Photos from 2015 Boston Globe-Horn Book Awards and Horn Book at Simmons

Roger Sutton's welcoming remarks. Photo: Aram Boghosian.

Correct us if we’re wrong, but we thought this year’s Boston Globe-Horn Book Awards and Horn Book at Simmons Colloquium: Transformations was fab! Engaging, thought-provoking, heart-tugging, funny — the eloquent speeches (to be published in the January/February 2016 Horn Book Magazine), panel discussions, breakout sessions, and casual conversations left attendees transformed. Susan Cooper’s caterpillar-to-butterfly soup. […]

Wake me up when it’s all over


I confess to feeling nonplussed when the publicist wrote to see if “Horn [ed note: AARGH] will review The Rabbit Who Wants to Go to Sleep,” the self-published bestseller that Random House picked up for a rumored seven-figure advance. I mean, yes, the Horn BOOK will review it in the Spring 2016 Horn Book Guide […]

2015 Horn Book at Simmons Colloquium timeline

Roger Sutton and the Horn Book at Simmons editors panel: "It's a manuscript until I say it's a book." Photo: Shoshana Flax.

On Saturday, October 3rd, we held our fifth annual Horn Book at Simmons Colloquium, with the theme “Transformations.” Miss the fun? We’ve compiled a timeline of the day’s highlights based on tweets by our staff and other attendees. See Friday’s ceremony timeline here. 9:07 am: Good morning! We’re ready for a full day of great […]

2015 BGHB ceremony timeline

The winners and honorees. Photo: Aram Boghosian.

Did you miss the Boston Globe–Horn Book Awards on Friday, October 2nd? Just want to relive the excitement of the ceremony? We’ve compiled a timeline of the evening’s highlights based on tweets by our staff and other attendees. See Saturday’s Horn Book at Simmons Colloquium timeline here.   5:43 pm: @jescaron: The crowd is gathering! […]

Boats for Papa

boats for papa

This is one gorgeous picture book. It’s perhaps even more remarkable, given that it’s by a debut artist. Since its publication last June, it has gotten lots of love. And even more love. Most reviews refer to the way the story tugs at the heartstrings: “A weeper.” “Heart-breaking.” I have to say that the message I took away […]

Preview November/December 2015 Horn Book Magazine

November/December 2015 Horn Book Magazine

Cover art from Samurai Santa: A Very Ninja Christmas by Rubin Pingk. Elissa Gershowitz and Martha V. Parravano talk with outgoing Ambassador for Young People’s Literature Kate DiCamillo. Field Notes: Author A.S. King on helping readers flourish at an Irish adult literacy center. The Writer’s Page: The method to the madness in Matt Phelan’s graphic […]

The schools that need libraries the most


A few months ago, fellow Lolly’s Classroom blogger Randy Ribay made a compelling argument about why schools still need libraries and the wonderful librarians who keep them running smoothly. I agree wholeheartedly with his conclusion that “a school without a library is like a body without a soul.” Further, I believe that lack of access […]

Beyond the Pluto Problem


Perusing Debbie’s Reese’s  provocative (to me, anyway!) and useful site American Indians in Children’s Literature, I came across a comment she made referencing and linking to the Texas State Library’s guide to weeding, CREW: A Weeding Manual for Modern Libraries (link goes to a pdf). Last revised in 2012 by my most respected colleague and […]

The Bear Ate Your Sandwich

sarcone-roach_bear ate your sandwich

I wasn’t aware of Julia Sarcone-Roach until we reviewed  Subway Story back in 2010. What strikes most immediately about her art is the light. She achieves a luminous quality using opaque paint on paper that many watercolor artists would surely envy. According to the small print, she is using acrylics — a medium that can […]

Kidlit cares some more


Recently, as Siân tore her eyes away from Patrick Ness’s Twitter feed to tell us, a whole bunch of people, many of them children’s and YA authors, got together and raised a skyrocketing sum for Save the Children to aid Syrian refugees. Astounding as this example was, it’s not the only case of the kidlit […]