Haunted home

Homecoming1948

With the theme “Homecoming,” Simmons College’s Center for the Study of Children’s Literature held its biennial Institute this weekend; the Horn Book staff provides an excellent summary. (And Shoshana Flax has written a poem in its honor, too.) The funniest moment was when Jack Benny Gantos quipped about Go Set a Watchman, whose publication, he said […]

The People in My Neighborhood: One Author/Illustrator’s Rambles Around Brooklyn

With apologies to Margaret Wise Brown.

The Place Brooklyn: home to skinny jeans, artisanal pickles, that famous bridge, and yes… one of the biggest children’s book communities in the world. And I’m one of those authors that ends his jacket flap copy with “…lives and works in Brooklyn.” Here’s a brief history, as well as an insider’s guide, to this kid-lit […]

2015 Simmons Summer Institute: Homecoming

Roger Sutton talks with Bryan Collier.

What an invigorating weekend here on the Simmons College campus, as current students, alums, authors, illustrators, teachers, librarians, academics, booksellers, book lovers, etc., etc., etc., came together for the 2015 Summer Children’s Literature Institute: Homecoming. Some highlights are below, and in no particular order. We know. We tried to make it brief. But we just […]

Goodnight, Paresky Room

Bird-Window-Chil-Institute.ashx

With apologies to Margaret Wise Brown, a recap of Homecoming inspired by the homiest book of them all. In the Paresky room, there were tweeting phones and thought balloons with pictures of the places we’ve dwelt, and with whom. There were dogs and bears,1 and familiar chairs, and pulses2 that quicken at art, not at […]

You had us at artisanal pickles.

funny-pickle-dill-pickles

Urban inferiority complex be damned! We Bostonians enjoy artisanal pickles and ironic facial hair as much as the next folks. That’s why we’re pleased to present author/illustrator Stephen Savage’s article on the people in his Brooklyn neighborhood. Or, as we like to call it, “the new Somerville.” We’re so psyched, in fact, that we’ve decided […]

A Second Look: It’s Like This, Cat

neville_it's like this cat

In late January 1964, a committee of twenty-three librarians from around the country met in a small room in a Chicago hotel to select the Newbery and Caldecott winners from a group of eligible books that had been published in 1963. In those years, the executive board members of ALA’s Children’s Services Division (now ALSC) […]

Remember what the dormouse said

Here Kitty

Doing some reading for my upcoming interview with Bryan Collier tomorrow at the Simmons Institute, I got to spend a beautiful afternoon at the even more beautiful new children’s room at BPL. You should go see it. But if they ever legalize pot in this state there’s going to be a line out the door […]

Alice: 150 Years of Wonderland

5. Alice Growing Tall

As may be evident from the name of my blog (educating alice) and recent Horn Book article (“Alice, the Transformer”), I’m a lifelong fan of Lewis Carroll’s Alice books. Naturally, I’m having a blast celebrating this year’s 150th anniversary of the publication of the first book, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, along with other people all […]

Can’t buy me love

Rejects

The Gawker debacle has been very entertaining. I read and respect the site too much to enjoy the clusterfuck in a schadenfreudey kind of way, but I am enjoying the intellectual stimulation provided by the whole host of journalism questions set bristling. What’s a public figure? Was the subject in question a public figure, or a behind-the-scenes media […]

#Stuffwhitepeoplelike: Go Set a Watchman

US_cover_of_Go_Set_a_Watchman

The Harpers Lee and Collins have certainly presented readers with a lively spectacle these past six months with the promise of another novel by the famous first-novelist-forever Lee. Go Set a Watchman was written  and submitted to Lippincott before To Kill a Mockingbird (published in 1960). Opinion seems to be divided as to whether Watchman should be considered […]