The Horn Book http://www.hbook.com Publications about books for children and young adults Tue, 16 Sep 2014 21:10:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.4 Does one size fit all? http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/read-roger/one-size-fit/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/read-roger/one-size-fit/#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 20:17:39 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=40923 Leonard Marcus gave a swell talk about Robert McCloskey last night, but what’s really sticking with me is a response he gave to a question at the end about ebooks. Size matters, he essentially said, when it comes to picture books and other books for young children. Of course, we all know this, but I […]

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Stephenson t CA0 popup1 Does one size fit all?

illus. by André da Loba from the New York Times

Leonard Marcus gave a swell talk about Robert McCloskey last night, but what’s really sticking with me is a response he gave to a question at the end about ebooks. Size matters, he essentially said, when it comes to picture books and other books for young children. Of course, we all know this, but I hadn’t thought about the point in the context where Leonard was placing it, that the size and shape of whatever ebook you’re reading is subsumed by the size and shape of whatever screen you’re reading it on. The difference between the board book, picture book and big book editions of Goodnight, Gorilla disappears in your e-reader edition (which–I just tried it–is a disappointing experience indeed). I’m thinking I may need to gin up a jeremiad for our Cleveland presentation on Friday.

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Jason Segel, we love you, man http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/out-of-the-box/jason-segel-love-man/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/out-of-the-box/jason-segel-love-man/#respond Tue, 16 Sep 2014 16:00:47 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=40828 On Friday Cindy and I went to see actor Jason Segel discuss his new middle-grade novel (cowritten with Kirsten Miller) Nightmares! The sold-out event was sponsored by the Harvard Book Store and the nonprofit writing organization 826 Boston (program coordinator Karen Sama led the conversation with Segel). Cindy loves How I Met Your Mother (even […]

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segel nightmares Jason Segel, we love you, manOn Friday Cindy and I went to see actor Jason Segel discuss his new middle-grade novel (cowritten with Kirsten Miller) Nightmares! The sold-out event was sponsored by the Harvard Book Store and the nonprofit writing organization 826 Boston (program coordinator Karen Sama led the conversation with Segel). Cindy loves How I Met Your Mother (even the ending!), I love Freaks & Geeks, and we both love The Muppets. Segel is also the guy you may have seen naked in the very funny Saving Sarah Marshall (which he also wrote), and he was one of the bromantic leads in I Love You, Man.

segel kids Jason Segel, we love you, man

Photo: Cynthia K. Ritter

Nightmares! is his first children’s book, and he kicked off the event by asking everyone in the audience under age fourteen to raise their hands (there were a few). Later on he asked for kid volunteers to come up and read aloud from the book, instead of reading himself, which could have backfired but was awesome. “I’m like the Pied Piper,” Segel quipped as a girl named Tessa, two boys named Sam, and a cutie little one named Lucas came up onstage to read. Afterward he told them, appreciatively, “You’re so much braver than I would have been at that age.”

segel Jason Segel, we love you, man

Photo: Cynthia K. Ritter

The audience participation didn’t stop there. He asked people to share their nightmares; his as a kid involved a witch nibbling his toes (“because I have delectable toes”) and being chased around Dracula’s castle (“it was more Rococo than I would have thought”) which happened so frequently that he discovered a secret room where he could hang out and play video games. (Side note, and there were a lot of those: as a kid, Segel wore a Superman cape under his clothes “just in case” and carried the MYST game book around with him. Also? He’s been 6’4” since age 12 and the other kids used to jump on his back and chant “Ride the oaf!”)

And then there was the singing. During the Q&A a woman nervously asked: “What’s your favorite show tune?” “It’s gotta be the confrontation from Les Miz. Do you know it?” “Um, yes (giggle giggle).” “Ok, do you want to do it? Which part are you going to sing?” She chose Javert, and Jason sang his heart out as Jean Valjean (here’s how he did it with Neil Patrick Harris). The evening ended on an amazing note for fans with Segel at the piano doing the Dracula song (“‘Die… die… die…’ ‘I cahhn’t'”).

segel critter Jason Segel, we love you, man

Cindy in the signing line

If this guy isn’t the nicest, most genuine-seeming Everydude in Hollywood, well, he must be a truly great actor (slash-master-manipulator), because he seemed really thrilled (“This is so much fun! Seeing those kids read up there, that’s the coolest thing ever”) and humbled to be there — even after a two-hour-plus signing line that Cindy waited on. Any “grown man” (he was in his late twenties at the time) who “burst into tears” upon seeing Kermit the Frog “in person” and who also cried while sitting in “kind of a rough pub in London” after finishing Winnie-the-Pooh is a-ok in my book. I’ll even forgive his publicist for ignoring my Five Questions request *cough cough.* Jason Segel, we love you, man.

Quotable dude

Nightmares! was originally a screenplay I wrote at age 21, after Freaks & Geeks ended and I was unemployed and thinking, “I’m going to have to live with my parents forever.”

When I was a kid, movies like Labyrinth and The Goonies and Roald Dahl’s books made me believe I might find buried treasure. There’s still magic out there. You can catch a kid at the right age to say: don’t forget there’s magic…Kids’ imaginations are so much better than what you can put onscreen.

My mentor Judd Apatow said to me, “You’re kind of a weird dude.” Also [after Segel played him the Dracula song] he said: “Don’t ever play that for anyone else ever again.”

I’m willing to sit through the fear of doing something badly to get to passable. I tell myself: “I’m bad at this… right now”…The only thing I’m afraid of is being unprepared.

Coraline really scared me, and I’m a grown man!

Audience question: Who was your favorite actor growing up? Answer: Kermit. When you’re a kid, Kermit is Tom Hanks, Jimmy Stewart.

I wrote The Muppets when I was in London. With all those double-decker buses and furry hats, it’s a very Muppet-y place…The Muppets are Monty Python to a kid.

I did a Muppets screening at the White House and got to meet Barack Obama. He shook my hand and said, “I love you, man,” and I said, “I love you too, Mr. President!” It gets worse. Then I said, “You should come to the screening. There will be free snacks,” and he said, “Yeah, that’s what I’m missing. Not being able to get free snacks.”

At the screenings, we’d have people fill out questionnaires — what did you like about the movie, what didn’t you like. Oh, and my character’s name was Gary. People said, I liked the music. I liked the story. I liked the puppets. One kid wrote: The thing I didn’t like: Gary’s face. I mean…it’s my face! What can I do?

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Review of The Scandalous Sisterhood of Prickwillow Place http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/choosing-books/review-of-the-week/review-scandalous-sisterhood-prickwillow-place/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/choosing-books/review-of-the-week/review-scandalous-sisterhood-prickwillow-place/#respond Tue, 16 Sep 2014 15:00:44 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=40841 The Scandalous Sisterhood of Prickwillow Place by Julie Berry Middle School    Roaring Brook    354 pp. 9/14    978-1-59634-956-6    $15.99    g This airy confection could not be more different from Berry’s most recent (and pitch-black) novel All the Truth That’s in Me (rev. 11/13). Part murder mystery, part girls’-school story, part dark drawing-room comedy (think Edwin Drood, […]

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berry scandalous sisterhood of prickwillow place Review of The Scandalous Sisterhood of Prickwillow PlaceThe Scandalous Sisterhood of Prickwillow Place
by Julie Berry
Middle School    Roaring Brook    354 pp.
9/14    978-1-59634-956-6    $15.99    g

This airy confection could not be more different from Berry’s most recent (and pitch-black) novel All the Truth That’s in Me (rev. 11/13). Part murder mystery, part girls’-school story, part dark drawing-room comedy (think Edwin Drood, Arsenic and Old Lace, or the 1980s movie Clue), the novel opens in 1890 England at Saint Etheldreda’s School for Young Ladies. The seven students — our heroines — are known throughout the book as Dear Roberta, Disgraceful Mary Jane, Dull Martha, Stout Alice, Smooth Kitty, Pocked Louise, and Dour Elinor. Their headmistress is Mrs. Plackett, but she’s dispatched in the second paragraph (by poison), followed soon afterward by her ne’er-do-well brother, Aldous. The young ladies spend the rest of the book trying to figure out whodunit while also concealing the deaths (burying the bodies in the vegetable garden; having Stout Alice impersonate Mrs. Plackett; bilking their parents for tuition) in order to remain together at the school. Berry takes her madcap seriously, never breaking character when it comes to the old-timey setting or details (a Strawberry Social is the unlikely occasion of a late-in-the-story death). The young ladies, too, are products of their time: each one’s burgeoning independence and coming-into-her-own — largely gained through the murder investigation and/or cover-up, some also through snagging a beau — is satisfying without being too anachronistic. An immensely entertaining, smart, and frothy diversion.

From the September/October 2014 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

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Books that inspire community http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/lollys-classroom/books-inspire-community/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/lollys-classroom/books-inspire-community/#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 10:01:23 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=40400 Lately — and by accident — I’ve been reading Spanish versions of many French-authored children’s picture books. For some reason, most of the books I’ve recently bought from bookstores in Lima and Buenos Aires to use for storytelling in Spanish were translated from French authors. I didn’t realize it at the time, but once I […]

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Lately — and by accident — I’ve been reading Spanish versions of many French-authored children’s picture books. For some reason, most of the books I’ve recently bought from bookstores in Lima and Buenos Aires to use for storytelling in Spanish were translated from French authors. I didn’t realize it at the time, but once I started to read them together I realized that they shared a strong message about the “we” instead of the “me.”

pedro y la luna Books that inspire communityThis prompted an informal search for other books that would have the same underlining message. For example, Pedro y la Luna by Alice Brière-Hacquet and Célia Chauffrey is about a boy who wants to bring the moon to his mom. To do so, he has to involve his entire community and beyond. Then there is the Portuguese story O Grande Rabanete by Tatiana Belinky. In it, a grandfather decides to plant radishes and progressively needs help with the harvest because of the radishes’ large size.

 Books that inspire communityI then tried to think about other books that send the message of doing things together for a common cause and couldn’t think of many other than the classic stories “The Pied piper of Hamelin” and “The Little Red Hen.” In the 1990s there was The Rainbow Fish by Swiss author-illustrator Marcus Pfister. A fish with the shiniest scales in the sea refuses to share his wealth and then becomes lonely. He rediscovers community only once he shares his scales. And of course, there is also The Lorax by Dr. Seuss, a book published in 1971 that depicts what happens to a verdant land when the “Once-ler” chops down all the truffula trees and drives the (Seussian) animals away. The last hope to rebuild the environment — and the community — is for a boy to plant the last remaining truffula tree seed.

shannon nodavid 224x300 Books that inspire communitySo much of children’s literature, especially today, is about common things that happen to kids, such as the boy a lost his bear and found it swapped in the forest in Where’s My Teddy? by Jez Alborough, or the boy who misbehaves with his mom in No, David! by David Shannon, or the classic Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, no Good Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst. The list is endless.

All this made me think about the often repeated phrase, “literature is life.” So, are these books a reflection of our society? Are children’s books in other societies a reflection of a more “communal” (we) society instead of a more self-centered (me) society? Or is it that younger children relate better to stories that have more of a personal narrative tone? Can anybody think about books that transmit this message in their original languages?

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Review of Hana Hashimoto, Sixth Violin http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/choosing-books/review-of-the-week/review-hana-hashimoto-sixth-violin/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/choosing-books/review-of-the-week/review-hana-hashimoto-sixth-violin/#comments Mon, 15 Sep 2014 15:25:01 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=40838 Hana Hashimoto, Sixth Violin by Chieri Uegaki; illus. by Qin Leng Primary    Kids Can    32 pp. 8/14    978-1-894786-33-1    $16.95 Despite her brothers’ teasing, little Hana plans to play her violin at the talent show. True, she’s only a beginner, but Hana is a stalwart and determined young lady, practicing every day and performing for any […]

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uegaki hana hashimoto sixth violin Review of Hana Hashimoto, Sixth ViolinHana Hashimoto, Sixth Violin
by Chieri Uegaki; illus. by Qin Leng
Primary    Kids Can    32 pp.
8/14    978-1-894786-33-1    $16.95

Despite her brothers’ teasing, little Hana plans to play her violin at the talent show. True, she’s only a beginner, but Hana is a stalwart and determined young lady, practicing every day and performing for any audience that will listen, including a framed picture of her grandfather. Ojiichan is her musical inspiration, a former orchestral violinist who, during Hana’s recent visit to Japan, played his instrument for her all through the day. In the genial, lighthearted illustrations, musical notes drift upstairs to wake Hana “as gently as sunshine”; waft through the “indigo evenings”; and cover her “like a blanket” as Ojiichan plays a lullaby. His violin also makes sounds — crickets, raindrops — and melodies that seem to encourage fireflies to dance. When Hana finally steps onto the talent-show stage (on a double-page spread that captures how long her walk to the microphone feels and the immensity of both stage and beyond), she is terrified. But she remembers her grandfather’s advice to do her best and proceeds to give an, ahem, memorable performance: Hana’s violin mimics the sounds of a (“squawky”) mother crow, a (yowling) cat, bees, cows, mice, frogs, and more. “And that,” she declares, “is how I play the violin.” The final illustration shows musical notes traveling out her bedroom window to Ojiichan. And that, folks, is how you tell a completely charming yet refreshingly unsentimental tale of an intergenerational bond of love.

From the September/October 2014 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

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Boston Teen Author Festival turns 3! http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/out-of-the-box/boston-teen-author-festival-turns-3/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/out-of-the-box/boston-teen-author-festival-turns-3/#respond Mon, 15 Sep 2014 14:00:43 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=40776 Emerson College students Renee Combs and Marisa Finkelstein (both former Horn Book interns, might I add) founded the Boston Teen Author Festival in 2012 as a smallish signing-and-panel event dedicated to “embracing YA.” Baby, look at you now: for its third year, BTAF will feature an unbelievable twenty-four guest YA authors from the Boston area, […]

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btaf logo Boston Teen Author Festival turns 3!Emerson College students Renee Combs and Marisa Finkelstein (both former Horn Book interns, might I add) founded the Boston Teen Author Festival in 2012 as a smallish signing-and-panel event dedicated to “embracing YA.”

Baby, look at you now: for its third year, BTAF will feature an unbelievable twenty-four guest YA authors from the Boston area, many of whom have participated previously.

  • M.T. Anderson
  • Amelia Atwater-Rhodes
  • Charlotte Johnson Bennardo
  • Josh Berk
  • Julie Berry
  • Cara Bertrand
  • Alexandra Bracken
  • Annie Cardi
  • Erin Dionne
  • Huntley Fitzpatrick
  • Emily Franklin
  • Esther Friesner
  • A.C. Gaughen
  • Sashi Kaufman
  • Kendall Kulper
  • Claire Legrand
  • Stewart Lewis
  • Cammie Mcgovern
  • Hillary Monahan
  • Diana Renn
  • Gregg Rosenblum
  • Laurie Faria Stolarz
  • Francisco X. Stork
  • Heather Swain

For the first time, a writing workshop (“Finding Your Writing Voice,” led by Lori Goldstein and Mackenzi Lee) will be offered, in addition to five panels and several signing opportunities. Books will be available for sale at the event through Porter Square Books. The schedule of events:

Writing Workshop 9:45-10:30
“Finding Your Writing Voice” led by Lori Goldstein and Mackenzi Lee
Signup in advance is required; please email BTAFworkshop@gmail.com with your interest and your party number.

Doors Open 10:45

Introduction 11:15

Meet the Authors! 11:30-12:15
A rapid-fire session where each author gets roughly one minute to introduce themselves and their book. This is a way to help those not familiar with all of the attending authors to choose which panels they’d like to attend later in the event. The rest of the panel will be filled with silly questions and bizarre answers.

Panel Session One 12:30 -1:15
CRIMINAL MINDS: Writing the bad guy. or
A WHOLE NEW WORLD: World building at its finest.

Lunch Break 1:15-2:00

Panel Session Two 2:00-2:45
PLATONIC IN LOVE: Writing strong non-romantic relationships. or
CHOOSE YOUR OWN ADVENTURE: Characters who forge their own destinies.

Signing 3:00-4:00

And the entire event is free — although registration for the workshop is required and an RSVP for the day is appreciated. See you Saturday, September 27th, at the Cambridge Public Library!

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Now you know what we think http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/calling-caldecott/now-know-think/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/calling-caldecott/now-know-think/#comments Mon, 15 Sep 2014 14:00:08 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=40821 So, now you know where the three of us are in September. I wonder where we will be in January? Now that Lolly, Martha, and I know one another’s favorites, we will put our schedule together and start yapping about books soon. Go through our three lists here, here and here if you want a hint […]

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So, now you know where the three of us are in September.

I wonder where we will be in January? Now that Lolly, Martha, and I know one another’s favorites, we will put our schedule together and start yapping about books soon. Go through our three lists here, here and here if you want a hint as to which books we are likely to discuss in the coming months. There will be many more, of course, as new books are published right through November and December; these will all be considered by the real committee, and we don’t want to miss a thing. We are going to do our best NOT to talk about books until you can actually find them in bookstores. (Speaking of bookstores — if you are lucky enough to have a local one, get your tush to that store and buy some of these titles! Your library will have a lot of them, but October and November books are going to be tough to find there.)

We have combed the comments so far and will discuss some of the books you guys have suggested, though we will never be able to discuss all of them. So, take a day or two to keep the suggestions coming! It’s especially helpful if you add a sentence or two to explain why you think a particular title should end up with a shiny sticker in January.

Besides talking about individual titles, we will also be discussing issues we see in the picture book world. Is there an issue or concern stuck in your craw that you want us to tackle? Make that suggestion in the comments as well. We do like to talk about Serious Picture Book Issues, but we don’t always know what issues concern you most.

So make suggestions, and we will shuffle our papers, toss the dice, and get chatting about Caldecott possibilities.

And just to add an air of panic to my fear of missing something, here is a list from HuffPo. There are titles I haven’t even heard of!

 

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Early days yet http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/early-days/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/early-days/#comments Fri, 12 Sep 2014 14:00:20 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=40644 Hello! Welcome back to all you Calling Caldecott devotees — and welcome to those here for the first time this fall. This is the final post of a week in which Robin, Lolly, and I are making preliminary lists of the picture books eligible for Caldecott recognition that have, early in the process, struck a chord with each of us. Perhaps a book looks like […]

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iridescence 246x300 Early days yetHello! Welcome back to all you Calling Caldecott devotees — and welcome to those here for the first time this fall. This is the final post of a week in which Robin, Lolly, and I are making preliminary lists of the picture books eligible for Caldecott recognition that have, early in the process, struck a chord with each of us. Perhaps a book looks like a definite contender; perhaps it presents something of significance to discuss; perhaps it’s simply a book one of us has fallen in love with. I’m sure you all have seen 2014 picture books that fall into one of those categories! And we hope to hear what they are. (Thanks for all the comments and suggestions so far.)

It’s not surprising that we haven’t listed all the same books; it’s also not surprising that there is substantial overlap. The same thing is likely happening with the actual Caldecott committee, as the members share their own suggestions for potential contenders.

So without further ado, here are some of the books that have caught my eye, my attention, and/or my love icon smile Early days yet so far:

The Farmer and the Clown (Beach Lane) by Marla Frazee. Yes, there is a lot of love for this book in the office, and for good reason. It’s a wordless book with a emotionally resonant story; significant character development; brilliant use of page turns to tell the story and show the passage of time — all achieved solely through pictures.

The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus (Eerdmans), illustrated by Melissa Sweet, written by Jen Bryant. In complete contrast: all about words; so many words organically incorporated into Sweet’s controlled-chaos collage illustrations. (Will someone on the committee feel the need to count them all? if so good luck!)

Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker (Chronicle) illustrated by Christian Robinson, written by Patricia Hruby Powell. A perfect marriage of form and content (ie, it’s dazzling on every level).

Viva Frida (Porter/Roaring Brook) illustrated and written by Yuyi Morales. A wholly original and daring distillation of the creative process; I can’t wait to hear what you all have to say about it.

Draw! (Simon) illustrated by Raul Colon. Very different in setting, palette, and style from last year’s honor book Journey, yet with intriguing similarities.

Winter Bees and Other Poems of the Cold (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) illustrated by Rick Allen, written by Joyce Sidman. Here it’s a toss-up as to which is stronger, the text or the art; take your pick.

The Iridescence of Birds: A Book about Henri Matisse (Porter/Roaring Brook) illustrated by Hadley Hooper, written by Patricia MacLachlan. The transformative power of art, made manifest; I love how the art captures the essence of, but doesn’t try to reproduce, Matisse’s work.

Sam and Dave Dig a Hole (Candlewick) illustrated by Jon Klassen, written by Mac Barnett. A true picture book (text and art working together interdependently) with sustained humor and enormous child appeal.

SUCH a preliminary list. From now on I’ll be busy tracking down the suggestions of my fellow Calling Caldecott bloggers and commenters: discovering new books, adding to the list, comparing and re-weighing and perhaps taking books off the list — just like the actual committee.

 

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Week in Review, September 8th-12th http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/news/week-review-september-8th-12th/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/news/week-review-september-8th-12th/#respond Fri, 12 Sep 2014 07:30:50 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=40807 This week on hbook.com… September’s Notes from the Horn Book: five questions for Christine Heppermann, YA girls on the edge, picture book sequels, primary nature nonfiction, and middle-grade friendship stories September children’s literature events Reviews of the Week: Picture Book: Draw! by Raúl Colón Fiction: Beetle Boy by Margaret Willey Poetry: Poisoned Apples: Poems for […]

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banner weekinreview 550x100 Week in Review, September 8th 12th

This week on hbook.com…

September’s Notes from the Horn Book: five questions for Christine Heppermann, YA girls on the edge, picture book sequels, primary nature nonfiction, and middle-grade friendship stories

September children’s literature events

Reviews of the Week:

Read Roger:

Out of the Box: Abhorsen read-alikes“: #waitingforClariel

Calling Caldecott: some early favorites from our three bloggers…

Lolly’s Classroom:

See overviews of previous weeks by clicking the tag week in review. Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook to keep up-to-date on our articles!

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Review of Picture This http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/choosing-books/recommended-books/review-picture/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/choosing-books/recommended-books/review-picture/#respond Thu, 11 Sep 2014 20:44:29 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=40797 Picture This: Perception and Composition by Molly Bang; illus. by the author Intermediate     Bulfinch/Little     141 pp. 9/91     Paper ed. 0-8212-1855-7     $12.95 With a forward by Rudolf Arnheim. If I could buy only one book this year, this would be the one. If I could take only one book on a long cavation, this would be […]

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bang picture this first ed Review of Picture Thisstar2 Review of Picture This Picture This: Perception and Composition
by Molly Bang; illus. by the author
Intermediate     Bulfinch/Little     141 pp.
9/91     Paper ed. 0-8212-1855-7     $12.95

With a forward by Rudolf Arnheim. If I could buy only one book this year, this would be the one. If I could take only one book on a long cavation, this would be it — plus, of course, some scissors and construction paper so that I could explore, with Molly Bang as guide, the range of emotions that can be elicited by the interplay of shapes, sizes, and colors on a page. Using the familiar story of “Little Red Riding Hood” as a touchstone, she translates characters and situations into abstract shapes: Red Riding Hood as a red equilateral triangle; the forest as a series of long vertical rectangles; the wolf as three long black triangles. By experimenting — adding pointed teeth and a lolling tongue to the suggested visage of the wolf or tilting the trees to achieve a more menacing atmosphere — she explains not merely what but how a picture means. This process affords the same inside into the creation of visual effects that John Ciardi’s How Does a Poem Mean (Houghton) provided for the art of poetry. Bang extends the analysis from part one into a series of principles in part two and adds an additional commentary on the function of placement and space. The concluding section contains exercises for further experimentation and analysis. One in particular suggests the interplay between visual and written communications: “Illustrate a poem or series of poems, using the same three or four colors but representing different moods.” A teacher could expand this idea into analysis of a poem or even the visualization of conflicting forces in a historical event. Picture This extends the imagination, encourages creativity, and helps readers reexamine their world and themselves from different perspectives. One sense that it has the power to change anyone willing to admit its magic. Such an unassuming little book to contain so much, but then truth and beauty need no adornment! MARY M. BURNS

From the July/August 1992 issue of The Horn Book Magazine. A new edition, entitled Picture This: How Pictures Work, was published in 2000.

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