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Ling and Ting | Class #2, 2016

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This is one of two early readers (a.k.a. easy readers) for our second class. At the end of our last class, we talked about the difference between picture books and easy readers. How well do you think this book works in the early reader genre? Clearly it’s for somewhat more fluent readers than the Elephant […]

Children’s lit class starts this week

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The first day of my children’s lit class at Harvard Ed School will be this Thursday, March 24. Once again, we are hoping you will all help us discuss our readings here on the blog. The students will be required to post comments (short ones, I hope!) and the more comments we can get from […]

Where the Wild Things Are | Class #1 2016

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For our first class this year, we are again reading Where the Wild Things Are, a picture book that is now a classic, but was controversial in its day. Every year there are a handful of students who have never read this book. For those who know it well, I’m interested in hearing whether you […]

Mirror by Jeannie Baker | Class #1, 2016

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Wordless books present an interesting challenge to adults who share them with children. Is there a right way to read them? The great children’s literature specialist Rudine Sims Bishop has written about books for children needing to be both windows and mirrors. This book seems to me to be the epitome of that idea. There’s […]

Who should we follow?

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Now that Lauren’s adolescent lit class is over, I have a scant two weeks to put the finishing touches on my children’s lit module. Harvard has a new web tool, so I have to re-create my old links page from scratch, starting with social media recommendations. The problem is, I’m a bit of a dinosaur […]

Last class | Class #6, 2016

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While different in content and audience, both books this week take an honest look at mistake-making and forgiveness. Rebecca Stead explores dearly held friendships at a time of tremendous growth and change (seventh grade!). In his confessional memoir for older readers, Jack Gantos opens up about a disastrous adolescent decision that ultimately leads to his […]

Hole in My Life | Class #6, 2016

Hole in My Life

A beloved author for children, Jack Gantos takes a risk in revealing his naïve involvement in drug smuggling and subsequent prison time as a young man. Is there value in engaging so honestly with young adult readers over controversial topics? How might they react to this work of nonfiction?

Goodbye Stranger | Class #6, 2016

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Stead seems to really get this age group, changing relationships, and the time when the wrong move can seem like the end of the world. How does she balance the drama of this experience with respect and care for her characters and readers?

Illustrated books | Class #5, 2016

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This week’s class (March 1, 2016) focuses on visual literacy: pictures in young adult literature, in works of both fiction and nonfiction. The prompts below address the role of these books in the classroom; you might also respond to the interplay of text and pictures (or wordlessness), or to whatever engages you most about these […]

Two picture books | Class #5, 2016

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     The Arrival by Shaun Tan (Scholastic, 2007) The Wall: Growing Up Behind the Iron Curtain by Peter Sís  (Farrar, 2007) Though not the typical purview of adolescents, sophisticated picture books such as these offer rich rewards for readers/viewers with an experienced eye. Consider prior knowledge older students can bring to these works and connections […]