The Horn Book » Out of the Box http://www.hbook.com Publications about books for children and young adults Mon, 29 Jun 2015 16:18:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 #ALAAC15 + HB Mag http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/alaac15-hb-mag/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/alaac15-hb-mag/#respond Mon, 29 Jun 2015 14:30:11 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=50644 What a thrilling ALA Annual conference this year in San Francisco (so we hear…). We hope you were able to pick up a copy of the July/August Horn Book Magazine: Special Issue: Awards. If not, it’ll be in your mailbox soon. If not? Subscribe to the Magazine, for goodness sake! In this Special Issue you’ll […]

The post #ALAAC15 + HB Mag appeared first on The Horn Book.

]]>
July/August 2015 Horn Book MagazineWhat a thrilling ALA Annual conference this year in San Francisco (so we hear…). We hope you were able to pick up a copy of the July/August Horn Book Magazine: Special Issue: Awards. If not, it’ll be in your mailbox soon. If not? Subscribe to the Magazine, for goodness sake!

In this Special Issue you’ll find: the Newbery, Caldecott, Coretta Scott King, and Wilder awards speeches plus profiles of the winning authors and illustrators; roundups of the year in Newbery, Caldecott, and CSK; our annual Mind the Gap Awards (the books that didn’t win); and LOTS more — here’s the TOC. It’s a good one, if we do say so ourselves.

Here’s our plan for this week:

Today we’ll post Christopher Myers’s stirring Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award speech and 2015 CSK/Steptoe winner Jason Reynolds’s profile of his “giant” friend and colleague.

Tomorrow (Tuesday) we’ll post Jacqueline Woodson’s Coretta Scott King Author Award speech and profile of Woodson by her editor Nancy Paulsen.

Wednesday look for profiles of Newbery winner Kwame Alexander, by Nikki Giovanni no less!, and Dan Santat, by editor Connie Hsu.

Thursday we’ll post a profile of Wilder Medal winner Donald Crews by his daughter Nina, herself an accomplished author/illustrator.

Phew! Then we celebrate the Fourth of July. And then we’ll give you more. Enjoy!

The post #ALAAC15 + HB Mag appeared first on The Horn Book.

]]>
http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/alaac15-hb-mag/feed/ 0
Conference report: Association of Jewish Libraries 2015 http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/conference-report-association-of-jewish-libraries-2015/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/conference-report-association-of-jewish-libraries-2015/#respond Fri, 26 Jun 2015 16:00:07 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=50562 While you wait with bated breath for next week’s ALA Annual conference — and the July/August Horn Book Magazine containing the Newbery, Caldecott, Coretta Scott King, and Wilder awards speeches and profiles of the winners, plus roundups of the year’s books, our Mind the Gap Awards for books that didn’t win at ALA, and more […]

The post Conference report: Association of Jewish Libraries 2015 appeared first on The Horn Book.

]]>
While you wait with bated breath for next week’s ALA Annual conference — and the July/August Horn Book Magazine containing the Newbery, Caldecott, Coretta Scott King, and Wilder awards speeches and profiles of the winners, plus roundups of the year’s books, our Mind the Gap Awards for books that didn’t win at ALA, and more — let me tell you about the Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) conference’s Jubilee year, celebrating fifty years of AJL.

The conference was held in Silver Spring, Maryland, a short Metro ride from downtown Washington, DC. There was a family program and a welcome dinner on Sunday, then sessions started in earnest on Monday. I was on a panel on Monday morning about book reviewing, moderated by peppy and smart librarian Rachel Kamin, with fellow panel members Alan Cheuse from NPR, Washington Post columnist (did I forget to say Pulitzer Prize winner?) Michael Dirda, Jewish Book World‘s children’s editor Michal Hoschander Malen, and Lisa Silverman of the Los Angeles Jewish Journal (um, wow). Discussion included: the mechanics of writing a review, how to be critical without being mean, how to (whether to?) review self-published books, and more; there was no time left for audience questions, and we basically had to be kicked out so the next panel could start.

AJL_rev_panel

On book reviewing: Michal Malin, Michael Dirda, Alan Cheuse, Elissa Gershowitz (me!), and Lisa Silverman. Photo: AJL

aylesworth_my grandfather's coatOn Tuesday afternoon the winners of the Sydney Taylor Book Award for Younger Readers, Jim Aylesworth (author) and Barbara McClintock (illustrator), spoke about their picture book My Grandfather’s Coat, and I fangirled out AGAIN! on them both (but mostly Barbara, sorry Barbara).

Before his very successful children’s writing career, Jim spent many years as a teacher, which in turn taught him what kids love and what to write about, among other topics (and in song, no less!): Sound, Poetry, Animals, Fantasy, Language, Color, “Gross Stuff” (the latter not Barbara’s forte, he qualified). Regarding folklore: Comparing different versions of folktales encourages very young kids to think in a way that’s “literary, not literal.” In tune, and with slides and hand gestures and audience participation: “One book is good… / One book is good… / Put them together, and it makes them both better.” Lucky, lucky students to have had Mr. Aylesworth.

Barbara talked about her inspiration for the book’s illustrations: the Jewish farmers who moved to rural northeastern Connecticut in the early-to-mid twentieth century, where she now lives and where “cows outnumber people two to one.” It’s a different take on the traditional Yiddish folk tune on which My Grandfather’s Coat is based; Simms Taback’s Caldecott-winning Joseph Had a Little Overcoat, for example, was based on the same song and featured an Old World setting.

Jim and Barbara’s editor Dianne Hess, executive editor at Scholastic, was there, and the pair credited her with much of the book’s success. Editor Sylvie Frank, from Paula Wiseman Books, spoke on behalf of Donna Jo Napoli, winner of the Sydney Taylor Book Award for Teen Readers, for Storm. Donna Jo was in Italy, but Sylvie had sent her some questions about the book, anticipating our questions, and she read us her questions and Donna Jo’s answers; they brought up the bonobo sex before we even had the chance. The winners for Older Readers, Loïc Dauvillier, Marc Lizano, and Greg Salsedo, for Hidden: A Child’s Story of the Holocaust, could not attend and sent a speech that was read by our wonderful committee chair Diane Levin Rauchwerger.

My committee then did a panel on trends in Jewish children’s books from last year. I talked about observant Jewish YA love stories, Kathy Bloomfield talked about inclusivity, Heather Lenson presented Holocaust books, and Ellen Tilman discussed graphic novels. Incoming committee member Susan Kusel — who was on the 2014 Caldecott committee but who WOULD NOT CRACK despite my persistence — presented a 2015 book, Watch Out for Flying Kids, as “something different” for this year.

taylor_panel

Kathy Bloomfield, Elissa Gershowitz (me!), Diane Rauchwerger, Heather Lenson, Ellen Tilman, Susan Kusel. Photo: AJL

Home stretch! The AJL Banquet took place that night. Jim and Barbara spoke, along with Sylvie for Donna Jo, and several of the Honor Book recipients: Barbara Krasner (for Goldie Takes a Stand) and Jacqueline Jules (for Never Say a Mean Word Again: A Tale from Medieval Spain); Donna Gephart (for Death by Toilet Paper) and Jennifer Elvgren (for The Whispering Town). Here’s the complete list of winners, honorees, and notables for 2015.

aylesworth_mcclintock

Jim Aylesworth and Barbara McClintock at the AJL Banquet. Photo: AJL

And now we buckle down and read read read and choose the books for 2016. Wish us luck! And BTW, if you haven’t yet figured out Which All-of-a-Kind Family sibling YOU are, now’s your chance! Take our quiz and find out. I’m an Ella. Roger is a Henny. (I know, right?!)

The post Conference report: Association of Jewish Libraries 2015 appeared first on The Horn Book.

]]>
http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/conference-report-association-of-jewish-libraries-2015/feed/ 0
Love wins! http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/love-wins/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/love-wins/#respond Fri, 26 Jun 2015 13:33:46 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=50630 We are so thrilled about today’s marriage equality ruling! To celebrate, here’s a round-up of some of our resources on LGBTQ children’s books and book creators. 5Q for Stonewall author Ann Bausum “Transformers: Reimagining the World” by author Malinda Lo “Five Gay Picture-Book Prodigies and the Difference They’ve Made” by Barbara Bader “The Difference that […]

The post Love wins! appeared first on The Horn Book.

]]>
rainbow flag

We are so thrilled about today’s marriage equality ruling! To celebrate, here’s a round-up of some of our resources on LGBTQ children’s books and book creators.

 

The post Love wins! appeared first on The Horn Book.

]]>
http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/love-wins/feed/ 0
Tales from a since-third-grade fangirl: Judy Blume in conversation with Tom Ashbrook http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/tales-from-a-since-third-grade-fangirl-judy-blume-in-conversation-with-tom-ashbrook/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/tales-from-a-since-third-grade-fangirl-judy-blume-in-conversation-with-tom-ashbrook/#respond Thu, 25 Jun 2015 16:44:02 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=50567 Last night, a bookstore dear to my heart hosted an author dear to my heart. And my heart was glad. To put it another way, Brookline Booksmith hosted Judy Blume in conversation with Tom Ashbrook at the Coolidge Corner Theatre. The event was in honor of her new adult novel, In the Unlikely Event, but […]

The post Tales from a since-third-grade fangirl: Judy Blume in conversation with Tom Ashbrook appeared first on The Horn Book.

]]>
Last night, a bookstore dear to my heart hosted an author dear to my heart. And my heart was glad.

Photo by Shoshana Flax

Photo by Shoshana Flax

blume_in the unlikely eventTo put it another way, Brookline Booksmith hosted Judy Blume in conversation with Tom Ashbrook at the Coolidge Corner Theatre. The event was in honor of her new adult novel, In the Unlikely Event, but as Ashbrook listed some of her other work and various pockets of the audience clapped and cheered, it became obvious that virtually everyone in the room felt a connection with at least one of her previous books. (Or, um, all of them.)

In the historical novel, Blume circles back to events from her youth in Elizabeth, New Jersey, where three planes crashed in the space of two months in the winter of 1951–52. She and Ashbrook discussed the catharsis of writing about this chapter of her formative years. “Since I wrote this book, I can sleep on a plane,” she said.

But the conversation gave at least as much weight to her writing for younger audiences, and her respect for readers of all ages was clear. She said that although she’s often cited as a pioneer of young adult literature, she doesn’t see most of her work as YA, except for Forever and maybe Tiger Eyes. Most of her books, she said, are more for “kids on the brink,” who are still approaching the teen years. There were, of course, questions about the sometimes sensitive topics she’s exposed for young readers, but she said that she doesn’t think about topics as much as stories and characters when she sets out to write a book. She “got no grief” from publishers in the 1970s, but said her books were challenged in the more conservative 1980s. “Censors don’t care about books kids don’t love,” she said, citing — and praising — Sherman Alexie’s oft-challenged The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. One audience member, who’d been reading the Fudge books aloud to her daughters, asked if it was okay to “censor” a passage in which the mother is away and the father leaves dishes in the sink for her return. Blume responded that she’d rather the questioner read the passage with her daughters and laugh about the dad’s avoidance of housework.

The question that got the strongest reaction came from one of the very few under-eighteen audience members (and features a Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing spoiler): “Why does the turtle die?” Blume replied that she’s only begun to hear that question recently, decades after the book’s publication. She gave a simple explanation of how the turtle was removed after being swallowed by a rambunctious child and that a tummy “just wasn’t a very good place for Dribble.” “Did that make you feel bad?” she asked. The young girl nodded and replied that Dribble’s death had made her sad, to lots of awwww-ing from the audience.

The mass of Fudge fans, Margaret fans, Summer Sisters fans, and the rest adjourned to the signing line at the bookstore. When my turn came to gush in person, intrepid events director Tom Wickersham introduced me as a former Booksmithie now working for The Horn Book. “I used to be terrified of The Horn Book,” Blume confessed as she signed my Unlikely Event.

Well, Judy, you’ve got at least one big fan here. (More, I imagine.) And a reread of at least one of your books in the near future is a very likely event.

Videos and more photos of the evening are available here.

The post Tales from a since-third-grade fangirl: Judy Blume in conversation with Tom Ashbrook appeared first on The Horn Book.

]]>
http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/tales-from-a-since-third-grade-fangirl-judy-blume-in-conversation-with-tom-ashbrook/feed/ 0
Tiny Hands Raccoon Treehouse app review http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/choosing-books/app-review-of-the-week/tiny-hands-raccoon-treehouse-app-review/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/choosing-books/app-review-of-the-week/tiny-hands-raccoon-treehouse-app-review/#respond Thu, 25 Jun 2015 16:00:27 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=50479 As the TinyHands Raccoon Treehouse app (TinyHands, 2013) opens, you’re greeted by a raccoon, gently bobbing in the air, balloons attached to his suspenders. Hit the “play” button and you’re brought down to the base of a tree (past tunnels and living quarters burrowed into the trunk) where there are a number of games to […]

The post Tiny Hands Raccoon Treehouse app review appeared first on The Horn Book.

]]>
raccoon treehouse title screenAs the TinyHands Raccoon Treehouse app (TinyHands, 2013) opens, you’re greeted by a raccoon, gently bobbing in the air, balloons attached to his suspenders.

Hit the “play” button and you’re brought down to the base of a tree (past tunnels and living quarters burrowed into the trunk) where there are a number of games to choose from: “Sorting,” “Build,” and “Pairing,” to name a few.

raccoon treehouse games

Tap to play and you can sort fruits by color with a color-coordinated farmer raccoon, build toys with a curly-haired baby raccoon, or pair clothes with a pig-tailed mama raccoon.

raccoon treehouse matching

A large hand appears at the very beginning to show you how exactly to play the game, then the rest is up to you (if too much time goes by without your making a choice, the hand will reappear to, well, lend a hand).

Every time you choose correctly, a cheerful “sparkly” kind of noise plays and tiny white stars glimmer around your genius choice (if chosen incorrectly, a very friendly boing noise plays and the item returns to where it was). Upon completion of the game, forest-type flora appears around the edges of the screen and a celebrating animal pops drops down on a vine to display its happiness at your win.

With pleasing sounds and friendly graphics — featuring bright, bold, big-eyed animals who look really happy to play — this is an incredibly approachable (if not very engrossing) app to teach simple matching and sorting skills.

Available for iPad (requires iOS 5.1 or later); $3.99 for full version, free for four-game “lite” version. Recommended for preschool users.

The post Tiny Hands Raccoon Treehouse app review appeared first on The Horn Book.

]]>
http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/choosing-books/app-review-of-the-week/tiny-hands-raccoon-treehouse-app-review/feed/ 0
The mouse that roared http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/mouse-that-roared/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/mouse-that-roared/#respond Wed, 24 Jun 2015 16:00:04 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=50487 The Little Mouse Santi, with a story by David Eugene Ray and illustrations by Santiago Germano, is a classic-feeling picture book for young readers. In it, the main character, a mouse named Santi, wants to be a cat. He studies the farm cats and copies their activities and attitudes until he has the whole cat […]

The post The mouse that roared appeared first on The Horn Book.

]]>
ray_little mouse santiThe Little Mouse Santi, with a story by David Eugene Ray and illustrations by Santiago Germano, is a classic-feeling picture book for young readers. In it, the main character, a mouse named Santi, wants to be a cat. He studies the farm cats and copies their activities and attitudes until he has the whole cat thing down. (Meowing. Ignoring everyone. Pretending he was bored.) Although he’s nervous, he finally works up the courage to approach one of the cats, show his stuff, and ask, “Do you think I make a good cat?” The cat’s reply is unexpected but perfectly suited to a picture book about the search for identity.

The Little Mouse Santi is a winner. It has a child-friendly, universal story; clean illustrations that recall Japanese anime but are entirely original; effective use of double-page spreads and of page turns; and a funny twist at the end. The language is pared down and direct, well-paced for a smooth unfolding of the story; the production values are high, with good-quality paper and a durable binding.

So, who’s the publisher? Nope, it’s not one out of New York or San Francisco or even Grand Rapids. It’s published by a New Orleans press so small it barely qualifies as such: “Confetti Park is a children’s media workshop, podcast, and weekly radio program based out of New Orleans. We gather and tell stories, through music, art, puppetry, animations, and more.” Yep. The times and the delivery systems, they are a-changin’, but the books themselves — maybe not so much.

The Little Mouse Santi was published in January 2015. (Here are the ordering details from Confetti Park.) Since then it’s been picked up by Barnes & Noble and Amazon, and it even has its own Facebook page. My local library system owns half a dozen copies, all of which are currently checked out. Santi may not be a cat, but he sure is a hit.

The post The mouse that roared appeared first on The Horn Book.

]]>
http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/mouse-that-roared/feed/ 0
While the cat’s away… http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/while-the-cats-away/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/while-the-cats-away/#respond Tue, 23 Jun 2015 16:11:50 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=50491 With our “grownup” coworkers variously attending conferences, working from home, or out sick (get better soon, Lolly!), Siân, Shoshana, Katrina, intern Willa, and I are having a Millennials’ Day in the Office. There might be some Taylor Swift happening. A (short-lived) book fort definitely happened: (Shoshana is a good sport.)

The post While the cat’s away… appeared first on The Horn Book.

]]>
With our “grownup” coworkers variously attending conferences, working from home, or out sick (get better soon, Lolly!), Siân, Shoshana, Katrina, intern Willa, and I are having a Millennials’ Day in the Office.

There might be some Taylor Swift happening.

A (short-lived) book fort definitely happened:

sf in book fort

(Shoshana is a good sport.)

The post While the cat’s away… appeared first on The Horn Book.

]]>
http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/while-the-cats-away/feed/ 0
Make some noise: Hubbub Festival’s Creative Commotion for Kids http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/make-some-noise-hubbub-festivals-creative-commotion-for-kids/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/make-some-noise-hubbub-festivals-creative-commotion-for-kids/#respond Mon, 22 Jun 2015 17:45:56 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=50350 Hubbub is a brand-new child-centric creativity festival produced by Boston Book Fest. The festival’s mission statement: Our goal is to inspire and encourage creativity with a combination of world-class authors and artistic acts, as well as hands-on activities and experiences where kids will experiment, design, and create. We believe that curiosity, excitement, wonder, and play […]

The post Make some noise: Hubbub Festival’s Creative Commotion for Kids appeared first on The Horn Book.

]]>
Hubbub is a brand-new child-centric creativity festival produced by Boston Book Fest. The festival’s mission statement:

Our goal is to inspire and encourage creativity with a combination of world-class authors and artistic acts, as well as hands-on activities and experiences where kids will experiment, design, and create. We believe that curiosity, excitement, wonder, and play are the keys to lifelong learning.  

On Saturday, June 20th, The Horn Book joined an impressive array of authors and illustrators, performers, workshop and activity leaders, and exhibitors for the day-long event. Some highlights from staff members:

Siân interviewed friend and author/illustrator David Hyde Costello.

Shoshana:

We may not have been as glamorous as the giant Puppeteers Cooperative puppets doing laps around the square, or as enthralling as Massmouth Storytellers’ rendition of The Story of Ferdinand. But our table still drew some attention. Not all festival attendees were familiar with The Horn Book, but they looked curiously at our Summer Reading list and magazines and flipped through the freshly-stickered Boston Globe–Horn Book Award winners on display.

bghb winners stickered

The 2015 Boston Globe–Horn Book Award winners. Photo: Roger Sutton.

(The Munchkins on the table held some attraction, too.) A few kids and grownups talked books with us; one young Richard Peck fan taught us the word susurration, which she’d learned from The Mouse with the Question Mark Tail.

Some of our visitors knew our publications well, and approached enthusiastically. (One of my Simmons classmates even welcomed us with grilled cheese from Roxy’s.) But the most energy by far came from Ame Dyckman, who stopped by our booth with her family on her way to her own reading and greeted us like old friends.

Wolfie the Bunny author Ame Dyckman

Wolfie the Bunny author Ame Dyckman. Photo: Shoshana Flax.

We thanked her for the carrots.

Katie:

I didn’t see much of the festival itself, but the view from our booth was pretty great. It was wonderful to see familiar faces from around the Boston children’s lit community, ranging from my former Simmons ChLit classmates and bookstore colleagues to authors and illustrators (Jeanne Birdsall!).

My favorite visit of the day? Two little girls, ages about four and six, sporting hand-colored Pigeon headpieces. “I’m the Pigeon! I’m driving the bus!” the younger one proudly exclaimed to Roger. Not to be outdone, her big sister hollered, “I’m the Pigeon and I EAT BIRDS!” Yeah, I don’t know either.

Another, quieter moment that nevertheless captured just as much excitement about books: a girl about nine years old saw The Farmer and the Clown displayed on our table and gravitated toward it. “This is a really good book,” she told her mom, and proceeded to narrate the full story with plenty of emotional nuance.

And some pictures:

roger and mo

Mo Willems and Roger. Photo: Siân Gaetano.

sian at hubbub booth

Siân holds down the fort. Photo: Roger Sutton.

Giant puppets on parade. Photo: Shoshana Flax.

Giant puppets on parade. Photo: Shoshana Flax.

Missed it? Grab our Hubbub booth handouts here:

Bonus: here’s Elissa’s recap of a pre-Hubbub panel, which includes several recommended reading lists created just for Hubbub.

The post Make some noise: Hubbub Festival’s Creative Commotion for Kids appeared first on The Horn Book.

]]>
http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/make-some-noise-hubbub-festivals-creative-commotion-for-kids/feed/ 0
7(.5) Totally Useless Questions for David Hyde Costello http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/7-5-totally-useless-questions-for-david-hyde-costello/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/7-5-totally-useless-questions-for-david-hyde-costello/#respond Mon, 22 Jun 2015 17:36:45 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=50467 After working the Horn Book booth at Saturday’s Hubbub Festival, I met up with David Hyde Costello, author/illustrator of Here They Come, I Can Help, and Little Pig Joins the Band before his scheduled event: a reading of his most recent illustrated work, A Crow of His Own (written by Megan Dowd Lambert). I could […]

The post 7(.5) Totally Useless Questions for David Hyde Costello appeared first on The Horn Book.

]]>
lambert_crow of his ownAfter working the Horn Book booth at Saturday’s Hubbub Festival, I met up with David Hyde Costello, author/illustrator of Here They Come, I Can Help, and Little Pig Joins the Band before his scheduled event: a reading of his most recent illustrated work, A Crow of His Own (written by Megan Dowd Lambert).

I could have asked him about the upcoming event, A Crow of His Own, or, really, anything at all to do with being an author/illustrator.

I didn’t.

1. Gryffindor or Hufflepuff? 

That’s from the Harry Potter books, right? Ask me about Star Wars.

2. What is your favorite constellation? 

Like in the sky? Orion? It’s the only one I can identify.

3a. Pick a bird.

Penguin.

3b. Could you best it in a fight?

Easily. I’d punch that thing in the head. No, I’m kidding, of course. I would never punch a penguin. I want it to be on record that I would never punch a penguin.

4. North Pole or South?

South. There are some penguins I’d like to apologize to.

5. Which character from literature would you kill?

It’s too early in my campaign to go negative.

6. What’s your His Dark Materials dæmon?

Red fox.

7. Weapon of choice for the apocalypse?

My razor-sharp mind. A white flag? A weapon is not the first thing I think of when thinking about apocalypse preparedness.

7.5. What do you think of re: the apocalypse?

I dunno…Canned food, shelter, creating a harmonious society in a world gone wrong. Ya know, same stuff I think about now.

 

[Okay okay, I also asked him one real question.]

8. What do you like best about these events?

When someone asks me what part of being an author is the most fun I tell them the very beginning when I first get an idea and I’m coming up with the story, and then the very last part when I get to read the book to an audience of children. Obviously there is a marketing component to an event like this one, but luckily I really enjoy being in front of an audience of children.

 

DHC also told me it is important to have stylish footwear when your audience is at knee-level. Exhibit A:

DHC bikes sock

The post 7(.5) Totally Useless Questions for David Hyde Costello appeared first on The Horn Book.

]]>
http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/blogs/out-of-the-box/7-5-totally-useless-questions-for-david-hyde-costello/feed/ 0
Harry’s Healthy Garden app review http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/choosing-books/app-review-of-the-week/harrys-healthy-garden-app-review/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/choosing-books/app-review-of-the-week/harrys-healthy-garden-app-review/#respond Thu, 18 Jun 2015 16:00:02 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=50291 Learn to plant a garden — and reap the delicious, healthy rewards — in Harry’s Healthy Garden (Baby First with content provided by the American Heart Association, June 2015). Peppy Harry the Bunny welcomes children to select a garden bed (there are twelve, six per screen) then choose their first crop: garden beans, parsley, tomatoes, […]

The post Harry’s Healthy Garden app review appeared first on The Horn Book.

]]>
IMG_0084Learn to plant a garden — and reap the delicious, healthy rewards — in Harry’s Healthy Garden (Baby First with content provided by the American Heart Association, June 2015). Peppy Harry the Bunny welcomes children to select a garden bed (there are twelve, six per screen) then choose their first crop: garden beans, parsley, tomatoes, summer squash, spinach, sweet peppers, green onions, lettuce, strawberries, yellow corn, cauliflower, carrots.

Say we pick garden beans: children are encouraged to dig holes, swiping a shovel with their finger, then pour fertilizer, plant seeds, and cover the holes (all with finger swipes). Since our crop needs poles to grow (not all of them do), we set up the poles that appear, then water the plants using a watering can. We swipe the sun to shine on our crops, the beans start to grow, flies appear (and we help a frog eat them), then we harvest the beans by swiping them into a basket. The same basic format applies for each of the crops with some slight variation in the activities; for example, for carrots you first have to remove rocks from the garden bed and for strawberries you need to pull some weeds.

IMG_0085

After the crops are harvested, the scene changes to a kitchen (“Washing fruit and vegetables is very important” reminds Harry as a sink rinses them off). Then we chop with the provided knife (“Be careful with the knife”) and “prepare a yummy dish.”

IMG_0086

There are six preparation methods to choose from, and more helpful safety reminders; if you choose the oven Harry says, “Let’s roast! Don’t touch the hot oven without oven mitts” (and the app will only let you open the oven door by swiping the mitt provided). The timer rings, the dish is done, another reminder (“Be careful, it’s hot! Before eating a hot dish, you must let it cool down”), then Harry, hungry, politely asks if he can eat it. After that you can go back to the garden to select a new crop to grow.

Harry is persistent; on any screen, if you don’t act quickly enough he happily repeats himself (just a little more time to think would be useful; then again, it’s not War and Peace, and you can mute Harry). Farm-appropriate-sounding banjo music plays in the background, upbeat, as is everything in this super-cheerful (but not annoyingly so) up-with-agriculture app. American Heart Association links (recipes, nutritional guidelines, etc.) are included in the About section.

Available for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch (requires iOS 6.0 or later); free. Recommended for preschool users.

The post Harry’s Healthy Garden app review appeared first on The Horn Book.

]]>
http://www.hbook.com/2015/06/choosing-books/app-review-of-the-week/harrys-healthy-garden-app-review/feed/ 0