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Help! My newborn hates to read.

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By now, we all know the benefits of reading to children from birth. The emotional bonding, the language development, the cognitive skills. Plus, there’s a sleep benefit, as Dr. Robert Needlman of Reach Out and Read discussed at the Horn Book’s Fostering Lifelong Learners symposium a few years ago. Tiny babies need to learn to […]

Hbook Podcast 1.29 – Special Guest Anastasia Collins

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Podcast the 29th in which Roger and Siân chat with social work librarian and Horn Book reviewer Anastasia Collins about cultural (mis?)appropriation and bagels. Books we talk about Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight series Ghosts by Raina Telgemeier People we talk about Lionel Shriver Toni Morrison Links Simmons Lionel Shriver’s speech New York Times article Inappropriate Appropriation […]

Most peculiar

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Fans of the Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children series will recognize the title Tales of the Peculiar; it’s the book of folktales read aloud by protagonist Jacob and his fellow peculiar children in the trilogy. In the same vein as J.K. Rowling’s Tales of Beedle the Bard, Ransom Riggs’s new collection Tales of the Peculiar (Dutton, […]

On Cynthia Voigt’s “Have a Carrot” (from March/April 1997)

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“High on the list of favorite read-aloud books in the house where I was the Mommy is The Runaway Bunny.” Newbery Medalist (for Dicey’s Song) Cynthia Voigt reflects on the classic picture book by Margaret Wise Brown in her article, “Have a Carrot,” published in 1997 in the Horn Book Magazine Special Issue: “Family Reading.” […]

Freedom in Congo Square

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Do you ever think you know a lot about a topic and then open a book to read something completely new? That’s what happened when I read this offering from Carole Boston Weatherford and R. Gregory Christie. I thought I knew just about everything about slavery in the 1800s in our country, at least all […]

Welcome, families!

Family Reading

Welcome to The Horn Book’s newest blog, Family Reading, a place to find children’s book recommendations, vigorous discussion and debate, advice, and humor about sharing books in the home. We are using both the words family and reading in the broadest possible sense. If, as Sister Sledge sings it, “We Are Family,” then “family” expands […]

Ladies and Gentlemen, Start Your Engines

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Thanks for chiming in with the books you are excited about! I still have the feeling that The Book has not been mentioned yet…no reason for that feeling, really, but I just think I am missing something. (I know, for instance, that new books illustrated by Javaka Steptoe, Jerry Pinkney, and Ashley Bryan are forthcoming.) […]

Happy 100th birthday, Roald Dahl!

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Roald Dahl wrote a lot, from short stories for adults to fantastical novels for kids. But what I love best about his work is the poetry, which he often tucked into his novels in the form of characters bursting into song. (Those Oompa Loompas had songs in the books with nary a “doopity doo.”) So […]

Five questions for Vera Brosgol

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Vera Brosgol’s 2011 YA debut was Anya’s Ghost (Roaring Brook/First Second, 12–16 years), a graphic novel about a quirky friendship — between a girl and a ghost. Her first picture book, Leave Me Alone! (Roaring Brook, 5–8 years), has a similarly wry and witty tone and highlights a point of view not always seen in […]

How I Discovered Young Adult Poetry – The Zena Sutherland Lecture

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A couple of weeks ago, at a dinner with several poets, one of them said, “You’re lucky, Marilyn: you know how to write poems for the young adult audience.” I laughed and told him he was entirely wrong. I have absolutely no idea how to write for the young adult audience. I just write what […]