The Horn Book http://www.hbook.com Publications about books for children and young adults Fri, 31 Oct 2014 20:43:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.4 Week in Review, October 27th-31st http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/news/week-review-october-27th-31st/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/news/week-review-october-27th-31st/#respond Fri, 31 Oct 2014 20:43:05 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=42746 This week on hbook.com… Preview the November/December 2014 issue of The Horn Book Magazine John Green’s 2014 Sutherland lecture: “Does YA Mean Anything Anymore? Genre in a Digitized World” “Self service“: What self-publishers don’t know about children’s books (Nov./Dec. 2014 editorial) “Board Book Roundup: Fall 2014 Edition” Nonfiction Notes: Unexplained phenomena, memoir, domestic animals, big […]

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This week on hbook.com…

Preview the November/December 2014 issue of The Horn Book Magazine

John Green’s 2014 Sutherland lecture: “Does YA Mean Anything Anymore? Genre in a Digitized World”

Self service“: What self-publishers don’t know about children’s books (Nov./Dec. 2014 editorial)

Board Book Roundup: Fall 2014 Edition

Nonfiction Notes: Unexplained phenomena, memoir, domestic animals, big ideas, and cookery

Reviews of the Week:

  • Picture Book:
  • Fiction: 
  • Nonfiction:
  • App: Millie’s Book of Tricks and Treats Vol. 2

Read Roger: What’s Going On

Out of the Box:

Calling Caldecott:

Lolly’s Classroom: Science and stereotypes

Events calendar

See overviews of previous weeks by clicking the tag week in review. Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook to keep up-to-date on our articles!

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Halloween boooOOOoooks roundup http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/blogs/out-of-the-box/halloween/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/blogs/out-of-the-box/halloween/#respond Fri, 31 Oct 2014 19:19:57 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=42714 Halloween is here — and so are Halloween books! Here are some recent recommended titles for you to share (perhaps through All Hallow’s Read?) with your little goblins. Horn BOO! 2014 Baby Horn BOO! 2014: Halloween-y board books Halloween-themed Notes from the Horn Book: 5Q for Julie Berry, eerie places, off-the-wall picture books, atmospheric audiobooks, […]

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all hallows read 2014 Halloween boooOOOoooks roundupHalloween is here — and so are Halloween books! Here are some recent recommended titles for you to share (perhaps through All Hallow’s Read?) with your little goblins.

Horn BOO! 2014

Baby Horn BOO! 2014: Halloween-y board books

Halloween-themed Notes from the Horn Book: 5Q for Julie Berry, eerie places, off-the-wall picture books, atmospheric audiobooks, and YA supernatural baddies

Millie’s Book of Tricks and Treats Vol. 2 app

Click on the tag Halloween books for previous years’ recommendations.

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Baby Horn BOO! 2014 http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/blogs/out-of-the-box/baby-horn-boo-2014/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/blogs/out-of-the-box/baby-horn-boo-2014/#respond Fri, 31 Oct 2014 18:46:04 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=42732 In “Horn BOO!” we recommend our favorite new Halloween titles for big(ger) kids; here are some new festive board books for the littlest trick-or-treaters. For more Halloween board books, check out last year’s “Baby Horn BOO!” — and for more great board books to share all year round, see our our fall board book roundup. […]

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In “Horn BOO!” we recommend our favorite new Halloween titles for big(ger) kids; here are some new festive board books for the littlest trick-or-treaters. For more Halloween board books, check out last year’s “Baby Horn BOO!” — and for more great board books to share all year round, see our our fall board book roundup.

rockwell apples and pumpkins Baby Horn BOO! 2014Author Anne Rockwell and illustrator Lizzy Rockwell’s seasonal classic Apples and Pumpkins (1989) follows a pigtailed, rosy-cheeked little girl and her parents on a visit to a local farm, where they pick apples from the orchard and a pumpkin from the patch. On Halloween night, the family puts out their newly carved jack-o’-lantern, the girl’s mother hands out the shiny red apples, and the girl trick-or-treats on their street. As in the original picture book, this new board-book edition showcases the spare text and autumn-hued illustrations with plenty of breathing room. (Little Simon)

dewdney llama llama trick or treat Baby Horn BOO! 2014Anna Dewney’s Llama Llama Trick or Treat is one in a series of six board-book adventures starring the beloved little guy. Here Llama Llama, on a shopping excursion with his llama mama, excitedly scopes out Halloween decorations and other kids’ ensembles. He test-drives costumes (“An astronaut? A bumblebee?”) and picks out the perfect pumpkin. Back at home, he and his friends carve their jack-o’-lanterns and prepare candy to hand out. Llama Llama then goes trick-or-treating in vampire garb and with parents in tow. Dewdney’s brief rhyming text and textured paintings — full of her familiar anthropomorphized animal characters — make for a toddler-friendly introduction to Halloween festivities. (Viking)

fry itsy bitsy pumpkin Baby Horn BOO! 2014In The Itsy Bitsy Pumpkin written by Sonali Fry and illustrated by Sanja Rescek, the titular jack-o’-lantern accidentally rolls away from home. A little-girl witch on her broomstick stops to give the pumpkin a ride back to his patch, where the warm-toned illustrations show him reunited with his smiling jack-o’-lantern family and several friendly critters in Halloween attire. The “Itsy-Bitsy Spider”–based verse may be a bit twee for parents, but toddlers will catch on quickly and sing along. (Little Simon)

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Editorial: Self Service http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/opinion/editorials/editorial-self-service/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/opinion/editorials/editorial-self-service/#respond Fri, 31 Oct 2014 15:33:48 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=42455 The Horn Book website was alight last month with a discussion of self-
publishing books for children. It began when I posted my thoughts on the subject in response to an email I received querying our policy of not reviewing books written and published by the same person. Like most good discussions, it was both heated […]

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The Horn Book website was alight last month with a discussion of self-
publishing books for children. It began when I posted my thoughts on the subject in response to an email I received querying our policy of not reviewing books written and published by the same person. Like most good discussions, it was both heated and informative, and you can read the whole thing here.

Self-publishing is certainly far from the days of the now-closed Vantage Press, leader of the pack of vanity presses who charged authors a fee to publish their books (aren’t the authors the ones supposed to be getting paid?) and who peppered review journals with copies of books that in a just world would have remained unsent, if not unwritten. You didn’t even have to open one to know it for what it was; the cheap binding and cheaper book jacket announced its provenance loudly. I’m sure these presses had no expectation of getting reviews; mailing us their books was simply cover for them with any authors curious about what kind of “marketing,” promised in the pricey contract, they were getting.

It’s a different world now. While much of what I see of self-publishing for children remains almost unfathomably clueless, there is a lot more range now, in production values, quality of writing, and sense of a market. But there is simply a lot more now, too, far more than we can even quietly dispose of in a systematic way. And given that there must be a pony, how do we find it? I’m open to suggestions.

What this discussion has given me more than anything is an understanding of the part publishing plays in turning manuscripts into books. It’s more than mechanical and financial. It means there is someone to say no. No, or “not yet,” or “try this instead,” or “I’ve seen better from you.” It is true that self-publishers of both kids’ and adult books now frequently employ freelance editors, designers, illustrators, marketers, etc. But when the author is the one paying all of these people, the best interests of the book will not inevitably prevail. As Molly Idle, author-illustrator of Flora and the Penguin, reviewed on page 70, said in a recent Talks with Roger interview, “It’s a collaborative process, making books. It would be so easy to keep hold of this little idea that is precious to you. But in sharing it, collaborating with editors and art directors, it becomes something even more. And hopefully better than you could ever have come up with if you had just kept it all to yourself.”

We don’t need to idealize publishing — which in fact doesn’t say no as often as it should — to understand the value of an institution that brings writers and illustrators not just into cooperation with talented book-makers but into communion with a great heritage. Whether Coraline or Carolyn Keene, that heritage has been nurtured by the Horn Book for ninety years now. In the spirited and smart, if largely self-interested, comments from self-publishers that followed my post, I saw passion and hard work but also writers working largely in ignorance of a great tradition. How can we make them part of the family?

From the November/December issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

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Horn Book Magazine – November/December 2014 http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/choosing-books/horn-book-magazine/horn-book-magazine-novemberdecember-2014/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/choosing-books/horn-book-magazine/horn-book-magazine-novemberdecember-2014/#respond Fri, 31 Oct 2014 15:15:25 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=42439 Table of Contents Features “Does YA Mean Anything Anymore?: Genre in a Digitized World” by John Green The author’s 2014 Zena Sutherland Lecture. “Thom’s Rules of Order” by Thom Barthelmess Ten tips for good book discussion. “House Hunters: Storyland Edition” by Ron Koertge In which the Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe finds new […]

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november2014cover 200x300 Horn Book Magazine   November/December 2014

Table of Contents


Features

“Does YA Mean Anything Anymore?: Genre in a Digitized World” by John Green
The author’s 2014 Zena Sutherland Lecture.

“Thom’s Rules of Order” by Thom Barthelmess
Ten tips for good book discussion.

“House Hunters: Storyland Edition” by Ron Koertge
In which the Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe finds new digs.


Columns

Editorial
“Self Service” by Roger Sutton
What self-publishers don’t know about children’s books.

The Writer’s Page
“Beyond the Magically (Dis)abled” by Cammie McGovern
#WeNeedDiverseBooks…about disability.

Field Notes
“What Happened to the Frog?” by Jonathan Hunt
Jon Klassen, Mo Willems, and the Common Core.

From The Guide
“Steampunk for Tweens and Teens”
A selection of reviews from The Horn Book Guide.


Reviews

Holiday High Notes
Book Reviews
Audiobook Reviews


Departments

Letters to the Editor
November/December Starred Books
Impromptu
On the Web
Index to Advertisers
Index to Books Reviewed


Cover from Santa Clauses. © 2014 by Chuck Groenink. Page 1 art from Here Comes Santa Cat. © 2014 by Claudia Rueda.


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Science and stereotypes http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/blogs/lollys-classroom/science-stereotypes/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/blogs/lollys-classroom/science-stereotypes/#comments Thu, 30 Oct 2014 20:07:54 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=42393 I’d like to start this post with a little thought exercise. Close your eyes and picture a scientist. What is your scientist doing? What does your scientist look like? If you are anything like my second graders, you’ve conjured up the stereotypical scientist: a man in a white lab coat with crazy hair who is […]

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I’d like to start this post with a little thought exercise.

Close your eyes and picture a scientist. What is your scientist doing? What does your scientist look like?

If you are anything like my second graders, you’ve conjured up the stereotypical scientist: a man in a white lab coat with crazy hair who is tinkering with various chemicals and concoctions.

And if you’re a teacher like me, you are worried about how such stereotyped thinking limits your students’ visions of what they or other people can become and accomplish.

One of mt primary goals for my second graders in rural Maine is to become more aware of the world around them. As someone who is interested in social justice, I also aspire to have them recognize injustices and to envision a different world than the one we currently inhabit.

While my students and I discuss and analyze stereotypes throughout the year, I begin this work with one of our first science lessons. Prior to delving into our science curriculum, I ask my students to do just what I asked you to do at the beginning of this post: pause and picture what they think a scientist looks like and does. I then ask them to draw that image and then post it in a “scientist gallery.”

Once we have our gallery, we have a discussion about what we notice about our images — how they are similar to and how they might be different from one another. This leads into a conversation about how the stereotyped image of a scientist is, in fact, just one narrow version of what scientists actually do.

I follow this lesson in subsequent days by reading aloud different picture books about scientists in order to broaden my students’ thinking about what science really is and what scientists actually do. Two books in particular have proven particularly effective for achieving these objectives.

me jane Science and stereotypes       on a beam of light Science and stereotypes

First, Me…Jane by Patrick McDonnell. This biography focuses on the childhood of Jane Goodall, the famous primatologist. My students are always captivated by this charming text and the parallels that they can draw between Jane’s early life and their own lives. We discuss whether Jane was always a scientist, or whether it was something she became when she grew up — a conversation that helps my students envision themselves as genuine scientists.

The second book, On a Beam of Light by Jennifer Byrne, illustrated by Vladimir Radunsky, is a biography of one of the most prolific scientists of all time, Albert Einstein. While Einstein arguably meets many of the criteria of the stereotyped scientist, this book does a fantastic job of tracing Einstein’s childhood and emphasizing that he was not born an incredible scientist, but rather honed his insights and made his discoveries by asking questions and doggedly pursuing them with insatiable curiosity. Like Me…Jane, this is a book that helps my students realize that everyone was once a child, just like them.

These quality books and our deconstruction of stereotypes of scientists help science work in my classroom get off to a solid start, with all of my students seeing themselves as capable of carrying out scientific inquiry about the world around them.

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Millie’s Book of Tricks and Treats Vol. 2 app review http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/choosing-books/app-review-of-the-week/millies-book-tricks-treats-vol-2-app-review/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/choosing-books/app-review-of-the-week/millies-book-tricks-treats-vol-2-app-review/#respond Thu, 30 Oct 2014 19:02:58 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=42698 Intrepid adventurer dog Millie is back in Halloween-themed offering Millie’s Book of Tricks and Treats Vol. 2 (Millie Was Here series; Megapops, 2012). Knock on each of ten front doors in Millie’s neighborhood to spin a game show–style wheel and receive either a video “trick” (e.g., “Millie Performs an Amazing Yo-Yo Trick,” “Millie Teleports All […]

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millie tricks and treats menu Millies Book of Tricks and Treats Vol. 2 app reviewIntrepid adventurer dog Millie is back in Halloween-themed offering Millie’s Book of Tricks and Treats Vol. 2 (Millie Was Here series; Megapops, 2012).

Knock on each of ten front doors in Millie’s neighborhood to spin a game show–style wheel and receive either a video “trick” (e.g., “Millie Performs an Amazing Yo-Yo Trick,” “Millie Teleports All Over the Place”) or “treat” (spooky-fied bacon treats such as “Frankenbacon”). Judging from the not-too-scary decorations, it seems Millie’s neighborhood includes friendly families of werewolves, mad scientists, aliens, and vampires. A theremin-and-harpsichord waltz continues the Halloween-y mood. Every screen also offers a scratch-off picture of Millie modeling a different costume and a hidden sticker of a creepy-cute creature. Collect badges by finding all of the stickers and reading through the entire app. Each read-through offers slightly different content as the app cycles through a wide range of trick and treat videos and costumed Millie snapshots.

millie tricks and treats mad scientist door Millies Book of Tricks and Treats Vol. 2 app review

Trick-or-treat!

millie tricks and treats open door Millies Book of Tricks and Treats Vol. 2 app review

a trick: “Millie Knits You a Nice, Warm Sweater”

As in previous Millie Was Here apps, the humor lies in the juxtaposition of the off-screen narrator’s bombastic voice-over and the equally over-the-top title cards with Millie’s mundane doggy activities and interests. In the trick “Millie Turns into a Vicious Werewolf,” for instance, the small, snuggly dog looks up at a projected moon while a horror-movie-worthy wolf howl plays. Many of the videos show hands of human assistants offering treats and helping Millie perform her various tricks; the intentionally low-tech effects are part of the series’ considerable charm.

The navigation is straightforward — just forward and back buttons — and the app requires no reading. Music, narration, text highlighting, touch hints, and sticker hints may be turned on or off and volume may be adjusted (some of these settings are accessible from the navigation bar at the bottom of each screen, others in a parent-locked info section). A “bedtime mode” dims the screen slightly and disables the sticker hunt for a more soothing experience. Tips for keeping pets happy and safe on “Howl-o-ween” are appended.

Available for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch (requires iOS 6.0 or later); $0.99. Recommended for preschool and primary users.

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Board Book Roundup: Fall 2014 Edition http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/using-books/board-book-roundup-fall-2014-edition/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/using-books/board-book-roundup-fall-2014-edition/#comments Thu, 30 Oct 2014 16:00:11 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=42541 This column is part of a series of recommended board book roundups, formerly published twice a year, now published every season. You can find the previous installments here. Don’t miss Viki Ash’s primer “What Makes a Good Board Book?” from the March/April 2010 Horn Book Magazine. 1-2-3 Peas by Keith Baker Little Simon     36 pp. […]

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This column is part of a series of recommended board book roundups, formerly published twice a year, now published every season. You can find the previous installments here. Don’t miss Viki Ash’s primer “What Makes a Good Board Book?” from the March/April 2010 Horn Book Magazine.

baker 123peas boardbk2 Board Book Roundup: Fall 2014 Edition1-2-3 Peas
by Keith Baker
Little Simon     36 pp.
5/14     978-1-4424-9928-7     $7.99
“Five peas painting— / brush, brush, brush, / Six peas traveling— / rush, rush, rush.” In this follow-up to Baker’s LMNO Peas, the peas row, splash, build, nap, and more, on and around large-size numerals from one to ten, then skip counting by tens to one hundred. The rhyming text bounces along as the spring-green peas frolic in the lively illustrations. The smaller trim size means much of the art’s amusing details are harder to see, but the colorful pages and fun-to-read-aloud rhymes will delight small listeners.

horacek time4bed boardbk Board Book Roundup: Fall 2014 EditionTime for Bed: Flip-Flap Fun
by Petr Horáček
Candlewick     16 pp.
9/14     978-0-7636-6779-5     $7.99
First it’s “time to play.” Then, after putting “away my toys,” it’s “time for supper.” A little boy’s recognizable end-of-the-day routine plays out in Horáček’s simple, comforting text and boldly colored illustrations. The thick graduated pages make it easy for small hands to interact with the book. After a bath, teeth brushing, and a story, the final page-turn shows the narrator for the first time, tucked into bed and gently reminding listeners that it’s “time to say good night.”

laden peekazoo boardbk Board Book Roundup: Fall 2014 EditionPeek-a-Zoo
by Nina Laden
Chronicle     24 pp.
3/14     978-1-4521-1175-9     $6.99
If a board book could be a considered a cult classic, Laden’s Peek-a Who? (2000) would be one. In this animal-themed follow-up (in a small format perfect for little hands), the pattern is the same. “Peek a” on the left-hand page faces what looks like a linocut design; a die-cut hole hints at what’s revealed on the following spread. “Mew!” accompanies a tiger; “Bamboo!” captions an image of a panda munching on its favorite food. A kangaroo and a cockatoo are also featured, as well as the cute creature reflected in the mirror on the final page: “You, too!” For babies and toddlers, this trick never grows old.

carle pandabear boardbk Board Book Roundup: Fall 2014 EditionPanda Bear, Panda Bear, What Do You See?
by Bill Martin Jr; illus. by Eric Carle
Holt     28 pp.
8/14     978-08050-9950-8     $12.99
This lap-size board book’s rhyming text follows the familiar pattern of the author/illustrator team’s Brown Bear, Brown Bear. A panda, water buffalo, spider monkey, whooping crane, and six other endangered species parade across the pages; at the end, a dreaming child sees all ten animals “wild and free.” Carle’s striking, brilliantly colored illustrations are as eye-catching as always, making this ideal for use with groups.

mckee elmer boardbkjpg Board Book Roundup: Fall 2014 EditionElmer
by David McKee
HarperFestival      32 pp.
8/14     978-0-06-232405-4     $7.99
Available in a board-book edition for the first time, Elmer has been everyone’s favorite patchwork elephant for twenty-five years. Though the other elephants in the herd love his jokes and games, Elmer wonders if they’re laughing at him because he looks different. He tries to blend in by covering up his colorful hide, but he can’t disguise what’s really special about him. The message about accepting yourself and celebrating differences isn’t likely to interest babies; older toddlers, however, will welcome Elmer into their herd.

mcphail babypigpigtalks boardbk Board Book Roundup: Fall 2014 EditionBaby Pig Pig Talks
by David McPhail
Charlesbridge     14 pp.
8/14     978-1-58089-597-2     $6.95

 

 

mcphail babypigpigwalks boardbk Board Book Roundup: Fall 2014 EditionBaby Pig Pig Walks
by David McPhail
Charlesbridge     14 pp.
8/14      978-1-58089-596-5     $6.95

Baby Pig Pig (Pig Pig Returns) reaches two developmental milestones in these original board books. In Talks, mother pig names everything they see during a stroller walk: “Snake. Taxi. Tricycle.” Baby Pig Pig repeats after her, sort of: “Hissa. Honka. Dinga.” An overly friendly dog gets him talking — “Mama!” In Walks, Baby Pig Pig wants to explore the world beyond his playpen. After some wobbly steps, he climbs out and heads off “…down the hallway…toward the kitchen” and right into his mother’s welcoming arms. The small adventures have just enough tension to keep little walkers and talkers enthralled.

sayre rahrah boardbk Board Book Roundup: Fall 2014 EditionRah, Rah, Radishes!: A Vegetable Chant
by April Pulley Sayre
Little Simon      34 pp.
7/14     978-1-4424-9927-0     $7.99
“Oh boy, bok choy! / Brussels sprout. / Broccoli. Cauliflower. / Shout it out!” Kids may not want to eat their greens, but they’ll dig right in to this colorful feast for the eyes and ears. Sayre’s energetic rhymes are accompanied by appetizing photos of a variety of veggies, many of which may be unfamiliar to small children. Bring this book along on your next trip to the farmers’ market and see how many vegetables you can find. Who knows? Maybe it will inspire some taste testing!

stiles todayimgoingtowear boardbk Board Book Roundup: Fall 2014 EditionToday I’m Going to Wear…
by Dan Stiles
POW!     18 pp.
10/14     978-1-57687-718-0     $9.95
“Today I think I’m going to wear a yellow ribbon in my hair.” In a pleasantly rhyming text, a little girl describes her hand-picked outfit, which includes a polka-dot cowboy hat, a too-small coat, “in case of sun, a parasol,” mittens, and rain boots. Stiles’s vibrant graphic illustrations are hard to resist; their hip, retro vibe will appeal to grownups and young kids alike.

wells drduck boardbook  Board Book Roundup: Fall 2014 EditionA Visit to Dr. Duck
by Rosemary Wells
Candlewick     30 pp.
8/14     978-0-7636-7229-4     7.99
Little guinea pig Felix eats too many “chocolate blimpies” and doesn’t feel well the next day. His mama tries chamomile tea and fresh air; finally, she takes him to see Dr. Duck. Originally published in hardcover as Felix Feels Better (2000), this edition’s title change puts the focus on going to the doctor — and Felix’s nervousness about the experience will resonate with young listeners. Wells’s comforting tone and warm illustrations will reassure toddler and preschool patients.

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New York Times Best Illustrated list announced http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/blogs/calling-caldecott/new-york-times-best-illustrated-list-announced/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/blogs/calling-caldecott/new-york-times-best-illustrated-list-announced/#comments Thu, 30 Oct 2014 15:59:20 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=42668 Here it is! http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2014/10/30/books/review/2014-BEST-8.html?_r=1& Usually this list matches up pretty well with our Calling Caldecott list with one or two big surprises. This year I am finding more surprises than matches. But you can be sure we will be locating the books that weren’t so much on our radar and will weigh in as we […]

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Here it is! http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2014/10/30/books/review/2014-BEST-8.html?_r=1&

Usually this list matches up pretty well with our Calling Caldecott list with one or two big surprises. This year I am finding more surprises than matches. But you can be sure we will be locating the books that weren’t so much on our radar and will weigh in as we get our hands on them.

This list always seems to be a bit idiosyncratic. The team of three judges is comprised of one critic and two illustrators. This year they were Jennifer Brown (Bank Street College, Shelf Awareness), Brian Floca, and Jerry Pinkney. When Roger was on this committee, he said that rather than discussing the books together, each member added their favorites to the list, pretty much split evenly. I don’t know if this is how it always works, but the result is always an interesting list.  [See Roger's comment below: in fact they DID discuss titles together, but just from the lists that each judge sent to the NYT editor. So it was pretty much the same as other award committees. I guess what makes the NYT list so different from others must be that two judges are artists.]

Please let us know in the comments which of these you love (or don’t) and why. Now I have to go look for some books…

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Review of Because They Marched http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/choosing-books/review-of-the-week/review-marched/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/choosing-books/review-of-the-week/review-marched/#respond Wed, 29 Oct 2014 16:01:56 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=42468 Because They Marched: The People’s Campaign for Voting Rights That Changed America by Russell Freedman Middle School    Holiday    83 pp. 8/14    978-0-8234-2921-9    $20.00 e-book ed.  978-0-8234-3263-9    $20.00 With characteristically clear prose sprinkled liberally with primary source quotes and carefully selected photographs, Freedman documents the 1965 Selma-to-Montgomery march that featured the horrific Bloody Sunday confrontation between […]

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freeman because they marched Review of Because They MarchedBecause They Marched:
The People’s Campaign for Voting Rights That Changed America

by Russell Freedman
Middle School    Holiday    83 pp.
8/14    978-0-8234-2921-9    $20.00
e-book ed.  978-0-8234-3263-9    $20.00

With characteristically clear prose sprinkled liberally with primary source quotes and carefully selected photographs, Freedman documents the 1965 Selma-to-Montgomery march that featured the horrific Bloody Sunday confrontation between the marchers and the Alabama state troopers. Captured on television footage by all the major networks, these events convinced the nation — and Congress — that something finally had to be done. That something turned out to be the Voting Rights Act of 1965, “the crowning achievement of the civil rights movement.” Freedman’s introduction is particularly effective because it focuses on the teachers’ march to the courthouse to register as a major trigger for the movement: “For the first time, a recognized professional group from Selma’s black community had carried out an organized protest.” If the book is not quite as visually striking as its notable predecessor, Elizabeth Partridge’s Marching for Freedom (rev. 11/09), nor as invested in the youth participation, its later publication date allows the book to touch on the controversial 2013 Supreme Court decision that struck down key provisions of the Voting Rights Act. A timeline, source notes, selected bibliography, and an index are appended.

From the September/October 2014 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

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