose to tell your autobiography with bunny characters? Cece Bell: […]

Five questions for Sharon G. Flake

Photo: Richard Kelly

Is Mr. Davenport a vampire, as Octobia May insists? The answer is not so cut-and-dried in Sharon G. Flake’s Unstoppable Octobia May, a historical-fiction-cum-mystery-novel with more than a dash of social commentary (Scholastic, 9–12 years). From the 1950s boarding house setting to the vivid characters — some plucky, some humorous, some downright sinister — the […]

Girls in Towers

lengle_camilla

Madeleine L’Engle’s novel Camilla (titled Camilla Dickinson when first published in 1951 and recently reissued) features a bright and passionate fifteen-year-old who presents us with the essential question of the YA genre — how will this girl survive the emotional chaos of adolescence? In fairy tales, this same question is more logistical — how will […]

Monstrous Affections panel interview

link and grant_monstrous affections

When you meet an author you admire and he says, “Hi, I’m Tobin,” it might be best not to say, “I know! …Sorry, that’s probably creepy.” Luckily for me, M. T. Anderson and his Monstrous Affections: An Anthology of Beastly Tales colleagues — author/editors Kelly Link and Gavin Grant (who also own the mostly adult […]

#HBWhoSaidIt?

mork

November is Picture Book Month and National Novel Writing Month (or: NaNoWriMo, which, when said aloud, makes me think of Mork from Ork, may he rest in peace). To entertain and inspire — and facilitate procrastination — we’ve come up with a game of “Who Said It?” Every day we’ll tweet (from @HornBook) a quote […]

Boston Book Festival recap

hello mallory

The 2014 Boston Book Festival involved a lot of discussion of the boundaries between realism and fantasy. Somewhere along those boundaries, Curious George and Llama Llama paraded around Copley Square; Gregory Maguire sang in character as Baba Yaga; and my eight-year-old self grinned like a fool at her copy of Hello, Mallory, now signed, personalized, […]

Does YA Mean Anything Anymore?: Genre in a Digitized World – The Zena Sutherland Lecture

The Fault in our Stars

When we look to the astonishing growth of children’s books — especially YA books — in the last twenty years, we like to credit individuals — J. K. Rowling, for instance. But while it’s a kind of national obligation in the United States to praise individuals over collectives, I want to argue tonight that making […]

Five questions for Cary Elwes

As You Wishcover

On Friday, October 17, 2014, at 6:00 PM, Porter Square Books is hosting (at the Brattle Theatre) David Valdes Greenwood, in conversation with Cary Elwes, author of As You Wish. A Princess Bride screening follows the talk (screening begins at 8:30 PM). We asked Mr. Farmboy himself our Five Questions, to get in the “sexy […]