The Horn Book http://www.hbook.com Publications about books for children and young adults Tue, 07 Jul 2015 04:25:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 SeptNotesLong http://www.hbook.com/2015/07/news/notes-from-the-horn-book/septnoteslong/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/07/news/notes-from-the-horn-book/septnoteslong/#respond Tue, 07 Jul 2015 01:44:06 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=4844 V O L U M E 4 , N U M B E R 9 • S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 1 In this issue Five questions for Leo Landry • Back to school • Size matters in picture books • Illustrated middle-grade fiction • YA historical fiction […]

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V O L U M E 4 , N U M B E R 9 • S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 1
In this issue

Five questions for Leo Landry Back to school Size matters in picture books Illustrated middle-grade fiction YA historical fiction (and one biography) From the Editor

For a list of books mentioned in this issue, see link below.
Masthead art © by William Steig, used with permission of Pippin Properties, Inc.

Five questions for Leo Landry

Leo LandryAuthor-illustrator Leo Landry, a twenty-year bookselling veteran of The Children’s Book Shop in Brookline, Massachusetts, is the creator of picture books (Space Boy; Eat Your Peas, Ivy Louise!), as well as chapter books (Fat Bat and Swoop; Sea Surprise); newly independent readers should line up for Grin and Bear It, his latest offering. In this short (just forty-eight pages) chapter book, joke-writing-genius Bear dreams of making his friends laugh. He’s got some awesome material, but he’s also got a problem: stage fright. Enter hummingbird Emmy, gifted at performing but not at joke writing; together they pool their talents and realize their dreams. Young readers will be a receptive audience for Landry’s gentle illustrations, accessible text, and first-grader-funny jokes (“What do little girl cubs wear in their hair? Bear-ettes!”).

1. Who or what was the inspiration for the character of Bear, and does he bear (get it?) any resemblance to you?

Leo Landry: Years ago, I took a stand-up comedy class to get over my anxiety about public speaking. The final class was a five-minute live performance at a local comedy club! My bit was about the things you find yourself saying or overhearing as an adult working in a children’s bookstore (such as how many times you might say the word bunny in a day or, in one case, being told by a mother, “it’s only little girl pee!”). I got through the five minutes, but I’m not sure I could do it again. “Write what you know,” people have always told me. And so Bear was born.

2. Your illustration style seems perfect for early chapter book readers; the pictures are spare and entertaining without being distracting. How do you find illustrating a book for this audience differs from picture book illustration?

LL: First, thanks! With early chapter books and early readers, a child relies on the pictures as clues to deciphering words in the story as he learns to read. I discovered this with my own daughter. The Green Queen by Nick Sharratt was the first book that she read on her own, and it was so simply drawn, no clutter, no distractions. So I try to do the same. With picture books, illustrators have the freedom to expand on a story, and even create a story-within-the-story in the artwork that you wouldn’t know if you just read the text alone.

3. What did managing a bookstore teach you about what works (and what doesn’t) in books for new readers?

LL: It certainly gave me an exposure to the genre as it grew over twenty years! When I first started working at The Children’s Book Shop, there was a rack of I-Can-Read and Dr. Seuss books, a handful of Patricia Reilly Giff’s Kids of the Polk Street School books, and David Adler’s Cam Jansen series. And that was it. Now there are so many more great individual books and series for early readers. I’m still partial to Syd Hoff (especially Grizzwold, another inspiration for Bear), who wrote many I-Can-Read books when I was learning to read forty-some years ago. My most favorite has got to be James Marshall’s series of books about Fox. The dialogue is so snappy and full of wit, and he really does make you laugh out loud.

4. Did you write Bear’s jokes yourself or did you enlist the help of six-year-old joke writers?

LL: As a kid, I used to go the library every day after school, take all the joke and riddle books off of the shelves, and sit down and read for hours before going home. They were full of the classic “groaners” that six- to eight-year-old boys love, and I still remember most of them! The jokes that Bear tells are a combination of those memories and the classic “why did the chicken cross the road” variety that still survive today among the same age group. I particularly remember taking out one book dozens of times — Jokes for Children by Marguerite Kohl. It’s a must-read.

5. Who is Bear’s favorite comedian?

LL: Fozzie Bear from The Muppet Show, of course. Wocka, Wocka, Wocka!

—Kitty Flynn


Back to school

What better way to mark the start of the school year than by reading about school? Four new books for elementary-age kids (two picture books and two chapter books) all involve classroom adventures, whether the setting is a one-room schoolhouse, the protagonist is a baked good, or the lessons learned reach beyond report cards.

For young history buffs, here’s a picture-book portrait of a mid-eighteenth-century one-room school. In Hornbooks and Inkwells by Verla Kay, brief staccato quatrains set the scene and tell the story: “Sternly standing, Master greets, / Pairs of children, taking seats.” The school year passes with a sampling of lessons (written on birchbark) and recess (stilts, marbles, ice skating). S. D. Schindler’s lively illustrations evoke the period with such details as dress, the school’s minimal appurtenances, and students helping one another learn. (5–8 years)

Laura Murray transposes a classic folktale to a modern setting in a very funny and fun-to-read-aloud picture book, The Gingerbread Man Loose in the School. When this Gingerbread Man eagerly springs out of the oven, he finds himself in an empty classroom (the children are at recess). The cookie, thinking he’s been abandoned, embarks on a voyage through the school to be reunited with the kids. Mike Lowery’s cartoon-panel mixed-media illustrations imbue the highly sympathetic, wide-eyed confection with an abundance of personality. A pullout classroom poster with games, activities, and a recipe on one side and a full-color image of the protagonist on the other is included. (5–8 years)

In Clementine and the Family Meeting, the latest entry in Sara Pennypacker’s fine series of chapter books, our irrepressible narrator learns that there will be a new baby in the house. Clementine’s reaction is less than enthusiastic. “Our family is four. There are four sides to a puzzle so we can all work on it at once…Four is the perfect number for a family!” Through an unexpected outcome of a science project at school and with her father’s reassurance that it’s OK to be ambivalent about change, Clementine begins to come around. Marla Frazee’s amusing pencil sketches capture Clementine’s inimitable spirit as well as her growing maturity — she’s going to make a great big sister to the baby. (6–9 years)

Third-grader Wilson Williams struggled through his multiplication tables in Claudia Mills’s now-classic chapter book, 7 x 9 = Trouble!; here, well, Fractions = Trouble! Despite his apprehensions, a new tutor manages to make learning fractions painless (combining Wilson’s love of drawing and hamsters), and it turns out that he’s not the only kid in the world who needs help (his best friend Josh has trouble with spelling). Mills seamlessly incorporates helpful math explanations into her highly readable narrative, enhanced by G. Brian Karas’s warmly humorous pencil sketches. (6–9 years)

—Martha V. Parravano

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Size matters in picture books

Caterpillar or tadpole, “little bitty man” or “little little girl,” the diminutive characters of these new picture books have big adventures — proving that what they lack in size, they make up in personality.

The pond gets crowded when Ken Kimura’s 999 Tadpoles transform into 999 frogs, but relocation is hazardous: a hungry hawk nabs Father. Mother’s quick thinking saves the day as she and all the young ones grab on. The wiggling, complaining string of frogs becomes too much for the hawk, which drops them right into a commodious new pond. There’s not a word misplaced in the funny text, and Yasunari Murakami’s illustrations are full of lively movement. (3–6 years)

The teeny protagonist of Kristen Balouch’s The Little Little Girl with the Big Big Voice has such a big, booming voice that she scares off potential playmates (elephant, snake, crocodile). When she comes upon a lion, she meets her match — and makes a friend. Collage-like digital illustrations in a fluorescent palette as loud as the girl’s voice are funky and invigorating. Parents beware: this boisterous book emits an energy unbefitting a bedtime read. (2–5 years)

Gentle rhyme provides a quiet atmosphere for bright cut-paper collages in Bill Martin Jr and Lois Ehlert’s Ten Little Caterpillars, which serves as both counting book and introduction to ten members of the Lepidoptera order. The last caterpillar (a tiger swallow tail) becomes a chrysalis before maturing into a butterfly. Lush illustrations show the caterpillars amid the labeled flora and fauna of their habitats; back matter gives more information about each species included. (2–5 years)

A Little Bitty Man and Other Poems for the Very Young, translated by Marilyn Nelson and Pamela Espeland, features thirteen of the late Danish poet Halfdan Rasmussen’s poems. While the absurd situations and characters (like the titular miniscule man and his wife) of these short selections will elicit laughter, much of the humor comes from Nelson and Espeland’s perfect combinations of words and meaning. Kevin Hawkes’s illustrations get the mix of whimsy, innocence, and childlike dignity just right. (3–6 years)

—Katie Bircher

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Illustrated middle-grade fiction

The continuation of a popular comic novel series, new work from a Caldecott Medal winner, and a novel about the 1950s Soviet Union — three new illustrated novels feature compelling stories not only for proficient middle-grade readers but for reluctant ones, as well. With the art doing as much to advance the plot as the text, these graphic and illustrated novels offer an alternative approach to traditional reading.

Big Nate on a Roll by Lincoln Peirce is the third (mis)adventure of hapless Nate Wright. Here the sixth grader finds himself in fierce, albeit one-sided, competition with Artur, the all-around good guy who always wins everything. Nate is not about to let Artur win a new skateboard (the prize for a scouts fundraising drive), so he cooks up some inventive, mostly self-defeating, schemes to beat him. The interplay between text and drawings remains fresh, and Nate’s own cartoons are almost as funny as Peirce’s. (8–12 years)

WonderstruckCaldecott-winner Brian Selznick (The Invention of Hugo Cabret) again plays with form in his latest book, Wonderstruck. Text and art tell two separate stories that eventually meet: the wordless pictures (pencil, double-page spread) follow a young deaf girl, Rose, living in 1927 Hoboken; the text is set in 1977 Minnesota where Ben struggles with the death of his mother and the loss of his hearing. For different reasons, both children strike out on adventures to New York City and end up at the Museum of Natural History. Ben and Rose are openhearted and easy to love, providing this intricate puzzle of a plot with a generous and welcome shot of emotion. (9–12 years)

In Eugene Yelchin’s Breaking Stalin’s Nose, ten-year-old Sasha Zaichik wants to become a Young Pioneer and show his devotion to Stalin and the Communist party. But when his father, a member of the secret police, is arrested in the middle of the night leaving Sasha all alone, and things go from bad to worse for him the next day at school, Sasha’s illusions about his life begin to unravel. Yelchin’s menacing illustrations add an ominous tone to the briskly paced story that slowly peels off the layers of Sasha’s naiveté to expose the brutality of the system he blindly followed. (9–12 years)

—Cynthia K. Ritter

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YA historical fiction (and one biography)

Nazi Germany, ancient Egypt, and 1893 New York City are the settings for new historical novels for teens, while a biography of Dickens takes readers to Victorian London.

The Berlin Boxing ClubIn 1936 Berlin, Karl Stern is surprised when he’s beaten up by Nazi bullies: he’s blond and fair-skinned, and he and his family aren’t observant Jews. Then German boxing champion Max Schmeling offers him boxing lessons in exchange for one of Karl’s artist father’s paintings. Robert Sharenow’s The Berlin Boxing Club is a meaty, readable account of the perils and pitfalls of daily life in Nazi Germany. (14 years and up)

When thirteen-year-old Piotr is orphaned during the Soviet invasion of Poland, his Aryan features and German ethnicity destine him for a fate different from that of his Polish peers. In The Ausländer, Paul Dowswell’s portrait of Nazi Germany stands out because of its less-familiar elements: the invasion of Poland, the Soviet front, and the scientific theories and experiments of the Nazis. The characters are rich and nuanced; the action is swift and suspenseful; and the juxtaposition of wartime nobility and wartime cruelty is timeless. (12 years and up)

Cleopatra's MoonInvaders take over her world, ignore her gods, are responsible for the deaths of her parents, and haul her off to a world with strange customs, languages, and beliefs, where a “great black-coated beast” threatens to swallow her. The latest dystopian novel for teens? Nope: it’s the story of Cleopatra Selene, daughter of Cleopatra VII, the last queen of Egypt. Vicky Alvear Shecter’s Cleopatra’s Moon is an intelligently written and stately meditation on fate, free will, and political power. (14 years and up)

Thirteen-year-old Maks Geless hawks newspapers for The World in 1893 New York City. A gang has been roughing up the newsies; Maks’s sister Agnes seems to have the “wasting disease”; sister Emma has been arrested for theft; and his father is about to lose his job at a shoe factory. Avi’s prose in City of Orphans is face paced, muscular, and informal. Careful attention to setting, plenty of action, a comfortably complex mystery, and a personable, streetwise omniscient narrator make this a satisfying adventure. (10–14 years)

Charles DickensA biography for middle schoolers, Andrea Warren’s Charles Dickens and the Street Children of London features a narrow but effective focus: how Dickens’s own impoverished childhood led to a deep sense of empathy for the working poor. Warren sticks to her focus for the most part, but the engaging narrative takes some interesting diversions in the middle. (10–14 years)

—Jennifer M. Brabander

From the Editor

As I write, Kitty Flynn and Lolly Robinson, along with our web team in New York, are busy readying a revamped www.hbook.com. Go take a look. There’s some neat new stuff there, including some children’s book satire inspired by Project Runway and an interview by Leonard Marcus with Maurice Sendak about the great artist’s new picture book, Bumble-Ardy.

And don’t miss our new blog, Calling Caldecott. Helmed by Lolly and Horn Book reviewer Robin Smith, the blog will consider all matter of things to do with the Caldecott Medal, including our team’s appraisals of what’s going for this year’s gold. We are hoping that you will be enlightened by the posts and join in the discussion.

Roger Sutton
Editor in Chief

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Notes from the Horn Book, Volume 4, Number 9. © 2011 by The Horn Book, Inc. A Media Source Company.

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This is a test http://www.hbook.com/2015/07/blogs/read-roger/this-is-a-test/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/07/blogs/read-roger/this-is-a-test/#respond Tue, 07 Jul 2015 01:41:40 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=5748 Of the emergency broadcasting system.

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Of the emergency broadcasting system.

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Kids, books, and blogs http://www.hbook.com/2015/07/using-books/kids-books-blogs/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/07/using-books/kids-books-blogs/#respond Tue, 07 Jul 2015 01:39:04 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=6433 Read Roger, Out of the Box, Calling Caldecott — the Horn Book’s blogs. Editor in Chief Roger Sutton rants and raves at “Read Roger,” while at “Out of the Box” the Horn Book staff provides an exclusive look at some of the bizarre but wonderful stuff that comes into the office, including ebooks and apps, paperback originals, […]

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Read RogerOut of the Box, Calling Caldecott — the Horn Book’s blogs. Editor in Chief Roger Sutton rants and raves at “Read Roger,” while at “Out of the Box” the Horn Book staff provides an exclusive look at some of the bizarre but wonderful stuff that comes into the office, including ebooks and apps, paperback originals, audio books, and activity books.

Other recommended children’s book-related blogs include:

American Indians in Children’s Literature — Scholar Debbie Reese is tribally enrolled at Nambe Pueblo in northern New Mexico. Her blog “provides critical perspectives and analysis of indigenous peoples in children’s and young adult books, the school curriculum, popular culture, and society.”

Blue Rose Girls — The collective blog of authors, editors, and enthusiasts, including Grace Lin, Elaine Magliaro, Libby Koponen, Linda S. Wingerter, Anna Alter, Meghan McCarthy, and Alvina Ling.

bookshelves of doom — An irreverent and clever blog touching on kidlit and YA topics. Says the profile, “Highbrow intellectual critiques do not live here.” It’s too modest.

Brooklyn Arden — Blog of Scholastic editor Cheryl Klein, touching on everything from what a typical day for an editor looks like to what shows are currently playing on Broadway.

A Chair, A Fireplace, & A Tea Cozy — Blogger Liz Burns takes on YA topics and controversies over at our sister publication, School Library Journal.

Chicken Spaghetti — Run by a former New Yorker editorial staff member, this blog culls from a wide swath of information to bring the very best info to its readers.

Collecting Children’s Books — Thoughtful book recommendations and children’s literature history from reviewer, collector, and author Peter Sieruta.

Cynsations — Cynthia Leitich Smith presents intensive author features on a variety of established and up-and-coming writers.

educating alice — Says Monica Edinger, “This blog is about teaching, my life’s work; literature, especially that created for children; history, especially as it is taught to and learned by children; Africa, especially Sierra Leone where I was a Peace Corps Volunteer; and other sundry topics as they come to my attention.”

A Fuse #8 Production — NYPL children’s librarian and SLJ blogger Elizabeth Bird updates almost daily with thoughts on upcoming books and kidlitosphere news—including a weekly book-related video feature.

I.N.K. – Interesting Nonfiction for Kids is a group blogging effort that focuses on writing, researching, reading, illustrating, designing, and publishing children’s nonfiction.  

Jen Robinson’s Book Page — Aside from her wonderful round-ups of blog news, Jen Robinson presents reviews of interesting titles.

Mitali’s Fire Escape — Author Mitali Perkins discusses race, ethnicity, and multiculturalism in children’s books, including her own border-crossing novels.

Nonfiction Matters —Historian, author, editor, reader, and SLJ blogger Marc Aronson reflects on the critical role of informational books in the lives of young readers.

100 Scope Notes — Elementary school librarian Travis Jonker’s reviews, original poetry, and book jacket make-overs.

Original Content — Author Gail Gauthier reflects on reading, writing, and goings-on in the kidlitosphere.

Oz and Ends — In addition to his series of posts on The Wizard of Oz, creator J. L. Bell offers his expertise on fantasy literature and the current state of writing for children.

Pink Me — Librarian Pink Me says, “I believe in the word, the picture, the rhyme, the cover of a children’s book, the illustrated endpaper, nonfiction, illustrated poetry. . . I believe in the audio book, teen romance fiction that is not about vampires. . . and I believe in reading for pleasure to, with, and around children.”

Reading Rants — Primarily geared to a teen readership, this long-running blog offers reviews and thematic booklists of YA novels.

Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast — With a saucy wit and unique style, blogger Julie Danielson interviews fellow bloggers, authors, illustrators, and anyone that strikes her fancy.

Six Boxes of Books — Three sisters chronicle their (mostly YA) reading and weigh in on children’s literature controversies.

Under the Green Willow — The official blog of HarperCollins imprint Greenwillow offers lots of story-behind-the-story info from their staff and authors.

Updated July 2011. This list was originally compiled by Elizabeth Bird (A Fuse #8 Production) to accompany her May/June 2007 Horn Book Magazine article, “Blogging the Kidlitosphere.”

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Test ASCII into WordPress http://www.hbook.com/2015/07/choosing-books/test-ascii-wordpress/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/07/choosing-books/test-ascii-wordpress/#respond Tue, 07 Jul 2015 01:31:53 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=8133 What Makes a Good…? What Makes a Good Space Book by Danielle J. Ford The vastness of the universe, explored and unexplored, presents possibilities for all of us to imagine new and different (and perhaps better) worlds, technological feats, and ourselves as active participants in the quest for knowledge beyond our own planet. A good […]

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What Makes a Good…?
What Makes a Good Space Book
by Danielle J. Ford
The vastness of the universe, explored and unexplored, presents possibilities for all of us to imagine new and different (and perhaps better) worlds, technological feats, and ourselves as active participants in the quest for knowledge beyond our own planet.
A good space book captures this melding of anticipation and discovery that lies at the heart of space exploration.
Space books generally touch on one or both of two major themes. First, there are books that feature astronomy — the science-focused books — that explain our knowledge of the planets, stars, and the universe, of comets and nebulae and black holes and all sorts of fascinating, mind-bending deep space phenomena. Then there are those that foreground space exploration — the technology-focused books — that introduce the engineering innovations like telescopes, spacecraft, and rockets that give us better access to what’s beyond our atmosphere. Cutting across and anchoring these two themes are people — the scientists engaged in discovery, the engineers who produce the craft, and the astronauts who get to fly them — and the possibility that young readers, too, could take on any of those roles.
Astronomy is first and foremost a visual field. Humans and machines have only physically been to a few extraterrestrial sites, so focusing on images is integral to the practice of astronomy. A good astronomy book puts visuals front and center. From old-school naked-eye stargazing to the latest in imaging technology, what we see is the data on which the field of astronomy rests. It’s hard to resist the beauty of the orangy-red planet Mars, a close-up of the sharp edge of a ring of Saturn, or the swirling stripes and whorls of the storm-produced clouds of Jupiter. The definitive images in this category belong to Seymour Simon, whose books on planetary bodies (Comets, Meteors, and Asteroids; Our Solar System; Venus; Destination: Space, etc.) set the bar so high that the many lower-quality solar system series books quite literally pale in comparison. Of course, others besides Simon have produced excellent image-centric books. Twenty years of distortion-free images from the Hubble Space Telescope, most recently covered brilliantly in Elaine Scott’s Space, Stars, and the Beginning of Time: What the Hubble Telescope Saw, have given researchers and the public alike access not just to better pictures of the planets but to invitingly mysterious nebulae clouds and distant clusters of star-peppered galaxies. First-rate images can also be found in Sally Ride and Tam O’Shaughnessy’s books (Mystery of Mars, Voyager: An Adventure to the Edge of the Solar System, and Exploring Our Solar System) — and who an beat learning planetary science from a physics PhD who also happens to be one of our most famous former astronauts?
A good astronomy book, however, doesn’t let readers just admire the pretty colors and move on. It also assists us in understanding the technical elements of image production, in a way, changing how we “see.” Some of the pictures in these books are not photographs in the sense we’re used to, but in fact number-crunched, color-enhanced renderings of a wider-than-visible spectrum of electromagnetic waves emitted from astronomical bodies. Others are artists’ conceptions that use scientific knowledge but take some liberties in imagining what such places as the surface of a distant planet or the inside of a future spacecraft might look like. Critical information accompanying the illustrations helps readers clearly delineate among what’s real, enhanced, or imagined.
Of course, we can’t forget that, prior to all sophisticated telescopes and satellite imaging equipment, there were centuries of astronomers just staring up at the sky. Historical accounts such as Peter SÌs’s profile of Galileo in Starry Messenger and Boy, Were We Wrong about the Solar System! by Kathleen V. Kudlinski explain the impressive amount of astronomical knowledge determined before modern times. They also introduce the social and historical contexts of scientific inquiry. Ideas are transformed over time not just with better access to data but with changes in prevailing thought and social conventions. Thinking about what lies beyond the earth, and how it got there, has meant significant conflicts with religious beliefs during periods of Western history in particular. These biographical and historical accounts help us understand the many factors affecting scientific practice.
Children begin with just their eyes, too, and are greatly assisted by Franklyn M. Branley’s classic contributions to the venerable Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science series (the originals are the best, such as The Moon Seems to Change and What Makes Day and Night?) and the still-in-print constellation guides produced by H. A. Rey (The Stars and Find the Constellations). These books are great because they start children where the astronomers started, learning to recognize the objects in the sky and to notice their patterns of movement. Branley’s books are the definitive example of how to explain space concepts in remarkably comprehensible language, and the match of concepts to target age is absolutely perfect. These books may not have the sleek photo images of the books described above, but the charm of Rey’s star charts, or the friendliness of the Let’s-Read illustrations, certainly do the trick. There are a few recent revisions to the Let’s-Read books, also found in lesser astronomy books, that take the whimsy a bit too far. Overly stylistic, mid-century retro cartoons that violate the scientific principles they’re illustrating are a no-no, and there should never, ever be an alien in a good astronomy book — unless we reach the time when scientists have found some.
Though astronomy books are dominated by, well, astronomy, there are other scientific fields engaged in planetary exploration that when included enhance the quality of space books. Indeed, increasingly more important as we develop newer technologies and focus research efforts beyond just documentation and imaging is the cross-disciplinary potential of fields like planetary geology and exobiology. We have sensors that can remotely assess chemical compositions of rocks on the surface of a planet; we have actual samples from Mars and the moon; and researchers are actively exploring ways in which life might exist outside of the conditions we find normal. Exobiology, in particular, taps into that thrilling thought that there might be life other than us in the universe, and the science is cutting edge and complicated. Two notable profiles of scientists in search of life in outer space include Ellen Jackson’s Looking for Life in the Universe: The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, which features Jill Tarter, director of the SETI (Search for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence) Institute, and Vicki Oransky Wittenstein’s Planet Hunter: Geoff Marcy and the Search for Other Earths. If there are aliens worthy of illustration in a children’s book, Marcy, Tarter, and their colleagues will be the ones to find them.
Or perhaps someday a space explorer will meet them. The fascination we have with actually going to outer space, and the massive technological (and financial) efforts exerted to put humans into space, make for some of the most compelling space books available. The recent fortieth anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission — the one where humans walked on the surface of the Moon for the very first time — was the impetus for some truly outstanding space books that capture the wide-open possibilities and space fervor of the 1960s. Andrew Chaikin’s Mission Control, This Is Apollo: The Story of the First Voyages to the Moon surveys all of the Apollo missions, personalized by the inclusion of astronaut Alan Bean’s impressionistic paintings and commentary, and effectively conveys the full scope of the Apollo program as it progressed from rocket building to flight testing to actual scientific missions. Moonshot: The Flight of Apollo 11 by Brian Floca is a masterful yet intimate telling of the Apollo 11 story, reflecting what it must have been like to be there for the mission, be it as an astronaut in the spacecraft or a spectator watching on TV. Readers can also get the astronaut perspective from Buzz Aldrin himself in Look to the Stars, and can very convincingly place themselves in a virtual mission by reading the second-person narration of Faith McNulty and Stephen Kellogg’s If You Decide to Go to the Moon, winner of the 2006 Boston Globe-Horn Book Award for Nonfiction.
Not all children have had equal opportunities to see themselves as space explorers, however, as the barriers faced by women and people of color attempting to enter the space program (at least in the United States) were not overcome until the late 1970s. Tanya Lee Stone’s noteworthy Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream presents an unvarnished history of the “Mercury 13″ — the accomplished women who tried but failed to get into the American space program in the early 1960s — and the times in which they lived. A good space book like this one compels readers to discuss its implications, perhaps with their elders who lived through this era, to reflect on what still hasn’t changed about our expectations for women in space, and to appreciate what has.
What era are we living in today? Although we’ve had two more prominent space programs — the space shuttle and the International Space Station — there doesn’t seem to be similar enthusiasm in the book world to produce compelling stories about the last few decades of American efforts in piloted space missions. Do peacetime international cooperative agreements and an increased commercial outsourcing lack the frisson of the Cold War quest for space domination? With now hundreds of astronauts walking the Earth, do none stand out in our collective mind? Sure, there are plenty of lower quality books diagramming rocket parts or providing hero bios of various astronauts, but few are noteworthy. Two notable books about more recent space technologies (Floating in Space and The International Space Station) come, not surprisingly, from Franklyn M. Branley and the Let’s-Read series again, this time illustrated by True Kelley, but, published in 1998 and 2000, respectively, they’re starting to show their age.
Perhaps it is because the coolest missions going on right now are the human-free, computer-controlled ones. A series of trips to Mars in the past decade, fronted by the appealing Wall-E-like rovers, have been featured in superior books such as the latest in this category, Cars on Mars: Roving the Red Planet by Alexandra Siy. Hopefully the upcoming NASA missions, even sans humans, will spark additional interest. Or perhaps it will be the scientists, not astronauts, who serve to inspire and motivate the next generation ofspace dreamers.
Danielle J. Ford is a Horn Book reviewer and an associate professor in the school of education at the University of Delaware.

SIDEBAR:
Good Space Books
Look to the Stars (Putnam, 2009) by Buzz Aldrin; illus. by Wendell Minor
Floating in Space [Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science] (HarperCollins, 1998) by Franklyn M. Branley; illus. by True Kelley
The International Space Station [Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science] (HarperCollins, 2000) by Franklyn M. Branley; illus. by True Kelley
The Moon Seems to Change [Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science] (Crowell, 1960) by Franklyn M. Branley; illus. by Helen Borten (reissued by HarperCollins in 1987 with illus. by Barbara and Ed Emberley)
What Makes Day and Night? [Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science] (Crowell, 1961) by Franklyn M. Branley; illus. by Helen Borten (reissued by HarperCollins in 1986 with illus. by Arthur Dorros)
Mission Control, This Is Apollo: The Story of the First Voyages to the Moon (Viking, 2009) by Andrew Chaikin; illus. by Alan Bean
Moonshot: The Flight of Apollo 11 (Jackson/Atheneum, 2009) by Brian Floca
Looking for Life in the Universe: The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence [Scientists in the Field] (Houghton, 2002) by Ellen Jackson; photos by Nic Bishop
Boy, Were We Wrong about the Solar System! (Dutton, 2008) by Kathleen V. Kudlinski; illus. by John Rocco
If You Decide to Go to the Moon (Scholastic, 2005) by Faith McNulty; illus. by Steven Kellogg
Find the Constellations (Houghton, 1954) by H. A. Rey
The Stars (Houghton, 1952) by H. A. Rey
Exploring our Solar System (Crown, 2003) by Sally Ride and Tam O’Shaughnessy
Mystery of Mars (Crown, 1999) by Sally Ride and Tam O’Shaughnessy
Voyager: An Adventure to the Edge of the Solar System [Face to Face with Science] (Crown, 1992) by Sally Ride and Tam O’Shaughnessy
Space, Stars, and the Beginning of Time: What the Hubble Telescope Saw (Clarion, 2011) by Elaine Scott
Comets, Meteors, and Asteroids (Morrow, 1994) by Seymour Simon
Destination: Space (HarperCollins, 2002) by Seymour Simon
Our Solar System (Morrow, 1992) by Seymour Simon (revised edition from HarperCollins, 2007)
Venus (Morrow, 1992) by Seymour Simon
Starry Messenger: A Book Depicting the Life of a Famous Scientist, Mathematician, Astronomer, Philosopher, Physicist, Galileo Galilei (Foster/Farrar, 1996) by Peter SÌs
Cars on Mars: Roving the Red Planet (Charlesbridge, 2009) by Alexandra Siy
Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream (Candlewick, 2009) by Tanya Lee Stone
Planet Hunter: Geoff Marcy and the Search for Other Earths (Boyds Mills, 2010) by Vicki Oransky Wittenstein

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Test ASCII to Word to WordPress http://www.hbook.com/2015/07/choosing-books/test-ascii-word-wordpress/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/07/choosing-books/test-ascii-word-wordpress/#respond Tue, 07 Jul 2015 01:31:47 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=8135 What Makes a Good…?   What Makes a Good Space Book   by Danielle J. Ford   The vastness of the universe, explored and unexplored, presents possibilities for all of us to imagine new and different (and perhaps better) worlds, technological feats, and ourselves as active participants in the quest for knowledge beyond our own […]

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What Makes a Good…?

 

What Makes a Good Space Book

 

by Danielle J. Ford

 

The vastness of the universe, explored and unexplored, presents possibilities for all of us to imagine new and different (and perhaps better) worlds, technological feats, and ourselves as active participants in the quest for knowledge beyond our own planet.

 

A good space book captures this melding of anticipation and discovery that lies at the heart of space exploration.

 

Space books generally touch on one or both of two major themes. First, there are books that feature astronomy — the science-focused books — that explain our knowledge of the planets, stars, and the universe, of comets and nebulae and black holes and all sorts of fascinating, mind-bending deep space phenomena. Then there are those that foreground space exploration — the technology-focused books — that introduce the engineering innovations like telescopes, spacecraft, and rockets that give us better access to what’s beyond our atmosphere. Cutting across and anchoring these two themes are people — the scientists engaged in discovery, the engineers who produce the craft, and the astronauts who get to fly them — and the possibility that young readers, too, could take on any of those roles.

 

Astronomy is first and foremost a visual field. Humans and machines have only physically been to a few extraterrestrial sites, so focusing on images is integral to the practice of astronomy. A good astronomy book puts visuals front and center. From old-school naked-eye stargazing to the latest in imaging technology, what we see is the data on which the field of astronomy rests. It’s hard to resist the beauty of the orangy-red planet Mars, a close-up of the sharp edge of a ring of Saturn, or the swirling stripes and whorls of the storm-produced clouds of Jupiter. The definitive images in this category belong to Seymour Simon, whose books on planetary bodies (Comets, Meteors, and Asteroids; Our Solar System; Venus; Destination: Space, etc.) set the bar so high that the many lower-quality solar system series books quite literally pale in comparison. Of course, others besides Simon have produced excellent image-centric books. Twenty years of distortion-free images from the Hubble Space Telescope, most recently covered brilliantly in Elaine Scott’s Space, Stars, and the Beginning of Time: What the Hubble Telescope Saw, have given researchers and the public alike access not just to better pictures of the planets but to invitingly mysterious nebulae clouds and distant clusters of star-peppered galaxies. First-rate images can also be found in Sally Ride and Tam O’Shaughnessy’s books (Mystery of Mars, Voyager: An Adventure to the Edge of the Solar System, and Exploring Our Solar System) — and who an beat learning planetary science from a physics PhD who also happens to be one of our most famous former astronauts?

 

A good astronomy book, however, doesn’t let readers just admire the pretty colors and move on. It also assists us in understanding the technical elements of image production, in a way, changing how we “see.” Some of the pictures in these books are not photographs in the sense we’re used to, but in fact number-crunched, color-enhanced renderings of a wider-than-visible spectrum of electromagnetic waves emitted from astronomical bodies. Others are artists’ conceptions that use scientific knowledge but take some liberties in imagining what such places as the surface of a distant planet or the inside of a future spacecraft might look like. Critical information accompanying the illustrations helps readers clearly delineate among what’s real, enhanced, or imagined.

 

Of course, we can’t forget that, prior to all sophisticated telescopes and satellite imaging equipment, there were centuries of astronomers just staring up at the sky. Historical accounts such as Peter SÌs’s profile of Galileo in Starry Messenger and Boy, Were We Wrong about the Solar System! by Kathleen V. Kudlinski explain the impressive amount of astronomical knowledge determined before modern times. They also introduce the social and historical contexts of scientific inquiry. Ideas are transformed over time not just with better access to data but with changes in prevailing thought and social conventions. Thinking about what lies beyond the earth, and how it got there, has meant significant conflicts with religious beliefs during periods of Western history in particular. These biographical and historical accounts help us understand the many factors affecting scientific practice.

 

Children begin with just their eyes, too, and are greatly assisted by Franklyn M. Branley’s classic contributions to the venerable Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science series (the originals are the best, such as The Moon Seems to Change and What Makes Day and Night?) and the still-in-print constellation guides produced by H. A. Rey (The Stars and Find the Constellations). These books are great because they start children where the astronomers started, learning to recognize the objects in the sky and to notice their patterns of movement. Branley’s books are the definitive example of how to explain space concepts in remarkably comprehensible language, and the match of concepts to target age is absolutely perfect. These books may not have the sleek photo images of the books described above, but the charm of Rey’s star charts, or the friendliness of the Let’s-Read illustrations, certainly do the trick. There are a few recent revisions to the Let’s-Read books, also found in lesser astronomy books, that take the whimsy a bit too far. Overly stylistic, mid-century retro cartoons that violate the scientific principles they’re illustrating are a no-no, and there should never, ever be an alien in a good astronomy book — unless we reach the time when scientists have found some.

 

Though astronomy books are dominated by, well, astronomy, there are other scientific fields engaged in planetary exploration that when included enhance the quality of space books. Indeed, increasingly more important as we develop newer technologies and focus research efforts beyond just documentation and imaging is the cross-disciplinary potential of fields like planetary geology and exobiology. We have sensors that can remotely assess chemical compositions of rocks on the surface of a planet; we have actual samples from Mars and the moon; and researchers are actively exploring ways in which life might exist outside of the conditions we find normal. Exobiology, in particular, taps into that thrilling thought that there might be life other than us in the universe, and the science is cutting edge and complicated. Two notable profiles of scientists in search of life in outer space include Ellen Jackson’s Looking for Life in the Universe: The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, which features Jill Tarter, director of the SETI (Search for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence) Institute, and Vicki Oransky Wittenstein’s Planet Hunter: Geoff Marcy and the Search for Other Earths. If there are aliens worthy of illustration in a children’s book, Marcy, Tarter, and their colleagues will be the ones to find them.

 

Or perhaps someday a space explorer will meet them. The fascination we have with actually going to outer space, and the massive technological (and financial) efforts exerted to put humans into space, make for some of the most compelling space books available. The recent fortieth anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission — the one where humans walked on the surface of the Moon for the very first time — was the impetus for some truly outstanding space books that capture the wide-open possibilities and space fervor of the 1960s. Andrew Chaikin’s Mission Control, This Is Apollo: The Story of the First Voyages to the Moon surveys all of the Apollo missions, personalized by the inclusion of astronaut Alan Bean’s impressionistic paintings and commentary, and effectively conveys the full scope of the Apollo program as it progressed from rocket building to flight testing to actual scientific missions. Moonshot: The Flight of Apollo 11 by Brian Floca is a masterful yet intimate telling of the Apollo 11 story, reflecting what it must have been like to be there for the mission, be it as an astronaut in the spacecraft or a spectator watching on TV. Readers can also get the astronaut perspective from Buzz Aldrin himself in Look to the Stars, and can very convincingly place themselves in a virtual mission by reading the second-person narration of Faith McNulty and Stephen Kellogg’s If You Decide to Go to the Moon, winner of the 2006 Boston Globe-Horn Book Award for Nonfiction.

 

Not all children have had equal opportunities to see themselves as space explorers, however, as the barriers faced by women and people of color attempting to enter the space program (at least in the United States) were not overcome until the late 1970s. Tanya Lee Stone’s noteworthy Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream presents an unvarnished history of the “Mercury 13″ — the accomplished women who tried but failed to get into the American space program in the early 1960s — and the times in which they lived. A good space book like this one compels readers to discuss its implications, perhaps with their elders who lived through this era, to reflect on what still hasn’t changed about our expectations for women in space, and to appreciate what has.

 

What era are we living in today? Although we’ve had two more prominent space programs — the space shuttle and the International Space Station — there doesn’t seem to be similar enthusiasm in the book world to produce compelling stories about the last few decades of American efforts in piloted space missions. Do peacetime international cooperative agreements and an increased commercial outsourcing lack the frisson of the Cold War quest for space domination? With now hundreds of astronauts walking the Earth, do none stand out in our collective mind? Sure, there are plenty of lower quality books diagramming rocket parts or providing hero bios of various astronauts, but few are noteworthy. Two notable books about more recent space technologies (Floating in Space and The International Space Station) come, not surprisingly, from Franklyn M. Branley and the Let’s-Read series again, this time illustrated by True Kelley, but, published in 1998 and 2000, respectively, they’re starting to show their age.

 

Perhaps it is because the coolest missions going on right now are the human-free, computer-controlled ones. A series of trips to Mars in the past decade, fronted by the appealing Wall-E-like rovers, have been featured in superior books such as the latest in this category, Cars on Mars: Roving the Red Planet by Alexandra Siy. Hopefully the upcoming NASA missions, even sans humans, will spark additional interest. Or perhaps it will be the scientists, not astronauts, who serve to inspire and motivate the next generation ofspace dreamers.

 

Danielle J. Ford is a Horn Book reviewer and an associate professor in the school of education at the University of Delaware.

 

 

 

SIDEBAR:

 

Good Space Books

 

Look to the Stars (Putnam, 2009) by Buzz Aldrin; illus. by Wendell Minor

 

Floating in Space [Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science] (HarperCollins, 1998) by Franklyn M. Branley; illus. by True Kelley

 

The International Space Station [Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science] (HarperCollins, 2000) by Franklyn M. Branley; illus. by True Kelley

 

The Moon Seems to Change [Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science] (Crowell, 1960) by Franklyn M. Branley; illus. by Helen Borten (reissued by HarperCollins in 1987 with illus. by Barbara and Ed Emberley)

 

What Makes Day and Night? [Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science] (Crowell, 1961) by Franklyn M. Branley; illus. by Helen Borten (reissued by HarperCollins in 1986 with illus. by Arthur Dorros)

 

Mission Control, This Is Apollo: The Story of the First Voyages to the Moon (Viking, 2009) by Andrew Chaikin; illus. by Alan Bean

 

Moonshot: The Flight of Apollo 11 (Jackson/Atheneum, 2009) by Brian Floca

 

Looking for Life in the Universe: The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence [Scientists in the Field] (Houghton, 2002) by Ellen Jackson; photos by Nic Bishop

 

Boy, Were We Wrong about the Solar System! (Dutton, 2008) by Kathleen V. Kudlinski; illus. by John Rocco

 

If You Decide to Go to the Moon (Scholastic, 2005) by Faith McNulty; illus. by Steven Kellogg

 

Find the Constellations (Houghton, 1954) by H. A. Rey

 

The Stars (Houghton, 1952) by H. A. Rey

 

Exploring our Solar System (Crown, 2003) by Sally Ride and Tam O’Shaughnessy

 

Mystery of Mars (Crown, 1999) by Sally Ride and Tam O’Shaughnessy

 

Voyager: An Adventure to the Edge of the Solar System [Face to Face with Science] (Crown, 1992) by Sally Ride and Tam O’Shaughnessy

 

Space, Stars, and the Beginning of Time: What the Hubble Telescope Saw (Clarion, 2011) by Elaine Scott

 

Comets, Meteors, and Asteroids (Morrow, 1994) by Seymour Simon

 

Destination: Space (HarperCollins, 2002) by Seymour Simon

 

Our Solar System (Morrow, 1992) by Seymour Simon (revised edition from HarperCollins, 2007)

 

Venus (Morrow, 1992) by Seymour Simon

 

Starry Messenger: A Book Depicting the Life of a Famous Scientist, Mathematician, Astronomer, Philosopher, Physicist, Galileo Galilei (Foster/Farrar, 1996) by Peter SÌs

 

Cars on Mars: Roving the Red Planet (Charlesbridge, 2009) by Alexandra Siy

 

Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream (Candlewick, 2009) by Tanya Lee Stone

 

Planet Hunter: Geoff Marcy and the Search for Other Earths (Boyds Mills, 2010) by Vicki Oransky Wittenstein

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What Makes a Good…?
What Makes a Good Space Book?
by Danielle J. Ford
The vastness of the universe, explored and unexplored, presents
possibilities for all of us to imagine new and different (and
perhaps better) worlds, technological feats, and ourselves as active participants in the quest for knowledge beyond our own planet.
A good space book captures this melding of anticipation and discovery that lies at the heart of space exploration.
Space books generally touch on one or both of two major themes. First, there are books that feature astronomy—the science-focused books—that explain our knowledge of the planets, stars, and the universe, of comets and nebulae and black holes and all sorts of fascinating, mind-bending deep space phenomena. Then there are those that foreground space exploration—the technology-focused books—that introduce the engineering innovations like telescopes, spacecraft, and rockets that give us better access to what’s beyond our atmosphere. Cutting across and anchoring these two themes are people—the scientists engaged in discovery, the engineers who produce the craft, and the astronauts who get to fly them—and the possibility that young readers, too, could take on any of those roles.
Astronomy is first and foremost a visual field. Humans and machines have only physically been to a few extraterrestrial sites, so focusing on images is integral to the practice of astronomy. A good astronomy book puts visuals front and center. From old-school naked-eye stargazing to the latest in imaging technology, what we see is the data on which the field of astronomy rests. It’s hard to resist the beauty of the orangy-red planet Mars, a close-up of the sharp edge of a ring of Saturn, or the swirling stripes and whorls of the storm-produced clouds of Jupiter. The definitive images in this category belong to Seymour Simon, whose books on planetary bodies (Comets, Meteors, and Asteroids; Our Solar System; Venus; Destination: Space, etc.) set the bar so high that the many lower-quality solar system series books quite literally pale in comparison. Of course, others besides Simon have produced excellent image-centric books. Twenty years of distortion-free images from the Hubble Space Telescope, most recently covered brilliantly in Elaine Scott’s Space, Stars, and the Beginning of Time: What the Hubble Telescope Saw, have given researchers and the public alike access not just to better pictures of the planets but to invitingly mysterious nebulae clouds and distant clusters of star-peppered galaxies. First-rate images can also be found in Sally Ride and Tam O’Shaughnessy’s books (Mystery of Mars, Voyager: An Adventure to the Edge of the Solar System, and Exploring Our Solar System)—and who can beat learning planetary science from a physics PhD who also happens to be one of our most famous former astronauts?
A good astronomy book, however, doesn’t let readers just admire the pretty colors and move on. It also assists us in understanding the technical elements of image production, in a way, changing how we “see.” Some of the pictures in these books are not photographs in the sense we’re used to, but in fact number-crunched, color-enhanced renderings of a wider-than-visible spectrum of electromagnetic waves emitted from astronomical bodies. Others are artists’ conceptions that use scientific knowledge but take some liberties in imagining what such places as the surface of a distant planet or the inside of a future spacecraft might look like. Critical information accompanying the illustrations helps readers clearly delineate among what’s real, enhanced, or imagined.
Of course, we can’t forget that, prior to all sophisticated telescopes and satellite imaging equipment, there were centuries of astronomers just staring up at the sky. Historical accounts such as Peter Sís’s profile of Galileo in Starry Messenger and Boy, Were We Wrong about the Solar System! by Kathleen V. Kudlinski explain the impressive amount of astronomical knowledge determined before modern times.
They also introduce the social and historical contexts of scientific inquiry. Ideas are transformed over time not just with better access to data but with changes in prevailing thought and social conventions. Thinking about what lies beyond the earth, and how it got there, has meant significant conflicts with religious beliefs during periods of Western history in particular. These biographical and historical accounts help us understand the many factors affecting scientific practice.
Children begin with just their eyes, too, and are greatly assisted by Franklyn M. Branley’s classic contributions to the venerable Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science series (the originals are the best, such as The Moon Seems to Change and What Makes Day and Night?) and the still-in-print constellation guides produced by H. A. Rey (The Stars and Find the Constellations). These books are great because they start children where the astronomers started, learning to recognize the objects in the sky and to notice their patterns of movement. Branley’s books are the definitive example of how to explain space concepts in remarkably comprehensible language, and the match of concepts to target age is absolutely perfect. These books may not have the sleek photo images of the books described above, but the charm of Rey’s star charts, or the friendliness of the Let’s-Read illustrations, certainly do the trick. There are a few recent revisions to the Let’s-Read books, also found in lesser astronomy books, that take the whimsy a bit too far. Overly stylistic, mid-century retro cartoons that violate the scientific principles they’re illustrating are a no-no, and there should never, ever be an alien in
a good astronomy book—unless we reach the time when scientists have found some.
Though astronomy books are dominated by, well, astronomy, there are other scientific fields engaged in planetary exploration that when included enhance the quality of space books. Indeed, increasingly more important as we develop newer technologies and focus research efforts beyond just documentation and imaging is the cross-disciplinary potential of fields like planetary geology and exobiology. We have sensors that can remotely assess chemical compositions of rocks on the surface of a planet; we have actual samples from Mars and the moon; and researchers are actively exploring ways in which life might exist outside of the conditions we find normal. Exobiology, in particular, taps into that thrilling thought that there might be life other than us in the universe, and the science is cutting edge and complicated. Two notable profiles of scientists in search of life in outer space include Ellen Jackson’s Looking for Life in the Universe: The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, which features Jill Tarter, director of the SETI (Search for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence) Institute, and Vicki Oransky Wittenstein’s Planet Hunter: Geoff Marcy and the Search for Other Earths. If there are aliens worthy of illustration in a children’s book, Marcy, Tarter, and their colleagues will be the ones to find them.
Or perhaps someday a space explorer will meet them. The fascination we have with actually going to outer space, and the massive technological (and financial) efforts exerted to put humans into space, make for some of the most compelling space books available. The recent fortieth anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission—the one where humans walked on the surface of the Moon for the very first time—was the impetus for some truly outstanding space books that capture the wide-open possibilities and space fervor of the 1960s. Andrew Chaikin’s Mission Control, This Is Apollo: The Story of the First Voyages to the Moon surveys all of the Apollo missions, personalized by the inclusion of astronaut Alan Bean’s impressionistic paintings and commentary, and effectively conveys the full scope of the Apollo program as it progressed from rocket building to flight testing to actual scientific missions. Moonshot: The Flight of Apollo 11 by Brian Floca is a masterful yet intimate telling of the Apollo 11 story, reflecting what it must have been like to be there for the mission, be it as an astronaut in the spacecraft or a spectator watching on TV. Readers can also get the astronaut perspective from Buzz Aldrin himself in Look to the Stars, and can very convincingly place themselves in a virtual mission by reading the second-person narration of Faith McNulty and Stephen Kellogg’s If You Decide to Go to the Moon, winner of the 2006 Boston Globe–Horn Book Award for Nonfiction.
Not all children have had equal opportunities to see themselves as space explorers, however, as the barriers faced by women and people of color attempting to enter the space program (at least in the United States) were not overcome until the late 1970s. Tanya Lee Stone’s noteworthy Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream presents an unvarnished history of the “Mercury 13”—the accomplished women who tried but failed to get into the American space program in the early 1960s—and the times in which they lived. A good space book like this one compels readers to discuss its implications, perhaps with their elders who lived through this era, to reflect on what still hasn’t changed about our expectations for women in space, and to appreciate
what has.
What era are we living in today? Although we’ve had two more prominent space programs—the space shuttle and the International Space Station—there doesn’t seem to be similar enthusiasm in the book world to produce compelling stories about the last few decades of American efforts in piloted space missions. Do peacetime international cooperative agreements and an increased commercial outsourcing lack the frisson of the Cold War quest for space domination? With now hundreds of astronauts walking the Earth, do none stand out in our collective mind? Sure, there are plenty of lower quality books diagramming rocket parts or providing hero bios of various astronauts, but few are noteworthy. Two notable books about more recent space technologies (Floating in Space and The International Space Station) come, not surprisingly, from Franklyn M. Branley and the Let’s-Read series again, this time illustrated by True Kelley, but, published in 1998 and 2000, respectively, they’re starting to show their age.
Perhaps it is because the coolest missions going on right now are the human-free, computer-controlled ones. A series of trips to Mars in the past decade, fronted by the appealing
Wall-E-like rovers, have been featured in superior books such as the latest in this category, Cars on Mars: Roving the Red Planet by Alexandra Siy. Hopefully the upcoming NASA missions, even sans humans, will spark additional interest. Or perhaps it will be the scientists, not astronauts, who serve to inspire and motivate the next generation of space dreamers. n

Danielle J. Ford is a Horn Book reviewer and an associate professor in the school of education at the University of Delaware.

Good Space Books
Look to the Stars (Putnam, 2009) by Buzz Aldrin; illus. by Wendell Minor
Floating in Space [Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science] (HarperCollins, 1998) by Franklyn M. Branley; illus. by True Kelley
The International Space Station [Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science] (HarperCollins, 2000) by Franklyn M. Branley; illus. by True Kelley
The Moon Seems to Change [Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science] (Crowell, 1960) by Franklyn M. Branley; illus. by Helen Borten (reissued by HarperCollins in 1987 with illus. by Barbara and Ed Emberley)
What Makes Day and Night? [Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science] (Crowell, 1961) by Franklyn M. Branley; illus. by Helen Borten (reissued by HarperCollins in 1986 with illus. by Arthur Dorros)
Mission Control, This Is Apollo: The Story of the First Voyages to the Moon (Viking, 2009) by Andrew Chaikin; illus. by Alan Bean
Moonshot: The Flight of Apollo 11 (Jackson/Atheneum, 2009) by Brian Floca
Looking for Life in the Universe: The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence [Scientists in the Field] (Houghton, 2002) by Ellen Jackson; photos by Nic Bishop
Boy, Were We Wrong about the Solar System! (Dutton, 2008) by Kathleen V. Kudlinski; illus. by John Rocco
If You Decide to Go to the Moon (Scholastic, 2005) by Faith McNulty; illus. by Steven Kellogg
Find the Constellations (Houghton, 1954) by H. A. Rey
The Stars (Houghton, 1952) by H. A. Rey
Exploring our Solar System (Crown, 2003) by Sally Ride and Tam O’Shaughnessy
Mystery of Mars (Crown, 1999) by Sally Ride and Tam O’Shaughnessy
Voyager: An Adventure to the Edge of the Solar System [Face to Face with Science] (Crown, 1992) by Sally Ride and Tam O’Shaughnessy
Space, Stars, and the Beginning of Time: What the Hubble Telescope Saw (Clarion, 2011) by Elaine Scott
Comets, Meteors, and Asteroids (Morrow, 1994) by Seymour Simon
Destination: Space (HarperCollins, 2002) by Seymour Simon
Our Solar System (Morrow, 1992) by Seymour Simon (revised edition from HarperCollins, 2007)
Venus (Morrow, 1992) by Seymour Simon
Starry Messenger: A Book Depicting the Life of a Famous Scientist, Mathematician, Astronomer, Philosopher, Physicist, Galileo Galilei (Foster/Farrar, 1996) by Peter Sís
Cars on Mars: Roving the Red Planet (Charlesbridge, 2009) by Alexandra Siy
Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream (Candlewick, 2009) by Tanya Lee Stone
Planet Hunter: Geoff Marcy and the Search for Other Earths (Boyds Mills, 2010) by Vicki Oransky Wittenstein

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What Makes a Good…?

What Makes a Good Space Book?

by Danielle J. Ford

The vastness of the universe, explored and unexplored, presents
possibilities for all of us to imagine new and different (and
perhaps better) worlds, technological feats, and ourselves as active participants in the quest for knowledge beyond our own planet.

A good space book captures this melding of anticipation and discovery that lies at the heart of space exploration.

Space books generally touch on one or both of two major themes. First, there are books that feature astronomy—the science-focused books—that explain our knowledge of the planets, stars, and the universe, of comets and nebulae and black holes and all sorts of fascinating, mind-bending deep space phenomena. Then there are those that foreground space exploration—the technology-focused books—that introduce the engineering innovations like telescopes, spacecraft, and rockets that give us better access to what’s beyond our atmosphere. Cutting across and anchoring these two themes are people—the scientists engaged in discovery, the engineers who produce the craft, and the astronauts who get to fly them—and the possibility that young readers, too, could take on any of those roles.

Astronomy is first and foremost a visual field. Humans and machines have only physically been to a few extraterrestrial sites, so focusing on images is integral to the practice of astronomy. A good astronomy book puts visuals front and center. From old-school naked-eye stargazing to the latest in imaging technology, what we see is the data on which the field of astronomy rests. It’s hard to resist the beauty of the orangy-red planet Mars, a close-up of the sharp edge of a ring of Saturn, or the swirling stripes and whorls of the storm-produced clouds of Jupiter. The definitive images in this category belong to Seymour Simon, whose books on planetary bodies (Comets, Meteors, and Asteroids; Our Solar System; Venus; Destination: Space, etc.) set the bar so high that the many lower-quality solar system series books quite literally pale in comparison. Of course, others besides Simon have produced excellent image-centric books. Twenty years of distortion-free images from the Hubble Space Telescope, most recently covered brilliantly in Elaine Scott’s Space, Stars, and the Beginning of Time: What the Hubble Telescope Saw, have given researchers and the public alike access not just to better pictures of the planets but to invitingly mysterious nebulae clouds and distant clusters of star-peppered galaxies. First-rate images can also be found in Sally Ride and Tam O’Shaughnessy’s books (Mystery of Mars, Voyager: An Adventure to the Edge of the Solar System, and Exploring Our Solar System)—and who can beat learning planetary science from a physics PhD who also happens to be one of our most famous former astronauts?

A good astronomy book, however, doesn’t let readers just admire the pretty colors and move on. It also assists us in understanding the technical elements of image production, in a way, changing how we “see.” Some of the pictures in these books are not photographs in the sense we’re used to, but in fact number-crunched, color-enhanced renderings of a wider-than-visible spectrum of electromagnetic waves emitted from astronomical bodies. Others are artists’ conceptions that use scientific knowledge but take some liberties in imagining what such places as the surface of a distant planet or the inside of a future spacecraft might look like. Critical information accompanying the illustrations helps readers clearly delineate among what’s real, enhanced, or imagined.

Of course, we can’t forget that, prior to all sophisticated telescopes and satellite imaging equipment, there were centuries of astronomers just staring up at the sky. Historical accounts such as Peter Sís’s profile of Galileo in Starry Messenger and Boy, Were We Wrong about the Solar System! by Kathleen V. Kudlinski explain the impressive amount of astronomical knowledge determined before modern times.
They also introduce the social and historical contexts of scientific inquiry. Ideas are transformed over time not just with better access to data but with changes in prevailing thought and social conventions. Thinking about what lies beyond the earth, and how it got there, has meant significant conflicts with religious beliefs during periods of Western history in particular. These biographical and historical accounts help us understand the many factors affecting scientific practice.

Children begin with just their eyes, too, and are greatly assisted by Franklyn M. Branley’s classic contributions to the venerable Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science series (the originals are the best, such as The Moon Seems to Change and What Makes Day and Night?) and the still-in-print constellation guides produced by H. A. Rey (The Stars and Find the Constellations). These books are great because they start children where the astronomers started, learning to recognize the objects in the sky and to notice their patterns of movement. Branley’s books are the definitive example of how to explain space concepts in remarkably comprehensible language, and the match of concepts to target age is absolutely perfect. These books may not have the sleek photo images of the books described above, but the charm of Rey’s star charts, or the friendliness of the Let’s-Read illustrations, certainly do the trick. There are a few recent revisions to the Let’s-Read books, also found in lesser astronomy books, that take the whimsy a bit too far. Overly stylistic, mid-century retro cartoons that violate the scientific principles they’re illustrating are a no-no, and there should never, ever be an alien in
a good astronomy book—unless we reach the time when scientists have found some.

Though astronomy books are dominated by, well, astronomy, there are other scientific fields engaged in planetary exploration that when included enhance the quality of space books. Indeed, increasingly more important as we develop newer technologies and focus research efforts beyond just documentation and imaging is the cross-disciplinary potential of fields like planetary geology and exobiology. We have sensors that can remotely assess chemical compositions of rocks on the surface of a planet; we have actual samples from Mars and the moon; and researchers are actively exploring ways in which life might exist outside of the conditions we find normal. Exobiology, in particular, taps into that thrilling thought that there might be life other than us in the universe, and the science is cutting edge and complicated. Two notable profiles of scientists in search of life in outer space include Ellen Jackson’s Looking for Life in the Universe: The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, which features Jill Tarter, director of the SETI (Search for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence) Institute, and Vicki Oransky Wittenstein’s Planet Hunter: Geoff Marcy and the Search for Other Earths. If there are aliens worthy of illustration in a children’s book, Marcy, Tarter, and their colleagues will be the ones to find them.

Or perhaps someday a space explorer will meet them. The fascination we have with actually going to outer space, and the massive technological (and financial) efforts exerted to put humans into space, make for some of the most compelling space books available. The recent fortieth anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission—the one where humans walked on the surface of the Moon for the very first time—was the impetus for some truly outstanding space books that capture the wide-open possibilities and space fervor of the 1960s. Andrew Chaikin’s Mission Control, This Is Apollo: The Story of the First Voyages to the Moon surveys all of the Apollo missions, personalized by the inclusion of astronaut Alan Bean’s impressionistic paintings and commentary, and effectively conveys the full scope of the Apollo program as it progressed from rocket building to flight testing to actual scientific missions. Moonshot: The Flight of Apollo 11 by Brian Floca is a masterful yet intimate telling of the Apollo 11 story, reflecting what it must have been like to be there for the mission, be it as an astronaut in the spacecraft or a spectator watching on TV. Readers can also get the astronaut perspective from Buzz Aldrin himself in Look to the Stars, and can very convincingly place themselves in a virtual mission by reading the second-person narration of Faith McNulty and Stephen Kellogg’s If You Decide to Go to the Moon, winner of the 2006 Boston Globe–Horn Book Award for Nonfiction.

Not all children have had equal opportunities to see themselves as space explorers, however, as the barriers faced by women and people of color attempting to enter the space program (at least in the United States) were not overcome until the late 1970s. Tanya Lee Stone’s noteworthy Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream presents an unvarnished history of the “Mercury 13”—the accomplished women who tried but failed to get into the American space program in the early 1960s—and the times in which they lived. A good space book like this one compels readers to discuss its implications, perhaps with their elders who lived through this era, to reflect on what still hasn’t changed about our expectations for women in space, and to appreciate
what has.

What era are we living in today? Although we’ve had two more prominent space programs—the space shuttle and the International Space Station—there doesn’t seem to be similar enthusiasm in the book world to produce compelling stories about the last few decades of American efforts in piloted space missions. Do peacetime international cooperative agreements and an increased commercial outsourcing lack the frisson of the Cold War quest for space domination? With now hundreds of astronauts walking the Earth, do none stand out in our collective mind? Sure, there are plenty of lower quality books diagramming rocket parts or providing hero bios of various astronauts, but few are noteworthy. Two notable books about more recent space technologies (Floating in Space and The International Space Station) come, not surprisingly, from Franklyn M. Branley and the Let’s-Read series again, this time illustrated by True Kelley, but, published in 1998 and 2000, respectively, they’re starting to show their age.

Perhaps it is because the coolest missions going on right now are the human-free, computer-controlled ones. A series of trips to Mars in the past decade, fronted by the appealing
Wall-E-like rovers, have been featured in superior books such as the latest in this category, Cars on Mars: Roving the Red Planet by Alexandra Siy. Hopefully the upcoming NASA missions, even sans humans, will spark additional interest. Or perhaps it will be the scientists, not astronauts, who serve to inspire and motivate the next generation of space dreamers. n

 

Danielle J. Ford is a Horn Book reviewer and an associate professor in the school of education at the University of Delaware.

 

Good Space Books

Look to the Stars (Putnam, 2009) by Buzz Aldrin; illus. by Wendell Minor

Floating in Space [Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science] (HarperCollins, 1998) by Franklyn M. Branley; illus. by True Kelley

The International Space Station [Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science] (HarperCollins, 2000) by Franklyn M. Branley; illus. by True Kelley

The Moon Seems to Change [Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science] (Crowell, 1960) by Franklyn M. Branley; illus. by Helen Borten (reissued by HarperCollins in 1987 with illus. by Barbara and Ed Emberley)

What Makes Day and Night? [Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science] (Crowell, 1961) by Franklyn M. Branley; illus. by Helen Borten (reissued by HarperCollins in 1986 with illus. by Arthur Dorros)

Mission Control, This Is Apollo: The Story of the First Voyages to the Moon (Viking, 2009) by Andrew Chaikin; illus. by Alan Bean

Moonshot: The Flight of Apollo 11 (Jackson/Atheneum, 2009) by Brian Floca

Looking for Life in the Universe: The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence [Scientists in the Field] (Houghton, 2002) by Ellen Jackson; photos by Nic Bishop

Boy, Were We Wrong about the Solar System! (Dutton, 2008) by Kathleen V. Kudlinski; illus. by John Rocco

If You Decide to Go to the Moon (Scholastic, 2005) by Faith McNulty; illus. by Steven Kellogg

Find the Constellations (Houghton, 1954) by H. A. Rey

The Stars (Houghton, 1952) by H. A. Rey

Exploring our Solar System (Crown, 2003) by Sally Ride and Tam O’Shaughnessy

Mystery of Mars (Crown, 1999) by Sally Ride and Tam O’Shaughnessy

Voyager: An Adventure to the Edge of the Solar System [Face to Face with Science] (Crown, 1992) by Sally Ride and Tam O’Shaughnessy

Space, Stars, and the Beginning of Time: What the Hubble Telescope Saw (Clarion, 2011) by Elaine Scott

Comets, Meteors, and Asteroids (Morrow, 1994) by Seymour Simon

Destination: Space (HarperCollins, 2002) by Seymour Simon

Our Solar System (Morrow, 1992) by Seymour Simon (revised edition from HarperCollins, 2007)

Venus (Morrow, 1992) by Seymour Simon

Starry Messenger: A Book Depicting the Life of a Famous Scientist, Mathematician, Astronomer, Philosopher, Physicist, Galileo Galilei (Foster/Farrar, 1996) by Peter Sís

Cars on Mars: Roving the Red Planet (Charlesbridge, 2009) by Alexandra Siy

Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream (Candlewick, 2009) by Tanya Lee Stone

Planet Hunter: Geoff Marcy and the Search for Other Earths (Boyds Mills, 2010) by Vicki Oransky Wittenstein

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Ballot #1, test 1 http://www.hbook.com/2015/07/blogs/calling-caldecott/ballot-1-test-1/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/07/blogs/calling-caldecott/ballot-1-test-1/#respond Tue, 07 Jul 2015 01:30:22 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=8496 The post Ballot #1, test 1 appeared first on The Horn Book.

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Fall 2011 Horn Book Guide Online: New Reviews http://www.hbook.com/2015/07/choosing-books/horn-book-guide/fall-2011-horn-book-guide-online-new-reviews/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/07/choosing-books/horn-book-guide/fall-2011-horn-book-guide-online-new-reviews/#respond Tue, 07 Jul 2015 01:27:00 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=6201 On October, 10, 2011, we added 1,645 new titles (and authors and illustrators) to the Horn Book Guide Online, a comprehensive, fully searchable database of over 80,000 reviews. The new reviews also appear in the print edition of the Horn Book Guide published this month — but Guide Online subscribers can read the reviews today. Here’s a […]

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On October, 10, 2011, we added 1,645 new titles (and authors and illustrators) to the Horn Book Guide Online, a comprehensive, fully searchable database of over 80,000 reviews. The new reviews also appear in the print edition of the Horn Book Guide published this month — but Guide Online subscribers can read the reviews today. Here’s a list of the new titles just added:

Preschool
A Little Bit of Love
A Suitcase Surprise for Mommy
Astonishing Animal ABC
Baby Badger’s Wonderful Night
Baby Says “Moo!”
Baby’s First Year!
Bear in Love
Beautiful Blue Eyes
Because
Bed Hog
Bee & Bird
Before You Came
Big Brothers Don’t Take Naps
Birdsong
Brownie & Pearl Take a Dip
Bunny’s Lessons
Cat Secrets
Catch That Baby!
Check It Out!
Chew, Chew, Gulp!
Chicks Run Wild
Chuckling Ducklings
Colores de la vida
Count 1 to 10
Do You Know Which Ones Will Grow?
Farmyard Beat
Get Happy
Giggle, Giggle, Quack
Goodnight, Goodnight, Construction Site
Hey Diddle Diddle
Hide-and-Squeak
Hurry Down to Derry Fair
I Love My Mommy
I Love to Dance
I Love to Sing
I Love Vacations
I Must Have Bobo!
If Rocks Could Sing
If You’re Hoppy
I’ll Be There
I’m a Shark
Job Site
Kitten’s Summer
Leap Back Home to Me
Little Bea
Little Mist
Little Mouse’s Big Secret
Loon Baby
Maisy Goes to the City
Mama, Why?
Meow Said the Cow
Mine!
Mitchell’s License
Monday Is One Day
Monkey Truck
My Ducky Buddy
My Farm Friends
My Princess Boy
Oliver
Once upon a Bathtime
One Foot, Two Feet
One Little Blueberry
Over in Australia
Panda-Monium!
Penny Loves Pink
Pond Babies
Pretty Princess Pig
Purple Little Bird
Quiet Bunny’s Many Colors
Rain Brings Frogs
Ribbit Rabbit
Richard Scarry’s Best Busy Year Ever
Sleepy Time
Spot It Again!
Surprise! Surprise!
Take Care of Me from A to Z
That’s How!
The Best Birthday Ever!
The Hidden Alphabet
The Loud Book!
The Sleepless Little Vampire
The Underpants Zoo
The World Champion of Staying Awake
Today Is Monday in New York
Today with Meg and Ted
Two Little Chicks
We Love Our School!
What’s Special About Me, Mama?
When Mama Can’t Sleep
Who’s There?
Without You
You Are a Gift to the World / The World Is a Gift to You
Your Mommy Was Just like You

Picture Books
2011
A Book for Black-Eyed Susan
A Cat like That
A Mango in the Hand
A Pet for Miss Wright
A Pet for Petunia
A Photo for Greta
Adelaide
Al Pha’s Bet
Along a Long Road
Animals Home Alone
Ants in Your Pants, Worms in Your Plants!
Arthur Turns Green
At This Very Moment
Babo’s Cookie Problem
Barry B. Wary
Bear in Pink Underwear
Bear with Me
Bedtime for Bear
Best in Show
Betty Bunny Loves Chocolate Cake
Big Wolf & Little Wolf
Billie the Unicorn
Blackout
Bluebird Finds a Home
Boy Wonders
Brownie Groundhog and the February Fox
Buglette the Messy Sleeper
Camp K-9
Can Hens Give Milk?
Charlie the Ranch Dog
Chicken Butt’s Back!
City Numbers
Cloudette
Cookiebot!
Daddy Adventure Day
Dear Tabby
Dino-Basketball
Dog in Boots
Donald & Benoit
Donovan’s Big Day
Doodleday
Dorje’s Stripes
Earth to Clunk
Elmer and the Rainbow
Every Cowgirl Needs Dancing Boots
Fairly Fairy Tales
Fancy Nancy
Fancy Nancy
Fandango Stew
Felicity & Cordelia
Ferret Fun
Forsythia & Me
Fortunately, Unfortunately
Fox and Hen Together
Fox on the Ice / Maageesees Maskwameek Kaapit
Froggy Goes to Hawaii
Fuddles
Gilbert Goldfish Wants a Pet
Gilbert the Hero
Goldie and the Three Hares
Gracie the Lighthouse Cat
Grandma’s Wedding Album
Happy 100th Day!
Happy Birthday, Big Bad Wolf
Happy Valentine’s Day, Curious George!
Hide and Sheep
Hogwash!
Hopper and Wilson
Hot, Hot Roti for Dada-ji
How to Get a Job–By Me, the Boss
Hush, Little Beachcomber
If I Never Forever Endeavor
If I Were a Mouse
If You Love a Horse Tale
I’m Me!
Jacob Goes to the Doctor and Sophie Visits the Dentist
Jam & Honey
Jonathan and the Big Blue Boat
Jumping Jenny
Just in Time, Abraham Lincoln
Kylie Kangaroo’s Karate Kickers
Ladder to the Moon
Ladybug Girl and the Bug Squad
Lana Llama’s Little Lamb
Larry Gets Lost in Texas
Late for School
Leader of the Pack
Little Croc’s Purse
Looking for the Easy Life
Madeline at the White House
Mama and Me
Maxwell Moose’s Mountain Monster
Mighty Mike Builds a Ball Field
Mighty Mike Builds a Library
Mighty Mike Builds a Nature Trail
Mighty Mike Does What’s Right!
Migrant
Miss Smith Under the Ocean
Molly Makes Friends
Monkey See, Monkey Draw
Monsters, Mind Your Manners!
Mr. Duck Means Business
Mudkin
My Cat Isis
My Name Is Not Alexander
My Tattooed Dad
New Red Bike
Nina Nandu’s Nervous Noggin
No Fair Science Fair
Noodle & Lou
Now It Is Summer
Octopus Soup
Oh, Harry!
Oliver Otter’s Own Office
Olivia Says Goodbye to Grandpa
Ollie & Moon
Owl Howl
Painter and Ugly
Panda’s Valentine’s Day
Paul Bunyan vs. Hals Halson
Pelly and Mr. Harrison Visit the Moon
Pick a Pup
Picnic at Camp Shalom
Piggies in the Kitchen
Pirates of the Sea!
Play Ball, Jackie!
Poindexter Makes a Friend
Polka Dot Penguin Pottery
Polly Porcupine’s Painting Prizes
Pool Party
Pretend
Princess Kim and Too Much Truth
Princess Palooza
Princess Peepers Picks a Pet
Princess to the Rescue
Princess Zelda and the Frog
Quacky Baseball
Quentin Quokka’s Quick Questions
Questions, Questions
Raj the Bookstore Tiger
Rapunzel and the Seven Dwarfs
Relativity
Rope ‘Em!
Roscoe and the Pelican Rescue
Roses for Isabella
Rosie Raccoon’s Rock and Roll Raft
Say Hello to Zorro!
Scaredy Squirrel Has a Birthday Party
School for Bandits
Seven Days of Daisy
Shoes for Me!
Shoot for the Moon!
Slightly Invisible
Small Saul
Snow Rabbit, Spring Rabbit
Soccer Hour
Splish, Splash, Splat!
Splish, Splat!
Square Cat
Suki, the Very Loud Bunny
Summer Jackson
Super-Dragon
Supposing…
Tallulah’s Tutu
Ten Moonstruck Piglets
Ten Rules You Absolutely Must Not Break If You Want to Survive the School Bus
The Best Birthday Party Ever!
The Big Wish
The Blues Go Extreme Birding
The Boy Who Cried Ninja
The Crossing
The Crows of Pearblossom
The Cycling Wangdoos
The Day Dirk Yeller Came to Town
The Day Tiger Rose Said Goodbye
The Dog Who Loved Red
The Dragon and the Turtle Go on Safari
The Goodbye Cancer Garden
The Great Eggscape
The Great Race
The Hole in the Middle
The Last Day of Kindergarten
The Legend of Messy M’Cheany
The Little Black Dog Has Puppies
The Magic Brush
The Multiplying Menace Divides
The Next Door Bear
The Pickle-Chiffon Pie Olympics
The Really Groovy Story of the Tortoise and the Hare
The Runaway Wok
The Seven Seas
The Story of the Leprechaun
The Summer Visitors
The Three Bully Goats
The Town That Fooled the British
The Ugly Duckling Dinosaur
The Very Fairy Princess Takes the Stage
The Voyage of Turtle Rex
The Woods
The Year of the Rabbit
The Yellow House
Thelonious Mouse
There’s a Dragon in the Library
This Is the Game
This Plus That
Thomas the T. Rex
Three Bears of the Pacific Northwest
Three Hens and a Peacock
Tim and the Iceberg
Today, Maybe
Tumford the Terrible
Tyrannosaurus Dad
Up and Away with the Little Witch
Waddles
Wellington’s Rainy Day
What a Team!
What Are You Doing?
When a Dragon Moves In
When Katie’s Parents Separated
When Martha’s Away
Why Do I Have to Make My Bed?
Willow and the Snow Day Dance
Wink
Wonder Woman
Woof Meow Tweet-Tweet
You Can Be a Friend!
You’re Finally Here!
Yuvi’s Candy Tree
Zoomer’s Summer Snowstorm

Easy Readers
A Green, Green Garden
A Monster Is Coming!
Annie and Snowball and the Book Bugs Club
Baby Bear, Baby Bear, What Do You See?
Barn Storm
Big Bird at Home
Biscuit and the Lost Teddy Bear
Black Beauty and the Thunderstorm
Black Beauty Stolen!
Carl and the Baby Duck
Carl and the Puppies
Cork & Fuzz
Curious George
Dixie
Ducks Go Vroom
Ducks in a Row
Dude
Flappy and Scrappy
Flip Flop!
Fred and Ted’s Road Trip
Go West, Amelia Bedelia!
Harry Cat and Tucker Mouse
I Broke My Trunk!
Joe and Sparky, Superstars!
Marley
Martha Speaks
Now You See Me…
Off to School!
Olivia Plants a Garden
Panda Bear, Panda Bear, What Do You See?
Patrick in “A Teddy Bear’s Picnic and Other Stories”
Pony Scouts
Should I Share My Ice Cream?
Silly Lilly in “What Will I Be Today?”
Splat the Cat Sings Flat
The Abandoned Lighthouse
Three Strikes for Rotten Ralph
Trucks Line Up
Tugg and Teeny

Younger Fiction
A Crazy Day with Cobras
Attack of the Shark-Headed Zombie
Bad Kitty Meets the Baby
Blueberry Queen
Daisy Dawson at the Beach
Daisy for President
Daisy’s Fall Festival
Daisy’s Field Trip Adventure
Daisy’s Summer Essay
Dinkin Dings and the Frightening Things
Flying Feet
Fractions = Trouble!
Frankly, Frannie
Good Luck, Anna Hibiscus!
Have Fun, Anna Hibiscus!
Heidi
Invisible Inkling
Lucy on the Ball
Magic at the Bed and Biscuit
Martha and Skits Out West
Paw Power
Stink and the Ultimate Thumb-Wrestling Smackdown
The Adventures of Sir Gawain the True
The African Safari Discovery
The Case of the Library Monster
The Case of the Missing Moose
The Fenway Foul-Up
The Ferret’s a Foot
The Golden Ghost
The Pinstripe Ghost
White House Dog
Wishes and Wings
Yatimah
Zapato Power

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In which we learn how to keep our jobs http://www.hbook.com/2015/07/blogs/read-roger/learn-keep-jobs/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/07/blogs/read-roger/learn-keep-jobs/#respond Tue, 07 Jul 2015 01:24:38 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=9151 The Digital Shift offers a link to a neat code-learning program

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The Digital Shift offers a link to a neat code-learning program

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