The Horn Book http://www.hbook.com Publications about books for children and young adults Wed, 26 Nov 2014 17:37:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.5 Review of Little Melba and 
Her Big Trombone http://www.hbook.com/2014/11/choosing-books/review-of-the-week/review-of-little-melba-and-%e2%80%a8her-big-trombone/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/11/choosing-books/review-of-the-week/review-of-little-melba-and-%e2%80%a8her-big-trombone/#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 16:00:35 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=43584 Little Melba and 
Her Big Trombone by Katheryn Russell-Brown; 
illus. by Frank Morrison Primary    Lee & Low    40 pp. 7/14    978-1-60060-898-8    $18.95    g From the time she was a little girl, Melba Liston loved music, especially the jazz music that surrounded her while she was growing up, first in Kansas City and then in Los […]

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russell brown little melba Review of Little Melba and 
Her Big TromboneLittle Melba and Her Big Trombone
by Katheryn Russell-Brown; 
illus. by Frank Morrison
Primary    Lee & Low    40 pp.
7/14    978-1-60060-898-8    $18.95    g

From the time she was a little girl, Melba Liston loved music, especially the jazz music that surrounded her while she was growing up, first in Kansas City and then in Los Angeles. Given the opportunity to learn to play a musical instrument at age seven, she chose the trombone. It was not a traditional choice for a girl, especially a small girl whose arms weren’t even long enough yet to push out the slide. But Melba wasn’t a traditional girl. She persisted, and with the support of her family and her teachers, she excelled. By age seventeen, she was ready to tour as a member of jazz trumpeter Gerald Wilson’s new band. She played with the greats, including Dizzy Gillespie and Quincy Jones, and was almost always the only woman in the band (except on her tour with Billie Holiday). As a woman, she faced as many barriers and challenges as she did as an African American musician traveling through the mid-twentieth-century South. But Melba was highly sought out, as a band member, session musician, composer, and arranger. Russell-Brown’s account of her subject’s early life is as smooth and stimulating as a Liston trombone solo, and will leave readers wanting to know more about the woman and her music. Morrison’s oil paintings, in his trademark elongated, angular style, perfectly convey the jazz scene and, of course, Melba’s amazing horn.

From the November/December 2014 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

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#HBWhoSaidIt? quotes http://www.hbook.com/2014/11/blogs/out-of-the-box/whosaidit-quotes/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/11/blogs/out-of-the-box/whosaidit-quotes/#respond Wed, 26 Nov 2014 15:30:08 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=42764 Every day in November we’re tweeting (from @HornBook) a quote about the creative process, by a children’s author or illustrator. Can you guess who said it? Click the hashtag #HBWhoSaidIt? for the latest tweets. See all “Who Said It?” quotes and their sources below. 11/3: “When I’m not writing well, I can barely remember what […]

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Every day in November we’re tweeting (from @HornBook) a quote about the creative process, by a children’s author or illustrator. Can you guess who said it? Click the hashtag #HBWhoSaidIt? for the latest tweets. See all “Who Said It?” quotes and their sources below.

11/3: “When I’m not writing well, I can barely remember what it feels like to write well. When that happens, I read.” Answer here.

11/4: “I kept a comics journal [as a kid]. I used to draw a comic about my day, pretty much every day.” Answer here.

11/5: “Writing is, like any athletics, a learned skill refined only by consistent and strenuous workouts over time.” Answer here.

11/6: “For genre to work best…you must have basilisk stories and jealous ex-husband stories and cancer stories.” Answer here.

11/7: “I do my research the same way for every book I write. I start with books; I do the reading.” Answer here.

11/10: “PLEASE! Oh, PLEASE! Make us a book that reflects the powerful, determined, articulate, smart men we are.” Answer here.

11/11: “Illustrators are notoriously good at giving speeches.” Answer here.

11/12: “It’s always a bit of a shock to get pulled out from behind my lonely drawing desk and plopped down in front of people, let alone a crowd.” Answer here.

11/13: “I would be a hermit in the Catskills who wrote textbooks.” Answer here.

11/14: “Writing this book, from the darkest place in my heart…made my heart less dark. That pain isn’t there for me to go back to.” Answer here.

11/17: “Now you see what we picture book authors are reduced to: ‘Come back to my place so I can show you Jon Klassen’s etchings.’” Answer here.

11/18: “It just hit me, that image. That’s where it started. And I thought, ‘There they are. Those are my characters.’” Answer here.

11/19: “I’ve published some sixty books covering a span of history from Confucius to Martha Graham. I’ve learned a lot. My views have evolved. I’m still practicing my craft.” Answer here.

11/20: “Sometimes you have to do an awful lot of writing to figure out exactly what it is you have to say, to find the story you want to tell and the path that works best for the telling.” Answer here.

11/21: “Children, architects, artists, and writers all know that play and work are one. This project allowed a wide space for my play.” Answer here.

11/24: “As Scott McCloud says in Making Comics, ‘There are no rules.’ When it comes to comics, there is no The Way.” Answer here.

11/25: “I think about words a lot. I need words. I need written-down, black-on-white, printed words. Let me count the ways.” Answer here.

11/26: “There was something about this moment that made me say to myself, ‘PICK UP THAT PENCIL and DRAW…’ A command to begin the journey.” Answer here.

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Review of Nuts to You http://www.hbook.com/2014/11/choosing-books/review-of-the-week/review-of-nuts-to-you/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/11/choosing-books/review-of-the-week/review-of-nuts-to-you/#respond Tue, 25 Nov 2014 16:00:58 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=43574 Nuts to You by Lynne Rae Perkins; illus. by the author Intermediate    Greenwillow    260 pp. 8/14    978-0-06-009275-7    $16.99 e-book ed.  978-0-06-226220-2    $8.99 Jed the squirrel’s odyssey begins dramatically when he is captured by a hawk and carried far away from his community. Using an “ancient squirrel defensive martial art,” he escapes and so begins his […]

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perkins nuts to you Review of Nuts to Youstar2 Review of Nuts to YouNuts to You
by Lynne Rae Perkins; illus. by the author
Intermediate    Greenwillow    260 pp.
8/14    978-0-06-009275-7    $16.99
e-book ed.  978-0-06-226220-2    $8.99

Jed the squirrel’s odyssey begins dramatically when he is captured by a hawk and carried far away from his community. Using an “ancient squirrel defensive martial art,” he escapes and so begins his journey home. Meanwhile, his two best friends Chai and TsTs set off to find him. In the course of these two (eventually converging) adventures, our heroes meet some helpful hillbillyish red squirrels, a threatening owl, a hungry bobcat, and a group of humans who are cutting brush and trees for power-line clearance, thus threatening the squirrels’ habitat. The three make it safely home only to face their biggest challenge: convincing their conservative community to relocate before the humans destroy their homes. Part satire, part environmental fable, and all playful, energetic hilarity, this story takes us deep into squirrel culture: their names (“‘Brk’ is pronounced just as it’s spelled, except the r is rolled. It means ‘moustache’ in Croatian but in squirrel, it’s just a name”); their games (Splatwhistle); and their wisdom (“Live for the moment…but bury a lot of nuts”). Perkins uses language like the best toy ever. The storm “howled and pelted, whirled and whined; it spit and sprayed and showered. Its winds were fierce. Its wetness was inescapable.” The book begs to be read aloud, except that you’d miss the wacky digressions, the goofy footnotes, and the black-and-white illustrations with their built-in micro-plots. Another completely original and exceptional package from Perkins.

From the November/December 2014 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

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Some people smarter than I http://www.hbook.com/2014/11/blogs/read-roger/people-smarter/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/11/blogs/read-roger/people-smarter/#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 15:52:42 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=43562 While putting my thoughts back in to fully bake–just kidding, I’ve ditched that recipe–I wanted to share some of the valuable links people provided in the comments to my last post and on Facebook. And let me say again how grateful I am for your bearing with me. I think a lot about what it […]

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baby foot in mouth 200px Some people smarter than IWhile putting my thoughts back in to fully bake–just kidding, I’ve ditched that recipe–I wanted to share some of the valuable links people provided in the comments to my last post and on Facebook. And let me say again how grateful I am for your bearing with me. I think a lot about what it means to be a man in children’s books (why, for example, do so many of us talk about book awards like they are sports?) but my post of last Friday was not only half-baked, it was clueless as to what was happening in the kitchen and the nation.

So here’s some reality. Jackie Woodson has issued a statement in which she is definitely taking the high road:

“I’d rather continue to move the dialogue forward in a positive light rather than a negative one. This is a moment when our country can grow and learn and better understand each other. It would be nice to put the energy back where it should be — on the books and what the books are saying and doing – Redeployment is an astounding novel, Glück is nothing short of an amazing poet. I don’t know Osnos’ book yet but I plan to read it. Brown Girl Dreaming is about writing and about the history of this country. But more than that, it’s about what this conversation should be — a coming to understanding across lines of race.”

Here is a link to Nikky Finney’s “Choking on a Watermelon.” And David Perry’s post, which was one of the first critiques I saw. Laura Ruby shared this beautiful post from Ashley Ford; and Sarah Hamburg provided some historical context with Ta-Nehisi Coates’ thoughts on Forest Whittaker’s encounter with racism in an UWS deli. And I am very grateful to have found a comparison-gainer, thanks to Kate Messner, in a Princeton freshman who has “checked his privilege and apologizes for nothing.”

Please also see relevant Horn Book resources, which Elissa and Katie began curating after we published Christopher Myers’s “Young Dreamers,” one of the most important essays I’ve seen come through this office and for which I will be forever grateful to Christopher for sending it our way.

That’s it for today–I am now off to engage in the annual bloody battle also known as the Fanfare discussion.

 

 

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Elizabeth, Queen of the Seas http://www.hbook.com/2014/11/blogs/calling-caldecott/elizabeth-queen-seas/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/11/blogs/calling-caldecott/elizabeth-queen-seas/#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 15:42:05 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=43273 Since Brian Floca won the Caldecott last year for Locomotive, you can bet this year’s committee will be taking a look at his 2014 picture book. Written by long-distance swimmer Lynne Cox, this is a factual account of a particularly incorrigible elephant seal and the Christchurch, New Zealand, community that eventually made way for her. […]

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cox elizabeth queen of the seas Elizabeth, Queen of the SeasSince Brian Floca won the Caldecott last year for Locomotive, you can bet this year’s committee will be taking a look at his 2014 picture book.

Written by long-distance swimmer Lynne Cox, this is a factual account of a particularly incorrigible elephant seal and the Christchurch, New Zealand, community that eventually made way for her. Cox doesn’t say just when this happened, but possibly as early as 1975 (the date of her most famous New Zealand swim), which would explain the older-looking cars. We do know that she heard the story from Michael and Maggie, a young brother and sister, and subsequently consulted an elephant seal specialist for more specific information.

What really matters for us — and for the Caldecott committee — is how her text and Brian Floca’s illustrations work to tell the story.

This is a very charming picture book. Floca’s ink and watercolor illustrations have a light touch, with none of the spectacle of Locomotive‘s art. But why should we expect anything flashy? Elizabeth’s story is slighter and cozier than the epic story of the Transcontinental Railroad. The text here has a light tone, and it’s really up to Floca to give Elizabeth her somewhat cheeky personality.

In case you’re not familiar with this book, it’s about an elephant seal — an animal that normally prefers the ocean — who swam up the Avon river in New Zealand and started showing up alongside a road in the city of Christchurch. When the seal decided that the middle of that road was an even better place to sun herself, people worried about accidents — either to the seal or to drivers — and tried three times to relocate her to the ocean, each time farther away. When she kept finding her way back (the last time from hundreds of miles away), they decided to let her stay, putting up a sign:

SLOW
ELEPHANT SEAL
CROSSING

Cox’s text is factual, with its only fanciful riffs coming from young Michael, who looks for Elizabeth every day and imagines that her two snorts are a greeting to him. Because of Floca’s illustrations, we do not doubt Michael’s interpretation.

One thing I like very much is Floca’s choice (or perhaps the designer’s) to punctuate key moments in the story with hand-lettering. We first see this when the people of Christchurch decide that her regal nature deserves a regal name, christening her (in large cursive text) “Elizabeth, Queen of the Seas.” The same writing is used when Michael calls to Elizabeth and when he greets her after a long journey: “Elizabeth! You’re home!”

I particularly like Cox’s decision to end the book with a speculative section imagining what it might have been like for Elizabeth to return home that last time after such a long swim. Cox imagines her swimming and swimming through day and night, and this is where Floca’s art becomes transcendent. There’s a particular moonlit spread that is quiet but full of emotion, with dark trees looming on the bank and a light yellow moon-colored wake showing where Elizabeth is swimming.

The text and art match each other in tone throughout, but compared to the other books up for the Award this year, do you think this one is distinguished enough for the committee to honor it?

 

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The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 movie review http://www.hbook.com/2014/11/blogs/out-of-the-box/hunger-games-mockingjay-part-1-movie-review/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/11/blogs/out-of-the-box/hunger-games-mockingjay-part-1-movie-review/#respond Tue, 25 Nov 2014 14:00:23 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=43536 The team behind The Hunger Games film adaptations gets it. With plenty of explosions and covert operations to draw from in Suzanne Collins’s source material, Lionsgate Films’s The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 could have been just an action movie. Instead, the filmmakers’ decision to split the book into two movies allows the characters’ emotional […]

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mockingjay part 1 poster The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 movie reviewThe team behind The Hunger Games film adaptations gets it. With plenty of explosions and covert operations to draw from in Suzanne Collins’s source material, Lionsgate Films’s The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 could have been just an action movie. Instead, the filmmakers’ decision to split the book into two movies allows the characters’ emotional considerations their due.

The movie opens with Katniss (Jennifer Lawrence), airlifted from the Quarter Quell, now sequestered in District 13 to recover from her injuries and plan her next move. Long believed to have been destroyed by the Capitol, District 13 still exists as an underground enclave in a constant state of preparation for rebellion. Although 13 and its leader President Coin (Julianne Moore) ally with Katniss and the rebels who rescued her, it becomes obvious that the claustrophobic District 13 has flaws of its own. Moore’s portrayal gives Coin some sympathetic moments, but the speeches she delivers to cheering crowds make it clear that the Capitol doesn’t have a monopoly on propaganda.

In fact, a major part of Katniss’s role as the “Mockingjay,” the symbol of the rebellion, is to star in “propos,” or propaganda pieces, urging the discontented people of the districts to unite against the Capitol. Haymitch (Woody Harrelson), Katniss’s former mentor and one of the rebels, wisely points out that Katniss is at her best when she’s unscripted, so Coin sends Katniss to devastated districts — including her own — for filmmaker Cressida (Natalie Dormer) to capture her spontaneous responses to the Capitol’s offenses. Quickly, the propos inspire what had been small uprisings to become coordinated attacks, which meet swift and violent retaliation.

Meanwhile, Peeta (Josh Hutcherson) — who was taken hostage by the Capitol, along with other former victors, at the end of the Quarter Quell — repeatedly appears on Capitol TV, begging rebels to end the uprising before more people get hurt. As these appearances reveal that Peeta is being tortured, a frantic Katniss becomes more focused on saving Peeta’s life than President Coin would like her to be with so many other lives at stake. Katniss is also growing closer to Gale (Liam Hemsworth)… which brings me to the one aspect of the book I found a bit tiresome: Katniss understandably does a lot of brooding, but perhaps less understandably, she spends a lot of this high-stakes novel wondering whether Gale or Peeta is the man for her. The movie, though, manages to show her conflict through her actions, and through her reaction at one point when she thinks she’s lost both of them. Katniss’s internal debate (related in the novel through her first-person narration) doesn’t have a chance to weigh down the movie. And, as in the book, there are still moments of humor; Buttercup the cat steals the show a few times.

Did this novel of about the same length as its two predecessors need to be divided into two movies? Maybe not; scenes could have been shortened, similar incidents could have been combined, and ticket fees could have been forked over once instead of twice. But the plot of Mockingjay is more complicated, less self-contained, than the plots of the two previous installments. After all, no part of it takes place in an arena with a dwindling number of characters. If Mockingjay’s story had been rushed, what would’ve been lost would be characters’ emotional development. In both the book and the movie, every risk a character takes raises questions of that risk’s consequences for his or her loved ones. I’m glad the film made time for that.

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Last adolescent lit class http://www.hbook.com/2014/11/blogs/lollys-classroom/last-adolescent-lit-class/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/11/blogs/lollys-classroom/last-adolescent-lit-class/#respond Tue, 25 Nov 2014 11:01:13 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=43270 For our last class, students are reading The Fault in Our Stars, which I offer as a “dessert book” after their hard work this term, and also as a comparison love story to Eleanor and Park from our second week. The class will also read Katrina and Rachel’s take on “What Makes a Good Love […]

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green fault 189x300 Last adolescent lit classFor our last class, students are reading The Fault in Our Stars, which I offer as a “dessert book” after their hard work this term, and also as a comparison love story to Eleanor and Park from our second week. The class will also read Katrina and Rachel’s take on “What Makes a Good Love Story” (and their follow up post on Eleanor and Park). In their excellent round up, Katrina and Rachel ask, “What creates [the] magic” in a love story, the stuff that makes us “fall hopelessly in love alongside the characters”?

Hordes of adolescent (and adult) readers have fallen in love with TFIOS. What are the “magical” elements of this novel that make it so beloved? Does it share any with Eleanor and Park, or other great YA love stories? Or do the best love stories offer something unique? Feel free to add your own favorites to the conversation.

This week’s readings:

  • The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
  • “What Makes a Good Love Story” by Katrina Hedeen and Rachel L. Smith from Horn Book Magazine, May/June 2013
  • and addendum on Eleanor and Park from Out of the Box blog, April 17, 2013

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Books mentioned in the November 2014 issue of Nonfiction Notes from the Horn Book http://www.hbook.com/2014/11/choosing-books/books-mentioned-november-2014-issue-nonfiction-notes-horn-book/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/11/choosing-books/books-mentioned-november-2014-issue-nonfiction-notes-horn-book/#respond Mon, 24 Nov 2014 18:14:00 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=43533 Social change Captured History series Burgan, Michael Tank Man: How a Photograph Defined China’s Protest Movement Gr. 4–6     64 pp.     Capstone/Compass Point     2014 Library binding ISBN 978-0-7565-4731-8 Paperback ISBN 978-0-7565-4787-5 Nardo, Don Hitler in Paris: How a Photograph Shocked a World at War Gr. 4–6     64 pp.     Capstone/Compass Point     2014 Library binding ISBN 978-0-7565-4733-2 Paperback […]

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Social change

Captured History series

Burgan, Michael Tank Man: How a Photograph Defined China’s Protest Movement
Gr. 4–6     64 pp.     Capstone/Compass Point     2014
Library binding ISBN 978-0-7565-4731-8
Paperback ISBN 978-0-7565-4787-5

Nardo, Don Hitler in Paris: How a Photograph Shocked a World at War
Gr. 4–6     64 pp.     Capstone/Compass Point     2014
Library binding ISBN 978-0-7565-4733-2
Paperback ISBN 978-0-7565-4789-9

Cooper, Ilene A Woman in the House (and Senate): How Women Came to the United States Congress, Broke Down Barriers, and Changed the Country
Illustrated by Elizabeth Baddeley
Gr. 46    144 pp.    Abrams     2014
Trade ISBN 978-1-4197-1036-0

Kuklin, Susan Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out
High school     182 pp.     Candlewick     2014
Trade ISBN 978-0-7636-5611-9

Levy, Debbie We Shall Overcome: The Story of a Song
Illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton
Gr. K–3      32 pp.     Disney/Jump     2013
Trade ISBN 978-1-4231-1954-8

Runstedler, Nancy Pay It Forward Kids: Small Acts, Big Change
Gr. 46     64 pp.     Fitzhenry     2013
Trade ISBN 978-1-55455-301-3

 

How things work

Lightning Bolt Books: How Flight Works series

Boothroyd, Jennifer How Do Hang Gliders Work?
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     Lerner     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-0-7613-8970-5

Boothroyd, Jennifer How Do Helicopters Work?
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     Lerner     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-0-7613-8966-8

Boothroyd, Jennifer How Do Parachutes Work?
Gr. K–3     32 pp.      Lerner     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-0-7613-8968-2

Silverman, Buffy How Do Hot Air Balloons Work?
Gr. K–3     32 pp.      Lerner     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-0-7613-8969-9

Silverman, Buffy How Do Jets Work?
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     Lerner     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-0-7613-8967-5

Silverman, Buffy How Do Space Vehicles Work?
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     Lerner     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-0-7613-8971-2

Enz, Tammy The Amazing Story of Cell Phone Technology: Max Axiom STEM Adventures [Graphic Library: STEM Adventures series]
Illustrated by Pop Art Properties
Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Capstone     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4765-0137-6
Paperback ISBN 978-1-4765-3457-2

Blazers: See How It’s Made series

Hammelef, Danielle S. Building an Airplane
Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Capstone     2014
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4765-3978-2
Paperback ISBN 978-1-4765-5118-0

Omoth, Tyler Building a Motorcycle
Gr. 4–6      32 pp.     Capstone     2014
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4765-3977-5
Paperback ISBN 978-1-4765-5117-3

Macaulay, David Toilet: How It Works [My Readers series]
With Sheila Keenan
Gr. K–3    32 pp.     Square Fish/David Macaulay Studio     2013
Trade ISBN 978-1-59643-779-1
Paperback ISBN 978-1-59643-780-7

How Does My Home Work? series

Oxlade, Chris Heating
Gr. K–3     24 pp.     Heinemann     2012
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4329-6564-8
Paperback ISBN 978-1-43296569-3

Oxlade, Chris Water
Gr. K–3      24 pp.    Heinemann     2012
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4329-6567-9
Paperback ISBN 978-1-4329-6572-3

 

Indigenous cultures

Bruchac, James and Bruchac, Joseph Rabbit’s Snow Dance: A Traditional Iroquois Story
Illustrated by Jeff Newman
Gr. K–3
     32 pp.     Dial     2012
Trade ISBN 978-0-8037-3270-4

Charleyboy, Lisa, and Leatherdale, Mary Beth, Editors Dreaming in Indian: Contemporary Native American Voices
Middle school, high school
     130 pp.     Annick     2014
Trade ISBN 978-1-55451-687-2

Ellis, Deborah Looks like Daylight: Voices of Indigenous Kids
Middle school, high school    253 pp.     Groundwood     2013
Trade ISBN 978-1-55498-120-5

McLaughlin, Timothy P., Editor Walking on Earth & Touching the Sky: Poetry and Prose by Lakota Youth at Red Cloud Indian School
Illustrated by S. D. Nelson
Gr. 4–6     80 pp.     Abrams     2012
Trade ISBN 978-1-4197-0179-5

Ray, Deborah Kogan Paiute Princess: The Story of Sarah Winnemucca
Gr. 4–6     48 pp.     Farrar/Foster     2012
Trade ISBN 978-0-374-39897-2

 

Geography and maps

Map Smart series

Brasch, Nicolas Community Maps
Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Smart Apple     2012
Library binding ISBN 978-1-59920-413-0

Brasch, Nicolas Country Maps
Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Smart Apple     2012
Library binding ISBN 978-1-59920-414-7

Brasch, Nicolas Land and Sea Maps
Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Smart Apple     2012
Library binding ISBN 978-1-59920-415-4

Brasch, Nicolas World Maps
Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Smart Apple     2012
Library binding ISBN 978-1-59920-416-1

Pebble Books: My World series

Cane, Ella Countries in My World
Gr. K–3     24 pp.     Capstone     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4765-3122-9
Paperback ISBN 978-1-4765-3464-0

Cane, Ella Neighborhoods in My World
Gr. K–3     24 pp.     Capstone     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4765-3119-9
Paperback ISBN 978-1-4765-3461-9

Cane, Ella States in My World
Gr. K–3      24 pp.     Capstone     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4765-3121-2
Paperback ISBN 978-1-4765-3463-3

Kralovansky, Susan What Would You Do with an Atlas? [Super SandCastle: Library Resources series]
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     ABDO     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-61783-606-0

Mizielinska, Aleksandra Maps
Illustrated by Daniel Mizielinski
Gr. 4–6     110 pp.     Candlewick/Big Picture     2013
Trade ISBN 978-0-7636-6896-9

Walker, Sally M. Boundaries: How the Mason-Dixon Line Settled a Family Feud & Divided a Nation
High school     202 pp.     Candlewick     2014
Trade ISBN 978-0-7636-5612-6

 

Medicine and the human body

Arnold, Caroline Too Hot? Too Cold?: Keeping Body Temperature Just Right
Illustrated by Annie Patterson
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     Charlesbridge     2013
Trade ISBN 978-1-58059-276-6
Paperback ISBN 978-1-58089-277-3

Super Simple Body series

Halvorson, Karin Inside the Ears
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     ABDO     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-61783-610-7

Halvorson, Karin Inside the Eyes
Gr. K–3      32 pp.     ABDO     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-61783-611-4

Halvorson, Karin Inside the Heart
Gr. K–3      32 pp.     ABDO     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-61783-612-1

Halvorson, Karin Inside the Lungs
Gr. K–3      32 pp.     ABDO     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-61783-613-8

Jarrow, Gail Red Madness: How a Medical Mystery Changed What We Eat
Middle school, high school   192 pp.     Boyds/Calkins (Boyds Mills Press)     2014
Trade ISBN 978-1-59078-732-8

Murphy, Jim and Blank, Alison Invincible Microbe: Tuberculosis and the Never-Ending Search for a Cure
Gr. 4–6     149 pp.     Clarion     2012
Trade ISBN 978-0-618-53574-3

Ziefert, Harriet You Can’t See Your Bones with Binoculars!: A Book About Your 206 Bones
Illustrated by Amanda Haley
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     Blue Apple     2014
Trade ISBN 978-1-60905-417-5

Ziefert, Harriet You Can’t Taste a Pickle with Your Ear!: A Book About Your 5 Senses
Illustrated by Amanda Haley
Gr. K–3
     32 pp.     Blue Apple     2014
Trade ISBN 978-1-60905-418-2

These titles were featured in the November 2014 issue of Nonfiction Notes from the Horn Book.

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Medicine and the human body http://www.hbook.com/2014/11/choosing-books/recommended-books/medicine-human-body/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/11/choosing-books/recommended-books/medicine-human-body/#respond Mon, 24 Nov 2014 17:44:44 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=43428 Arnold, Caroline Too Hot? Too Cold?: Keeping Body Temperature Just Right Gr. K–3     32 pp.     Charlesbridge Illustrated by Annie Patterson. Arnold’s explanations of how humans and animals regulate their body temperatures are simple, accurate, and organized into major sections: “Our Bodies Keep Us Warm or Cool,” touches on features and mechanisms such as fat, sweating, […]

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arnold too hot too cold Medicine and the human bodyArnold, Caroline Too Hot? Too Cold?: Keeping Body Temperature Just Right
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     Charlesbridge

Illustrated by Annie Patterson. Arnold’s explanations of how humans and animals regulate their body temperatures are simple, accurate, and organized into major sections: “Our Bodies Keep Us Warm or Cool,” touches on features and mechanisms such as fat, sweating, and shrinking blood vessels; “What We Do to Be Warm or Cold” addresses behavioral techniques (sunbathing, migration, etc.). Patterson’s watercolors engagingly illustrate and expand the text. Glos.
Subjects: Natural History; Human body; Temperature; Animal behavior

halvorson inside the ears Medicine and the human bodyHalvorson, Karin Inside the Ears
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     ABDO

Halvorson, Karin Inside the Eyes
Gr. K–3      32 pp.     ABDO

Halvorson, Karin Inside the Heart
Gr. K–3      32 pp.     ABDO

Halvorson, Karin Inside the Lungs
Gr. K–3      32 pp.     ABDO

Super Simple Body series. Halvorson provides brief, accurate explanations of how human organs work. Clear diagrams, color photographs, and friendly illustrations contribute to an attractive look; open-ended questions lead readers to consider their own bodies and experiences. Clever, accessible hands-on activities using everyday materials aid understanding: simulate vocal cords with a balloon, explore hearing with a tin can phone, and so on. Glos.
Subjects: Medicine, Human Body, and Diseases; Human body—Lungs; Human body—Respiratory system

jarrow red madness Medicine and the human bodyJarrow, Gail Red Madness: How a Medical Mystery Changed What We Eat
Middle school, high school   192 pp.     Boyds/Calkins

In 1902, a young man in Georgia displayed symptoms of pellagra, a deficiency disease believed to be nonexistent in the U.S. Jarrow unfolds the suspenseful search for a cause of the South’s epidemic, as corn fungus, insect- and bird-borne parasites, and more were all blamed and rejected. Plentiful archival photos, many of victims, add emotional heft. Reading list, timeline, websites. Bib., glos., ind.
Subjects: Medicine, Human Body, and Diseases; Nutrition; Southern States; Epidemics; Diseases—Pellagra

murphy invinciblemicrobes 233x300 Medicine and the human bodyMurphy, Jim and Blank, Alison Invincible Microbe: Tuberculosis and the Never-Ending Search for a Cure
Gr. 4–6     149 pp.     Clarion

Tuberculosis has been a medical scourge through much of human history, and new drug-resistant strains keep the threat of a pandemic ever-present. This book brings young readers up to speed with a scientific explanation of the microbe as well as medical and social histories of the disease. Despite disparate elements, the information comes together cohesively for an engaging read. Illustrations and photographs are included. Bib., ind.
Subjects: Medicine, Human Body, and Diseases; Diseases—Tuberculosis; Microbiology; Epidemics

ziefert you cant see your bones with binoculars Medicine and the human bodyZiefert, Harriet You Can’t See Your Bones with Binoculars!: A Book About Your 206 Bones
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     Blue Apple

Ziefert, Harriet You Can’t Taste a Pickle with Your Ear!: A Book About Your 5 Senses
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     Blue Apple

Illustrated by Amanda Haley. Combining playful narration and factual information, these volumes introduce readers to the details of their bones and their senses. The formats are not identical: Bones catalogs the skeleton and the connections therein and includes X-ray images; Pickle features rhyming poems and questions for the reader as well as more variation in layout. In both, Haley’s loose-lined watercolors balance the text and add humor.
Subjects: Medicine, Human Body, and Diseases; Senses and sensation

From the November 2014 issue of Nonfiction Notes from the Horn Book.

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Geography and maps http://www.hbook.com/2014/11/choosing-books/recommended-books/geography-maps/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/11/choosing-books/recommended-books/geography-maps/#respond Mon, 24 Nov 2014 17:42:20 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=43426 Brasch, Nicolas Community Maps Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Smart Apple Brasch, Nicolas Country Maps Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Smart Apple Brasch, Nicolas Land and Sea Maps Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Smart Apple Brasch, Nicolas World Maps Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Smart Apple Map Smart series. This series looks at how maps are created, special features […]

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brasch community maps Geography and mapsBrasch, Nicolas Community Maps
Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Smart Apple

Brasch, Nicolas Country Maps
Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Smart Apple

Brasch, Nicolas Land and Sea Maps
Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Smart Apple

Brasch, Nicolas World Maps
Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Smart Apple

Map Smart series. This series looks at how maps are created, special features (e.g., grid, scale, colors) and symbols, and how to read maps. What makes a good map and new mapping technology are explored, as well as older ways of mapping. Much of the information is repeated among the volumes. Each busily designed book includes a map-making activity and an “Are You ‘Map Smart’?” quiz. Glos., ind.
Subjects: Geography and Exploration; Maps; Oceans

cane countries in my world Geography and mapsCane, Ella Countries in My World
Gr. K–3     24 pp.     Capstone

Cane, Ella Neighborhoods in My World
Gr. K–3     24 pp.     Capstone

Cane, Ella States in My World
Gr. K–3      24 pp.     Capstone

Pebble Books: My World series. These formulaic first nonfiction books provide new readers with information about each geographic division’s characteristics, similarities and differences among regions, and examples of natural features (e.g., mountains). Each double-page spread features two sentences on the right and a full-page stock photo or map on the left. These are accessible if very basic introductions. Reading list. Glos., ind.
Subjects: Geography and Exploration; Neighborhoods; United States

kralovanksy what would you do with an atlas Geography and mapsKralovansky, Susan What Would You Do with an Atlas?
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     ABDO

Super SandCastle: Library Resources series. Staged photographs of young, enthusiastic “researchers” welcome primary-grade readers on a quick tour of atlases. Simple, easy-to-read text, sidebars, and labeled photos provide a brief introduction to atlases and the range of features they highlight . This overview is clearly organized, and the presentation is inviting. Glos.
Subjects: Geography and Exploration; Maps

mizielinska maps Geography and mapsMizielinska, Aleksandra Maps
Gr. 4–6     110 pp.     Candlewick/Big Picture

Illustrated by Daniel Mizielinski. Each map in this attractive book reveals an engaging mix of tourist sites, animals, traditionally dressed people, important figures such as Gandhi and Homer, products and cultural items (e.g., Japanese manga, Russian nesting dolls), as well as facts and figures. With a retro look reminiscent of old illustrated atlases, this browsable volume will lead to wanderlust.
Subjects: Geography and Exploration; Maps

walker boundaries Geography and mapsWalker, Sally M. Boundaries: How the Mason-Dixon Line Settled a Family Feud & Divided a Nation
High school     202 pp.     Candlewick

The exact location of the boundary between the colonies of Maryland and Pennsylvania was in dispute until Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon were hired in 1763 to solve the problem once and for all. Walker delves deeply into her topic, providing meticulous detail not only about surveying but also about colonial-era socio-politics. Numerous maps, diagrams, and illustrations are interspersed throughout the narrative. Websites. Bib., ind.
Subjects: North America; Southern States; Mason, Charles; Dixon, Jeremiah; History, American—Colonial life; Geography; Maryland; Pennsylvania; Maps

From the November 2014 issue of Nonfiction Notes from the Horn Book.

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