Authors & Illustrators

Biographical information about writers and illustrators of books for young people.

Five questions for Antoinette Portis

AntoinettePortis

Antoinette Portis won a Geisel Honor in 2007 for her picture book Not a Box (Harper, 3–6 years), a celebration of child’s imaginative vision over the skepticism that tends to creep in later in life. Her latest picture book Wait (Roaring Brook/Porter, 3–6 years) likewise encourages children — and their parents — to stop and […]

Transformers: But Myth Has No Prototype

cooper_oversea

Like many fantasy writers born and raised in Britain, I am haunted by Celtic and Arthurian myth; it goes with the territory. Even before I could read, I’d been shown the footprint of King Arthur’s horse up on the mountain above my grandmother’s village in Wales, and the mist that was the breath of the […]

Conference report: Association of Jewish Libraries 2015

aylesworth_mcclintock

While you wait with bated breath for next week’s ALA Annual conference — and the July/August Horn Book Magazine containing the Newbery, Caldecott, Coretta Scott King, and Wilder awards speeches and profiles of the winners, plus roundups of the year’s books, our Mind the Gap Awards for books that didn’t win at ALA, and more […]

7(.5) Totally Useless Questions for David Hyde Costello

lambert_crow of his own

After working the Horn Book booth at Saturday’s Hubbub Festival, I met up with David Hyde Costello, author/illustrator of Here They Come, I Can Help, and Little Pig Joins the Band before his scheduled event: a reading of his most recent illustrated work, A Crow of His Own (written by Megan Dowd Lambert). I could […]

Transformers: The Power of Storytelling

lester_john henry

I grew up in a small brick row house on a dead-end street in the Germantown section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In many ways, my neighborhood block in the 1940s was representative of African American culture as a whole: there were too many things we were told we could not do, too many places we might […]

Transformers: Ready or Not…

Lee_beauty and the beast

Translating Madame Villeneuve’s and Madame Leprince de Beaumont’s eighteenth-century French into contemporary American 
English for our picture book Beauty and the Beast was indeed a transformative event. In addition to the dramatic change in language, there were other differences, surprises brought on by time and the filter of many others before me. The process taught […]

Five questions for Ann Bausum

ann bausum

Ann Bausum has written nonfiction about U.S. presidents and first ladies, muckrakers, Freedom Riders, suffragists, immigrants, and world wars. Her latest book Stonewall: Breaking Out in the Fight for Gay Rights (Viking, 11–15 years) focuses on the 1969 Stonewall riots, which helped kick things off (spectacularly; there was a kick-line) in NYC and galvanize the […]

Transformers: Reimagining the World

lo_ash

Back in my late twenties, when I decided to finally, earnestly try to be a novelist, I chose to start with something I thought would be easy: a fairy-tale retelling. I figured that since I already knew the plot, I wouldn’t get stuck. (All seasoned writers who are reading this are probably laughing.) I settled […]

What retellings tell

carter_bloody chamber

On Monday night I went to Harvard Book Store to hear author/editor/anthologist/publisher Kelly Link speak about Angela Carter’s 1979 short story collection The Bloody Chamber: And Other Stories. In May, Penguin Classics rereleased the collection in a 75th anniversary edition (the 75th anniversary of Carter’s birth, that is, not of the book’s original publication) with […]

Book & Me, Week 5

Book & Me by Charise Mericle Harper

Today we posted the final entry (*sniff!*) in Charise Harper Mericle’s original comics “Book & Me.” We’re sad to bid farewell to irrepressible Book and his erstwhile creator, but I imagine them walking hand-in-hand into the sunset, ready for their next bookish adventure. If you’re not ready to say goodbye, why not start over from […]