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Week in Review, December 8th-12th

Week in Review

This week on hbook.com…  December’s Notes from the Horn Book: Special Issue: Fanfare! Reviews of the Week: Picture Book: What There Is Before 
There Is Anything There: A Scary Story by Liniers — plus a Q&A for the author/illustrator Fiction: Murilla Gorilla and the Hammock Problem by Jennifer Lloyd; illus. by Jacqui Lee Folklore: My Grandfather’s Coat […]

Books mentioned in the December 2014 issue of Notes from the Horn Book

Picture books Sam & Dave Dig a Hole by Mac Barnett, illus. by Jon Klassen, Candlewick, 5–8 years. My Bus written and illus. by Byron Barton, Greenwillow, 2–4 years. The Baby Tree written and illus. by Sophie Blackall, Penguin/Paulsen, 3–7 years. Draw! written and illus. by Raúl Colón, Simon/Wiseman, 5–8 years. Gaston written by Kelly […]

Week in Review, December 1st-5th

Week in Review

This week on hbook.com… Horn Book Fanfare, our choices for the best books of 2014 Starred reviews coming in the January/February 2015 Horn Book Magazine January/February 2015 Horn Book Magazine preview Reviews of the Week: Picture Book: Flora and the Penguin by Molly Idle Fiction: Gracefully Grayson by Ami Polonsky Nonfiction: The Right Word: Roget and […]

Starred reviews, January/February 2015 Horn Book Magazine

from ONCE UPON AN ALPHABET by Oliver Jeffers, from oliverjeffers.com

The following books will receive starred reviews in the January/February 2015 issue of the Horn Book Magazine. Coming this Wednesday: Fanfare, our choices for the best books of 2014. Once Upon an Alphabet; written and illustrated by Oliver Jeffers (Philomel) The Bear Ate Your Sandwich; written and illustrated by Julia Sarcone-Roach (Knopf) Supertruck; written and illustrated by […]

Preview January/February 2015 Horn Book Magazine

January/February 2015 Horn Book Magazine

Horn Book Fanfare: Our choices for the best books of 2014. Coverage of the 2014 Boston Globe–Horn Book Awards: judges’ remarks, speeches, photos. A Second Look: Barbara Bader examines The Planet of Junior Brown. Elissa Gershowitz on “What Makes a Good Award Acceptance Speech?” The Horn Book‘s (unsolicited) advice. Audrey M. Quinlan asks, “What Makes […]

Week in Review, November 24th-28th

Week in Review

This week on hbook.com… The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 movie review November’s Nonfiction Notes: social change, how things work, indigenous cultures, geography and maps, medicine and the human body Reviews of the Week: Picture Book: A Perfectly Messed-Up Story by Patrick McDonnell Fiction: Nuts to You by Lynne Rae Perkins Nonfiction: Little Melba and 
Her Big […]

Week in Review, November 17th-21st

Week in Review

This week on hbook.com… Naomi Shihab Nye Talks With Roger Jim Arnosky’s “Remembering Trina Schart Hyman” on the tenth anniversary of her death Congratulations to Jacqueline Woodson on her National Book Award for Brown Girl Dreaming! Here’s our starred review. Reviews of the Week: Picture Book: The Book with No Pictures by B. J. Novak […]

Review of Brown Girl Dreaming

woodson_brown girl dreaming

 Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson Intermediate, Middle School    Paulsen/Penguin 328 pp.    8/14    978-0-399-25251-8    $16.99    g Here is a memoir-in-verse so immediate that readers will feel they are experiencing the author’s childhood right along with her. It starts out somewhat slowly, with Woodson relying on others’ memories to relate her (1963) birth and infancy in […]

Week in Review, November 10th-14th

Week in Review

This week on hbook.com… November’s Notes from the Horn Book: 5Q for Sharon G. Flake, more wacky middle-grade adventures, pals in new picture books, around-the-world primary and intermediate, YA nonfiction about social justice Reviews of the Week: Picture Book: The Way to the Zoo by John Burningham Fiction: The Red Pencil by Andrea Davis Pinkney; illus. […]

From the Editor – November 2014

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Please permit me to highlight two of the titles reviewed in this issue of Notes from the Horn Book, alike only in their consideration of the friendship possible between the old and the young, and — refreshingly — their resistance of current splashy publishing trends. That The Farmer and the Clown is wordless is the […]