On crossing over: straight from the horses’ mouths

mezrich_mouse

Why do some authors “cross over” from writing adult to children’s books or children’s to adult? To find out, we went straight to the source. Shopaholic series author Sophie Kinsella (“The Queen of Romantic Comedy”), author of Finding Audrey — her first YA! — graciously submitted to our Five Questions treatment (sad to say she’s […]

Five questions for Sophie Kinsella: Crossover Week edition

Photo: John Swannell.

Sophie Kinsella, author of the Shopaholic series for adults, is known as “The Queen of Romantic Comedy.” Her new book, Finding Audrey, is her first foray into YA territory…and it’s a good one. Kinsella graciously submitted to The Horn Book’s Five Questions treatment during Crossover Week. 1. Your portrayal of anxiety disorders is so vivid […]

If you only had a brain

scarecrow-in-field

Farah Mendlesohn called my attention to this bit of fuckwittery from The Guardian, in which their art critic Jonathan Jones opines that the late Terry Pratchett wrote “trash” while the equally late Günter Grass was a “true titan of the novel,” so why is everyone more sad about the passing of Sir Terry? The dumbness of this point–let’s […]

What ELSE do you do?: five questions for Deborah Taylor

Deborah Taylor is third from the left in this 2014 photo of the "Cincy Gang." Photo by Alison Dougherty Berkowitz

This series of interviews debuted last spring with five questions for author T.A. Barron; now I’m following it up with five more for one of my favorite librarians, Deborah Taylor, coordinator of school and student services for the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore. Deb and I have been friends for more than thirty years since […]

Editorial: Read Before You Write

simmons

A member of the child_lit listserv recently posted a query which anyone who works with children’s books will find familiar: “A former student contacted me to ask if I could give her information about how to get started in writing and publishing children’s books.” Even given this little information, the good members of the listserv […]

Horn Book Magazine – September/October 2015

September/October 2015 Horn Book Magazine

Table of Contents Features “(Very Eventually) The Zena Sutherland Lecture” by Jack Gantos The stories behind the stories, and, characteristically, some other stories. “A Thousand Winters” by Kwame Alexander Working to make order out of chaos. “The Woman Who Drew Narnia” by Vicky Smith Through the wardrobe with Pauline Baynes. Columns Editorial “Read Before You […]

My weekend reviews

z_for_zachariah

Friday night–When Robert C. O’Brien’s 1975 YA Z for Zachariah made it onto the silver screen forty years later, you’d think its post-apocalyptic setting and sturdy heroine would have been enough to give it currency but NO: the famous two-hander is now a lurve triangle, and–spoiler alert–the attempted rape, so controversial in its time, is glossed over […]

Crossover authors, pt. 1

alexie_lone ranger and tonto fistfight in heaven

Is there a better feeling than discovering a new book by a favorite author? How about discovering a whole bunch of books you haven’t read yet by that author? Maybe you’re familiar with their work for adults, but didn’t realize they wrote for younger readers as well, or vice versa. For example (in alphabetical order […]

Crossover Week @ The Horn Book

austenland

“I’m reading Austenland,” said boss-man Roger Sutton one day. “It’s a grownup book by that fantasy author who won a Newbery Honor. She did those fairy-tale graphic novels too. You know? Shannon Hale.” And from there sprang Crossover Week @ The Horn Book. Because it’s not just Shannon Hale. Lots of children’s authors have written […]

James E. Ransome on Granddaddy’s Turn

bandy_granddaddy's turn

In our July/August issue, reviewer Robin Smith asked James Ransome about the challenge of illustrating difficult subject matter — specifically, voting disenfranchisement — for picture-book readers in Granddaddy’s Turn: A Journey to the Ballot Box. Read the full review of Granddaddy’s Turn here. Robin Smith: How do you convey the seriousness and emotion of your […]