The Horn Book » Lolly’s Classroom http://www.hbook.com Publications about books for children and young adults Fri, 24 Apr 2015 14:44:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.3 Mock book award results | 2015 http://www.hbook.com/2015/04/blogs/lollys-classroom/mock-book-award-results-2015/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/04/blogs/lollys-classroom/mock-book-award-results-2015/#comments Fri, 10 Apr 2015 02:22:42 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=48389 My children’s lit students just met for the last time, and we spent most of our three-hour class in mock book award groups. I had been thinking about trying mock awards in this short six-week module for a few years, but this year Maleka Donaldson Gramling, the terrific course TF, thought it would be worth […]

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mockawardwinners2015

Committee results from left to right: the two Caldecott groups, Geisel, and Sibert.

My children’s lit students just met for the last time, and we spent most of our three-hour class in mock book award groups. I had been thinking about trying mock awards in this short six-week module for a few years, but this year Maleka Donaldson Gramling, the terrific course TF, thought it would be worth reconfiguring some tried and true aspects of the course to make room for this lengthy process. I am happy to report that it was worth it. The students had lively and informed discussions and proved that they really have learned a few things over the past few weeks.

In working out the logistics, I relied heavily on advice from Calling Caldecott readers. With 23 students and a handful of auditors, we ended up with four committees: two for Caldecott and one each for Geisel and Sibert. Each student nominated one or two books and tonight they completed the project, meeting in committees (we separated the two Caldecotts into two different rooms), presenting each book, discussing, and voting. You can see a photo of the results above. Here is the full list.

Caldecott committee #1 had an even number of members and after several ballots were still in a dead tie. The final decision was made by coin toss:

  • Winner:
    The Adventures of Beekle by Dan Santat
  • Honor Book:
    The Iridescence of Birds by Patricia MacLachlan, illustrated by Hadley Hooper

Caldecott committee #2 had a more traditional experience:

  • Winner:
    The Noisy Paintbox by Barb Rosenstock, illustrated by Mary GrandPre
  • Honor Books:
    - Nana in the City by Lauren Castillo
    - The Iridescence of Birds by Patricia MacLachlan, illustrated by Hadley Hooper

Geisel committee choices:

  • Winner:
    You are (Not) Small by Anna Kang, illustrated by Christopher Weyant
  • Honor Book:
    Tippy and the Night Parade by Lilly Carré

And the Sibert committee — the largest group — chose:

  • Winner:
    Eye to Eye by Steve Jenkins
  • Honor Books:
    The Right Word by Jen Bryant, illustrated by Melissa Sweet
    The Noisy Paintbox by Barb Rosenstock, illustrated by Mary GrandPre

The deliberations were fueled by snacks and each group had an instructor t0 help keep discussion focused on award criteria. I am so grateful to Maleka for moderating the Geisel group and to Lauren Adams (unofficial discussion facilitator and Adolescent Lit instructor) who oversaw the Sibert group. I bounced between the two rooms and helped the Caldecott groups.

What do you all think? Students? Other blog readers? Do you like their results? After all, part of the real committee experience is dealing with the post-decision social media fallout.

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Last children’s lit class in 2015 http://www.hbook.com/2015/04/blogs/lollys-classroom/last-childrens-lit-class-in-2015/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/04/blogs/lollys-classroom/last-childrens-lit-class-in-2015/#comments Fri, 03 Apr 2015 13:48:03 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=48106 It’s hard to believe that this half-semester module is finishing up in one week. Last night, students handed in their annotated bibliographies — the big written assignment in this course. Now we head into the last class for a little fun. We are reading Charlotte’s Web for dessert but most of our last meeting will […]

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It’s hard to believe that this half-semester module is finishing up in one week. Last night, students handed in their annotated bibliographies — the big written assignment in this course.

Now we head into the last class for a little fun. We are reading Charlotte’s Web for dessert but most of our last meeting will be all about book awards. We have two Caldecott committees, one Geisel, and one Sibert. Students chose which books to nominate and I’m looking forward to seeing how it all works out. I love seeing that there are some overlaps, not just between the two Caldecotts, but also between Caldecott and Sibert.

I hope some blog readers will weigh in on their slates — and on Charlotte’s Web — at the links above.

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Charlotte’s Web | Class #6, 2015 http://www.hbook.com/2015/04/blogs/lollys-classroom/charlottes-web-class-6-2015/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/04/blogs/lollys-classroom/charlottes-web-class-6-2015/#comments Fri, 03 Apr 2015 13:35:59 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=48088 During our last class meeting, we will be holding four mock book award sessions. There are two Caldecott groups and one each for Geisel and Sibert. Check out the books they have nominated here and tell us which one would get your first vote. Charlotte’s Web has been my last class reading assignment for several […]

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Charlotte's WebDuring our last class meeting, we will be holding four mock book award sessions. There are two Caldecott groups and one each for Geisel and Sibert. Check out the books they have nominated here and tell us which one would get your first vote.

Charlotte’s Web has been my last class reading assignment for several years, and I call it our dessert book. While most of the students have already read it, I usually find that about a third haven’t, particularly those who didn’t grow up in the U.S. It also fits in with our award theme that day because it did not win the Newbery (though it was an honor book).

If this was your first read, what did you think? Did it live up to its reputation as a classic? If this was a re-read, what did you notice this time that you might have missed before?

We’re also reading an article about E. B. White from the Smithsonian Magazine website that sheds some light on the origins of this book. Rather than dividing up this week’s reading, let’s discuss both the book and the article in the comments of this post.

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Mock book awards | Class #6, 2015 http://www.hbook.com/2015/04/blogs/lollys-classroom/mock-book-awards-class-6-2015/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/04/blogs/lollys-classroom/mock-book-awards-class-6-2015/#comments Fri, 03 Apr 2015 13:35:31 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=48090 During our last class, students will meet in mock award groups. I posted about this last week, but we’ve had some updates since then. We will follow the terms and criteria as outlined by the ALA/ALSC: Caldecott terms and criteria Geisel terms and criteria Sibert terns and criteria There are 5-7 students on each committee, […]

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During our last class, students will meet in mock award groups. I posted about this last week, but we’ve had some updates since then. We will follow the terms and criteria as outlined by the ALA/ALSC:

There are 5-7 students on each committee, and each nominated one or two books which they will present to their group when we meet on Thursday. After that, they will discuss their slates, vote, and present their winning books to the class.

Which book in each group do you think is the most worthy, and why?


 Caldecott committee #1

 beekle   rocco_blizzard   frazee_farmer-and-the-clown_17-x137   campbell_hug machine   maclachlan_iridescence of birds    maple   barnett_sam-and-dave_170x229   sparky

  • The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend written and illustrated by Dan Santat
  • Blizzard written and illustrated by John Rocco
  • The Farmer and the Clown by Marla Frazee
  • Hug Machine written and illustrated by Scott Campbell
  • The Iridescence of Birds by Patricia MacLachlan, illustrated by Hadley Hooper
  • Maple written and illustrated by Lori Nichols
  • Sam and Dave Dig a Hole by Mac Barnett, illustrated by Jon Klassen
  • Sparky! by Jenny Offill, illustrated by Chris Appelhans

Caldecott committee #2

maclachlan_iridescence of birds   nana in the city   rosenstock_noisy paint box
barnett_sam-and-dave_170x229   morales_viva-frida_170x170   sidman_winter bees

  • The Iridescence of Birds by Patricia MacLachlan, illustrated by Hadley Hooper
  • Nana in the City written and illustrated by Lauren Castillo
  • The Noisy Paintbox by , illustrated by Mary GrandPre
  • Sam and Dave Dig a Hole by Mac Barnett, illustrated by Jon Klassen
  • Viva Frida by Yuyi Morales
  • Winter Bees and Other Poems of the Cold by Joyce Sidman, illustrated by Rick Allen

 


 Geisel committee

cockadoodle    fix this mess    mr putter and tabby
soccer fence    carre_tippy and the night parade   You-Are-Not-Small

  • Cock-a-Doodle Oops! by Lori Degman, illustrated by Deborah Zemke
  • Fix This Mess! written and illustrated by Tedd Arnold
  • Mr. Putter and Tabby Turn the Page by Cynthia Rylant, illustrated by Arthur Howard
  • The Soccer Fence: A Story of Friendship, Hope, and Apartheid in South Africa by Phil Bildner, illustrated by Jesse Joshua Alexander
  • Tippy and the Night Parade written and illustrated by Lilli Carré
  • You are (Not) Small by Anna Kang, illustrated by Christopher Weyant

 


 Sibert committee
(looking at younger books because this class covers elementary school only)

bang_buried-sunlight_170x209   jenkins_eye to eye   gandhi_grandfather gandhi_170x178
powell_josephine_170x213   rosenstock_noisy paint box   bryant_right-word_170x231   Separate Is Never Equal

  • Buried Sunlight: How Fossil Fuels Have Changed the Earth by Molly Bang and Penny Chisholm, illustrated by Molly Bang
  • Eye to Eye: How Animals See the World by Steve Jenkins
  • Grandfather Gandhi by Arun Gandhi and Bethany Hegedus, illustrated by Evan Turk
  • Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker by Patricia Hruby Powell, illustrated by Christian Robinson
  • The Noisy Paint Box: The Colors and Sounds of Kandinsky’s Abstract Art by Barb Rosenstock, illustrated by Mary GrandPre
  • The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus by Jen Bryant, illustrated by Melissa Sweet
  • Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and her Family’s Fight for Desegregation written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh

 

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Mock book awards | Class #5, 2015 http://www.hbook.com/2015/03/blogs/lollys-classroom/mock-book-awards-class-5-2015/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/03/blogs/lollys-classroom/mock-book-awards-class-5-2015/#respond Sun, 29 Mar 2015 22:48:19 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=47896 This year, most of our last class meeting in Children’s Lit will be devoted to mock book awards. Each student selected a committee to join (Caldecott for picture books, Geisel for easy readers, or Sibert for information books) and chose one or two eligible books published in 2014 to nominate and present to his or […]

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This year, most of our last class meeting in Children’s Lit will be devoted to mock book awards. Each student selected a committee to join (Caldecott for picture books, Geisel for easy readers, or Sibert for information books) and chose one or two eligible books published in 2014 to nominate and present to his or her committee. Presentations will be followed by discussion, voting, and of course snacking throughout.

Each group will follow the terms and criteria as outlined by the American Library Association/ALSC:

Here are the books each committee will discuss (with a couple more still to be chosen). Please help us out by commenting on which book on each slate you think is the most worthy, and why.


 Caldecott committee #1

  • The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend written and illustrated by Dan Santat
  • Blizzard written and illustrated by John Rocco
  • NEW: just added The Farmer and the Clown by Marla Frazee
  • Hug Machine written and illustrated by Scott Campbell
  • The Iridescence of Birds by Patricia MacLachlan, illustrated by Hadley Hooper
  • Maple written and illustrated by Lori Nichols
  • Sparky! by Jenny Offill, illustrated by Chris Appelhans

h810f_caldecott1_2015


Caldecott committee #2

  • The Iridescence of Birds by Patricia MacLachlan, illustrated by Hadley Hooper
  • Nana in the City written and illustrated by Lauren Castillo
  • The Noisy Paintbox by , illustrated by Mary GrandPre
  • Sam and Dave Dig a Hole by Mac Barnett, illustrated by Jon Klassen
  • Viva Frida by Yuyi Morales
  • Winter Bees and Other Poems of the Cold by Joyce Sidman, illustrated by Rick Allen

h810f_caldecott2_2015


 Geisel committee

  • Cock-a-Doodle Oops! by Lori Degman, illustrated by Deborah Zemke
  • Fix This Mess! written and illustrated by Tedd Arnold
  • Mr. Putter and Tabby Turn the Page by Cynthia Rylant, illustrated by Arthur Howard
  • NEW: just added The Soccer Fence: A Story of Friendship, Hope, and Apartheid in South Africa by Phil Bildner, illustrated by Jesse Joshua Alexander
  • Tippy and the Night Parade written and illustrated by Lilli Carré
  • You are (Not) Small by Anna Kang, illustrated by Christopher Weyant

h810f_geisel_2015


 Sibert committee
(looking at younger books because this class covers elementary school only)

  • Buried Sunlight: How Fossil Fuels Have Changed the Earth by Molly Bang and Penny Chisholm, illustrated by Molly Bang
  • Eye to Eye: How Animals See the World by Steve Jenkins
  • Grandfather Gandhi by Arun Gandhi and Bethany Hegedus, illustrated by Evan Turk
  • Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker by Patricia Hruby Powell, illustrated by Christian Robinson
  • The Noisy Paint Box: The Colors and Sounds of Kandinsky’s Abstract Art by Barb Rosenstock, illustrated by Mary GrandPre
  • The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus by Jen Bryant, illustrated by Melissa Sweet
  • Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and her Family’s Fight for Desegregation written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh

h810f_sibert_2015

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Folklore and poetry | Class #5, 2015 http://www.hbook.com/2015/03/blogs/lollys-classroom/folklore-and-poetry-class-5-2015/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/03/blogs/lollys-classroom/folklore-and-poetry-class-5-2015/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 10:05:27 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=47711 For our class on April 2, we are reading four books and one article. I like combining these two genres because both need to be read aloud in order to really appreciate them. Folklore has to have a strong voice, as it comes from an oral tradition where storytellers have individual styles, just as today’s […]

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Folklore and poetry

For our class on April 2, we are reading four books and one article. I like combining these two genres because both need to be read aloud in order to really appreciate them.

Folklore has to have a strong voice, as it comes from an oral tradition where storytellers have individual styles, just as today’s popular singers have their own ways of putting songs across. Poetry, too, needs to be heard to appreciate the sound of the words — and spoken aloud to feel their combinations in your mouth. And of course poetry needs to be seen on the page because the line breaks, indentations, and even the leading are as important. Each of these four books is expertly illustrated, as well. So there is lots to analyze and discuss this week!

Representing folklore stand-alone picture books, Mrs. Chicken and the Hungry Crocodile is a  hybrid of two story types: the trickster and the noodlehead. This story probably originated in northeastern Liberia where it was collected by Won-Ldy Pay. The second folklore book is Glass Slipper, Gold Sandal, Paul Fleischman’s compilation of tales from a variety of origins, all of the Cinderella story type — persecuted heroins with supernatural helpers.

Representing poetry, we are reading Poetrees, one of Douglas Florian’s themed poetry books, this time about trees. For our poetry compilation, we have the über-collection of poetry forms compiled by Paul Janeszco, A Kick in the Head. There are plenty of compilations for children that feature one poetry type — haiku, concrete poems, etc. This one has one of everything — or as close to everything as I’ve found for an elementary-aged audience.

Finally, we are reading Susan Dove Lempke’s Horn Book article, “Purposeful Poetry” from our May/June 2005 special issue on poetry.

We invite all of you to join our discussion this week in the comments of the individual posts linked above.

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Mrs. Chicken and the Hungry Crocodile | Class #5, 2015 http://www.hbook.com/2015/03/blogs/lollys-classroom/mrs-chicken-and-the-hungry-crocodile-class-5-2015/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/03/blogs/lollys-classroom/mrs-chicken-and-the-hungry-crocodile-class-5-2015/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 10:04:36 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=47719 There are so many stand-alone folktale picture books that it’s hard to choose just one for us to read together. But I’ve used this one for several years because of its humor, voice, and authenticity. Interestingly, it also represents two story types: noodleheads (heroes or heroins who are a bit scatterbrained) and tricksters (a small […]

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Mrs. Chicken and the Hungry CrocodileThere are so many stand-alone folktale picture books that it’s hard to choose just one for us to read together. But I’ve used this one for several years because of its humor, voice, and authenticity. Interestingly, it also represents two story types: noodleheads (heroes or heroins who are a bit scatterbrained) and tricksters (a small person or animal who is lower in a hierarchy — like the food chain — tricking the higher-up character).

I urge you not to try too hard to find a message for children here. Lots of folktales are meant for pure enjoyment and escapism. One reason kids like trickster tales is because they can identify with the lower class or smaller characters, since most of the time in their world, the adult calls the shots — and wins the arguments.

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Glass Slipper, Gold Sandal | Class #5, 2015 http://www.hbook.com/2015/03/blogs/lollys-classroom/glass-slipper-gold-sandal-class-5-2015/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/03/blogs/lollys-classroom/glass-slipper-gold-sandal-class-5-2015/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 10:03:48 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=47717 One of the fascinating and mysterious things about folklore is that the same story types appear all over the world. Here’s a single picture book that tells a Cinderella-type story as found in several different cultures. I think children would need to first be familiar with a single, cohesive version of this story in order […]

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Glass Slipper, Gold SandalOne of the fascinating and mysterious things about folklore is that the same story types appear all over the world. Here’s a single picture book that tells a Cinderella-type story as found in several different cultures.

I think children would need to first be familiar with a single, cohesive version of this story in order to appreciate this book, but that is easily done. There are plenty of terrific stand-alone picture books of Cinderella, Cendrillon, etc., including our old friend John Steptoe‘s Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters.

What do you make of this one? Notice how the story is made cohesive, yet also kept separate, thanks mostly to Paschkis’s illustrations and the book’s design. Does this work for you? For children?

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Poetrees | Class #5, 2015 http://www.hbook.com/2015/03/blogs/lollys-classroom/poetrees-class-5-2015/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/03/blogs/lollys-classroom/poetrees-class-5-2015/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 10:02:14 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=47715 As you know if you’ve read Susan Lempke’s article, there are lots and lots of books with poems about a particular subject — enough to read one every day of the school year. As she says, some work better than others as poems. What do you think of this one? Florian has several volumes of […]

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PoetreesAs you know if you’ve read Susan Lempke’s article, there are lots and lots of books with poems about a particular subject — enough to read one every day of the school year. As she says, some work better than others as poems.

What do you think of this one? Florian has several volumes of this kind: poems about planets, amphibians, fish, mammals, seasons, etc. I think his poems and art work on several levels. In most cases, they are both simple and quite sophisticated.

One thing to bear in mind as you read any book that has multiple poems: you are not necessarily supposed to read the whole book in one sitting. Poems need breathing room, both on the page and in time. They are meant to be savored one at a time, so if you are reading this book all at once, give yourself a few beats to digest the words and images before you move on to the next one.

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A Kick in the Head | Class #5, 2015 http://www.hbook.com/2015/03/blogs/lollys-classroom/a-kick-in-the-head-class-5-2015/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/03/blogs/lollys-classroom/a-kick-in-the-head-class-5-2015/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 10:01:43 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=47713 This is one of those books for kids that tends to be an eye-opener for most adults, too. Who knew there were this many poetry forms out there?! Notice how the book could be enjoyed by just reading the poems. OR, if you want to learn more, you can see what the form is and […]

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A Kick in the HeadThis is one of those books for kids that tends to be an eye-opener for most adults, too. Who knew there were this many poetry forms out there?!

Notice how the book could be enjoyed by just reading the poems. OR, if you want to learn more, you can see what the form is and use Chris Raschka’s symbols to help you remember. If you want even MORE, read the super-small print at the bottom of the page.

I hope you will all take time to read Janescko’s excellent introduction. He’s a teacher himself and knows how to explain poetry in ways that everyone can understand. Why all the rules? Well, would a basketball game be any fun to watch if there were no rules? Same with poetry. But he’s also good on why it’s okay to break the rules sometimes.

Most of all, I implore you NOT to read this book fast or all at once. If you were sharing this with children, you certainly wouldn’t. If you have to read it under time pressure (e.g. on reserve), then try to imagine it being read with children just a little bit at a time.

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