Josephine: Author Patricia Hruby Powell’s 2014 BGHB NF Honor Speech

Josephine

Thank you to the Boston Globe-Horn Book committee for loving Josephine and putting me in this fine company. Thanks to my critique group who saw this as a picture book, middle grade, and young adult manuscript. Thanks to the group of unfocused preteen girls who frequented the Urbana Free Library, where I work as a […]

Knock Knock: Daniel Beaty and Bryan Collier’s 2014 BGHB PB Honor Speech

Knock Knock

Remarks delivered by editor Alvina Ling. On behalf of Daniel Beaty and Bryan Collier, I’d like to accept this honor for Knock Knock: My Dad’s Dream for Me. Thank you to Roger Sutton and to the committee — Nina, Claire, and Amy — for recognizing this quiet, serious, fairly dark, but ultimately uplifting book. Awards […]

Josephine: Illustrator Christian Robinson’s 2014 BGHB NF Honor Speech

Josephine

Thank you to the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award committee for this incredible honor. If I were to speak truthfully, I would have to say that I’ve already received the greatest honor and privilege when I was first given the opportunity to share the story of Josephine through illustrations of my own. Josephine is one of […]

Five questions for Lizzie Skurnick

skurnick

Since 2013, Lizzie Skurnick Books (LSB; an imprint of Ig Publishing) has been handpicking and reissuing “the very best in young adult literature, from the classics of the 1930s and 1940s to the social novels of the 1970s and 1980s.” The list gained a passel of built-in followers with the release of Sydney Taylor’s All-of-a-Kind-Family series, […]

Liniers on What There Is Before There Is Anything There

liniers_what there is before there is anything there

In the November/December 2014 issue of The Horn Book Magazine, editor Martha Parravano asked Argentinian cartoonist Liniers about the inspiration for his “deeply unsettling” but “bravely existential” new picture book, What There Is Before There Is Anything There: A Scary Story. Read the full review here. Martha V. Parravano: What made you decide to make […]

Remembering Trina Schart Hyman

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November 19, 2014 marks the ten-year anniversary of the death of illustrator Trina Schart Hyman. Author/illustrator Jim Arnosky shares his memories of the Great Lady — what she meant to him as a mentor and as a friend. We are approaching ten years since the world of children’s literature lost Trina Schart Hyman. I still […]

Steampunk queen: An interview with Gail Carriger

carriger_waistcoats and weaponry

Gail Carriger introduced readers to her alternate Victorian London — chock-full of steampunk technology and supernatural characters — in 2009 with Soulless, the first volume of her five-book adult series The Parasol Protectorate. The Finishing School series, a YA prequel series set in the same world, soon followed, beginning with Curtsies & Conspiracies. Espionage lessons, […]

Cece Bell on El Deafo

eldeafo

In the November/December 2014 Horn Book Magazine, reviewer Deirdre Baker asked Cece Bell about her graphic novel memoir El Deafo — which is told entirely with anthropomorphic bunnies. Read the starred review here; see more grrl-power graphic novels here. Deirdre F. Baker: Why did you choose to tell your autobiography with bunny characters? Cece Bell: […]

Five questions for Sharon G. Flake

Photo: Richard Kelly

Is Mr. Davenport a vampire, as Octobia May insists? The answer is not so cut-and-dried in Sharon G. Flake’s Unstoppable Octobia May, a historical-fiction-cum-mystery-novel with more than a dash of social commentary (Scholastic, 9–12 years). From the 1950s boarding house setting to the vivid characters — some plucky, some humorous, some downright sinister — the […]

Girls in Towers

lengle_camilla

Madeleine L’Engle’s novel Camilla (titled Camilla Dickinson when first published in 1951 and recently reissued) features a bright and passionate fifteen-year-old who presents us with the essential question of the YA genre — how will this girl survive the emotional chaos of adolescence? In fairy tales, this same question is more logistical — how will […]