Three graphic novels

Yummy

          Boxers and Saints by Gene Luen Yang (First Second, 2013) Yummy: The Last Days of a Southside Shorty by G. Neri, illustrated by Randy DuBurke (Lee & Low, 2010) Graphic novels are enjoying a surge of interest and critical attention. Gene Luen Yang’s American Born Chinese was the first graphic novel nominated for […]

Reviewing race

Strickland

Over on Facebook, illustrator Shadra Strickland asks a good question: “Why is it necessary for a reviewer to identify the ethnicity of a character in their review when the plot has zero to do with race…especially in picture books? A friend just told me that in her latest pb, her family was identified as Caucasian. […]

Roxie’s Puzzle Adventure app review

roxie's puzzle adventure menu

Roxie Munro was a featured artists in KidLit TV’s premiere StoryMakers episode earlier this week — and with good reason. Not only has she written and illustrated more than thirty children’s books (including Hatch!, Busy Builders, and Mazeways), she’s also created a series of “Kids Interactive Walk-in Story Books” with affiliated apps and three stand-alone […]

Draw!

colon_draw

I’ve been a fan of Raúl Colón’s distinctive style for years, but this is the first of his books that I think has a really good chance at the Caldecott. It’s gotten starred reviews in The Horn Book, SLJ, Booklist, PW, and Kirkus. Not too shabby. But more than that, it just has an award-book […]

November Notes is here!

nov 14 notes

In November’s Notes from the Horn Book, K. T. Horning chats with Sharon G. Flake about her new middle-grade mystery Unstoppable Octobia May. In this issue, you’ll also find more wacky middle-grade adventures pals in new picture books books around the world for primary and intermediate readers YA nonfiction about social justice Read the issue […]

Cece Bell on El Deafo

eldeafo

In the November/December 2014 Horn Book Magazine, reviewer Deirdre Baker asked Cece Bell about her graphic novel memoir El Deafo — which is told entirely with anthropomorphic bunnies. Read the starred review here; see more grrl-power graphic novels here. Deirdre F. Baker: Why did you choose to tell your autobiography with bunny characters? Cece Bell: […]

Default in our stars

50 Books Every Child Should Read

This week’s Entertainment Weekly has a list of “50 Books Every Kid Should Read” (view PDF here). Given that it strives to contain both classics (Where the Wild Things Are) as well as modern favorites (The Fault in Our Stars); and pop hits (The Hunger Games) along with critics’ darlings (Roll of Thunder, Hear My […]

Fantasy and science fiction

fantasy2014

This week’s topic is “Beyond the World We Know” — a category that encompasses an extensive range of books, from magical realism to science fiction to the far away places of imaginary worlds. Jane Langton’s classic piece on fantasy from the 1973 Horn Book, “The Weak Place in the Cloth” provides an apt and lovely […]

Far Far Away

far far away

Folk and fairy tales have long been fodder for writers, who re-tell, borrow, fracture, and invert the original stories in their own. I would suggest that Tom McNeal bends the relationship between fairy tale and novel in a new way in his suspenseful tale Far Far Away. What do others think about blending of new […]

Feed

feed

At first perusal, M.T. Anderson’s Feed is an entertaining tale of privileged futuristic teens who spend spring break on the moon. Their carelessness about the environment, their pitiful lack of knowledge, and technology-induced overstimulation seems so exaggerated as to invite easy laughter. Not far into the book, however, we start to recognize every aspect of […]