The Horn Book http://www.hbook.com Publications about books for children and young adults Fri, 23 Jan 2015 23:44:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1 Week in Review, January 19th-23rd http://www.hbook.com/2015/01/news/week-review-january-19th-23rd/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/01/news/week-review-january-19th-23rd/#respond Fri, 23 Jan 2015 20:00:55 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=45860 This week on hbook.com… Reviews of the Week: Picture Book: The Bear Ate Your Sandwich by Julia Sarcone-Roach Fiction: Stella by Starlight by Sharon M. Draper — plus a Q&A for the author Nonfiction: Draw What You See: The Life and Art of Benny Andrews by Kathleen Benson; illus. with paintings by Benny Andrews App: Geography […]

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Week in Review

This week on hbook.com…

Reviews of the Week:

Read Roger:News from the North

Out of the Box:

Calling Caldecott:

Lolly’s Classroom:

Events calendar

See overviews of previous weeks by clicking the tag week in review. Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook to keep up-to-date on our articles!

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Calling Caldecott 2015 ballot #1 results http://www.hbook.com/2015/01/blogs/calling-caldecott/calling-caldecott-2015-ballot-1-results/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/01/blogs/calling-caldecott/calling-caldecott-2015-ballot-1-results/#comments Fri, 23 Jan 2015 16:59:42 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=45754 This is when it gets really exciting for Martha, Robin, and me. We had access to the secret link where we could see more and more votes come in yesterday. I stopped checking around 11 p.m. last night but got right back online at 6 a.m. If we count up the first-place votes, a total […]

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This is when it gets really exciting for Martha, Robin, and me. We had access to the secret link where we could see more and more votes come in yesterday. I stopped checking around 11 p.m. last night but got right back online at 6 a.m.

If we count up the first-place votes, a total of 296 people cast their ballots here. There were 286 second-place votes and 283 for third place. I guess some people figure fewer votes will give more weight to the books they really love, or they had one or two big favorites and just wanted to vote for those.

All three of us have done the full-ballot math, weighting the votes as the real committee would: 1st choice votes x 4; 2nd choice votes x 3; 3rd choice votes x 2; then add them all up for the total points. Phew! More power to Robin who has to do this kind of thing all year long.

Here are the results:

1st choice
(4 points)
2nd choice
(3 points)
3rd choice
(2 points)
Total points
The Adventures of Beekle
19 12 22 156
All Different Now
2 5 7 37
Bad Bye, Good Bye
13 7 11 95
Blizzard
8 17 19 121
Buried Sunlight
1 3 6 25
Draw!
14 13 12 119
The Farmer and the Clown
52 32 18 340
Firefly July
11 11 6 89
Gaston 12 12 14 112
Gravity
3 7 18 69
Hug Machine
5 13 10 79
The Iridescence of Birds
15 18 13 140
Josephine 16 15 8 125
Kid Sheriff and the Terrible Toads
4 7 9 55
A Letter for Leo
15 10 9 108
My Bus
1 0 4 12
My Grandfather’s Coat
6 6 12 66
Nana in the City
3 14 8 70
Neighborhood Sharks
5 7 6 53
The Pilot and the Little Prince
4 9 5 53
The Right Word
17 14 17 144
Quest
5 7 4 49
Sam & Dave Dig a Hole
27 29 21 237
Viva Frida
24 10 17 160
Winter Bees
14 8 6 92

 

Next we had to decide how many books to move over to the second ballot. With the magic of FluidSurveys and Excel, I was able to create this visual. (I tend to go cross-eyed looking at a list of numbers, but everything becomes clearer when I can see the relative differences.)

2015ballot1results

It’s clear that two books are at the front of the pack (with, actually, Marla Frazee’s Farmer and the Clown well ahead of Jon Klassen’s Sam & Dave Dig a Hole), and most of the rest are closer together. But it’s important to send a healthy number of titles onto the second ballot, because we might be surprised: once people are looking at a new group of books, votes will shift around. Someone whose favorites are no longer available will not necessarily cast their next votes for what seem now to be the frontrunners.

We decided to move all books getting 100 or more points onto the second ballot, which gives us eleven books out of the original twenty-five. For us, the second ballot will also be the final one. (On the real committee, they would keep voting until one book got the majority of first choice votes.)

Here are the books that will be on the final ballot, available Monday morning at 9 a.m. EST and closing at the same time Tuesday:

2015_ballot2_jackets

The Adventures of Beekle (Dan Santat)
Blizzard (John Rocco)
Draw! (Raúl Colón)
The Farmer and the Clown (Marla Frazee)
Gaston (Christian Robinson)
The Iridescence of Birds (Hadley Hooper)
Josephine (Christian Robinson)
A Letter for Leo (Sergio Ruzzier)
The Right Word (Melissa Sweet)
Sam & Dave Dig a Hole (Jon Klassen)
Viva Frida (Yuyi Morales)

Now it’s time, perhaps, to mourn a favorite book that didn’t make the cut-off and isn’t going to win here (but of course every book still has a chance with the real committee). You can also use the comments to try to persuade others to choose the book you think is most worthy. This is exactly what happens at this stage on the real committee. Here is where everyone becomes passionate (maybe even teary) and super-articulate.

 

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Veggies in undies: real-life remix http://www.hbook.com/2015/01/blogs/out-of-the-box/veggies-undies-real-life-remix/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/01/blogs/out-of-the-box/veggies-undies-real-life-remix/#comments Fri, 23 Jan 2015 16:06:05 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=45651 Hey, it’s an art form. Don’t knock it till you’ve tried it.

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Hey, it’s an art form. Don’t knock it till you’ve tried it.

Mutant carrot.

Mutant carrot.

Mutant carrot in undies.

Mutant carrot in undies.

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Caldecott ballots, tallies, and selection of honor books http://www.hbook.com/2015/01/blogs/calling-caldecott/caldecott-ballots-tallies-and-selection-of-honor-books/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/01/blogs/calling-caldecott/caldecott-ballots-tallies-and-selection-of-honor-books/#respond Fri, 23 Jan 2015 15:43:29 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=45750 Reprinted from pages 36 and 37 of the Randolph Caldecott Medal Committee Manual (ALA/ALSC June, 2009)   Balloting When there is consensus that all the books on the discussion list are fully discussed, the committee proceeds to a selection ballot. Certain procedures apply: Committee members list first, second, and third place votes for the award […]

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Reprinted from pages 36 and 37 of the Randolph Caldecott Medal Committee Manual (ALA/ALSC June, 2009)

 

Balloting

When there is consensus that all the books on the discussion list are fully discussed, the committee proceeds to a selection ballot. Certain procedures apply:

  • Committee members list first, second, and third place votes for the award on a selection ballot.
  • In tabulating ballot results, the tellers assign four points to each first place vote, three points to each second place vote, and two points to each third place vote.
  • There is a formula to determine the winner. A book must receive at least 8 first choices at four points per vote for a total of at least 32 points, and it must have an 8 point lead over the book receiving the next highest number of points.

 

Tally

Once balloting is complete, the tellers tabulate the results. The tabulations are double-checked, and the Chair reads the results aloud to the committee. Depending on the results, certain steps are taken:

  • If there is a winner, the committee proceeds to considering whether or not to select honor books.
  • If the first ballot does not produce a winner, the committee follows procedures for re- balloting.

 

Re-Balloting

The committee may not proceed to another ballot without a second round of book discussion. At this point, certain choices present themselves, and certain procedures apply:

  • By consensus the committee may choose to withdraw from the discussion list all titles that receive no votes on the first ballot.
  • By consensus the committee may choose to withdraw additional titles that received minimal support on the first ballot.
  • Once withdrawn from the discussion list, a book is permanently eliminated from consideration for the award.
  • Once a second round is complete, the committee proceeds to a second ballot.
  • On a second ballot (and, if necessary, all subsequent ballots), votes are tabulated by the tellers who use the same point system and formula as in the first round to determine a winner.
  • If after a second ballot, there is still no winner, the committee is required to re-open discussion and then re-ballot, alternating between discussion and re-balloting until a winner is selected.

 

Selection of Honor Books

Immediately following determination of the winner of the Caldecott Medal, and following appropriate discussion, the committee will entertain the following:

  • Whether honor books will be named.
  • Whether the committee wishes to choose as honor books the next highest books on the original winning ballot or to ballot again.
  • If the committee votes to use the award-winning ballot, they must then determine how many honor books to name.
  • If the committee chooses to ballot for honor books, only books that received points on the award winning ballot may be included. The same voting procedure is followed as for the award winner.
  • If the committee has chosen to ballot for honor books, following that ballot, the committee will vote how many books of those receiving the highest number of points are to be named honor books.

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Geography Drive Arcade app review http://www.hbook.com/2015/01/choosing-books/app-review-of-the-week/geography-drive-arcade-app-review/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/01/choosing-books/app-review-of-the-week/geography-drive-arcade-app-review/#respond Thu, 22 Jan 2015 19:30:41 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=45819 Spinlight Studio’s Geography Drive Arcade app (2013) quizzes users on their United States geography knowledge in an engaging way. The app has six sections: Study Map: This streamlined map of the U.S. shows the states color-coded by region, with all fifty capitals marked and labeled. Tap each state to go in-depth, accessing a page where […]

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geography arcade mapSpinlight Studio’s Geography Drive Arcade app (2013) quizzes users on their United States geography knowledge in an engaging way. The app has six sections:

Study Map: This streamlined map of the U.S. shows the states color-coded by region, with all fifty capitals marked and labeled. Tap each state to go in-depth, accessing a page where its silhouette and a list of facts (capital, size in square miles, date and chronological number order of statehood) accompany a brief overview of the state’s history. On the next screen, the state flag is displayed next to its time zone, nickname, abbreviation, state tree, state bird, highest geographical point, and a “Did you know?” trivia tidbit.

Might I suggest you spend some quality time with the study map before attempting the four games? That way you may avoid the utter embarrassment that was my performance in…

State Shape Challenge: In this game you match a state’s silhouette with its name by choosing from an alphabetical list.

geography arcade matching

My best score in this section was in the low 30s (it was not unlike these attempts, actually, except that I live in the U.S.). Ouch. I thought that was bad until I got to…

Flagstaff State Flag Game: Five various flags appear as the narrator prompts you to select the correct one for each state. Five misses, and it’s game over.

State Capital Challenge: As in the State Shape Challenge, a state’s silhouette appears — this time with its capital indicated with a star icon — alongside an alphabetical list of capitals. Match the capital to its correct state as a patriotic march plays.

Honolulu Spelling Bee: Finally, something I was good at. Each state’s silhouette appears as a friendly narrator prompts you to spell its name. There’s a “repeat” button for the spoken name in case you miss it (and, like me, can’t tell Illinois from Iowa by shape). Low-key, luau-worthy music plays in the background and a score card keeps track of your attempts.

Exit any game at any time to return to the main menu, where you can easily access the study map. From there you can also view your…

Trophy Case: Earn bronze, silver, and gold trophies for each game as you progress through six levels of state knowledge prowess. Your level, top trophy earned, and number of perfect scores for each game appear here. Your best score for each game is visible on the menu.

Upbeat background music, sound effects, and narration plus a straightforward navigation round out the presentation. Even though I was humiliatingly bad at most of the games, I did improve on subsequent rounds (and after some study of the study map) — so the app not only tests your states knowledge, it teaches you some, too.

Available for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch (requires iOS 6.0 or later); $0.99. Recommended for intermediate users and up.

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News from the North http://www.hbook.com/2015/01/blogs/read-roger/news-north/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/01/blogs/read-roger/news-north/#comments Thu, 22 Jan 2015 18:52:02 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=45823 Please forgive my long absence here; between Christmas and some family stuff I’ve been mostly out of the office for almost a month. And how things DO pile up: I am heartened by the advice of the late Booklist editor Edna Vanek, passed down to me by Betsy Hearne: “one book at a time.” That […]

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Please forgive my long absence here; between Christmas and some family stuff I’ve been mostly out of the office for almost a month. And how things DO pile up: I am heartened by the advice of the late Booklist editor Edna Vanek, passed down to me by Betsy Hearne: “one book at a time.” That is totally transferable advice, by the way.

 

VCFALast week I was up at Vermont College of Fine Arts in Montpelier, which someone told me was the smallest state capitol in the country. It is tiny. And cold. And in the middle of nowhe–Leda Schubert and Martha Walke, call off your dogs! But despite its, um, picturesque location, VCFA is definitely a happening place. I was up in the faculty lounge one evening talking to some friends when all this SHRIEKING came from below–the students had just learned who their faculty advisors were going to be for the current semester. WHY this involves such sorting-cap drama I don’t know but apparently it’s a tradition. Even if the place does look like something out The Wolves of Willoughby Chase, it’s no boarding school fantasy. I was impressed with both the students and the faculty’s expectations of them; this is a serious place. I’ll be writing more about VCFA in a forthcoming issue of the Magazine.

I was up there talking to the students about book reviewing, although, honestly, that’s really the last thing an aspiring writer should be paying attention to. Do you authors out there read your reviews? I wouldn’t.

 

 

KPKatherine Paterson was there as well, receiving an honorary degree from the College. You really haven’t lived until hearing Katherine read the chapter from The Great Gilly Hopkins where Gilly teaches William Ernest how to stand up for himself. The best damn anti-bullying curriculum I’ve ever experienced. I could listen to Katherine read all day, although I guess that wouldn’t leave her any time to write.

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The polls are open! http://www.hbook.com/2015/01/blogs/calling-caldecott/polls-open/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/01/blogs/calling-caldecott/polls-open/#comments Thu, 22 Jan 2015 14:00:36 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=45676 Come one, come all. The polls are now open! Here (and in the ballot button above) is your link to the ballot where you can vote until 9 a.m. EST tomorrow (Friday, January 23). We set up the ballot so you will vote for your first, second, and third place books, because that is how […]

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voting_booth_2015_draft2

Come one, come all. The polls are now open!

castyourballot_button_201x51

Here (and in the ballot button above) is your link to the ballot where you can vote until 9 a.m. EST tomorrow (Friday, January 23). We set up the ballot so you will vote for your first, second, and third place books, because that is how the actual Caldecott committee will be voting. Vote tallying is a somewhat complex matter with a point system that gives 4 points to first place votes, 3 points to second place, and 2 points to third place votes. Tallying the ballots involves a fair amount of math. Happily, Robin enjoys this task and even enrolls her second graders as math checkers. If you are interested in the finer points of this tallying system, here is a page with all the details, from the Caldecott manual.

Tomorrow at noon we will post the results of the first ballot and tell you what will be on the second ballot (open Monday a.m. to Tuesday a.m. EST). The real committee would keep discussing and voting until there was a clear winner: one book that gets first place votes from more than half the committee. But we have such a large group here that this would never work for us. We’ll cap it at two ballots and then declare the winner and honor books.

For those who want to think some more before voting, see the list below for a reminder of what is on the ballot (above).

I also promised Robin that I would once again wag a finger at all of you who might be inclined to use social media to drum up votes from all your friends and relations. We DO want you to spread the word to others who know picture books, but please be aware that even 5 or 6 votes from people who are just doing someone a favor can sway this vote. We would rather it reflect what the real committee is doing: voting only after considering each book very carefully. Okay. Enough lecturing. Now it’s your turn to weigh in, both in the comments below and by clicking on the ballot.


Reminder: Calling Caldecott 2015 First Ballot Titles:

  1. The Adventures of Beekle (Dan Santat)
  2. All Different Now (E. B. Lewis)
  3. Bad Bye, Good Bye (Jonathan Bean)
  4. Blizzard (John Rocco)
  5. Buried Sunlight (Molly Bang)
  6. Draw! (Raúl Colón)
  7. The Farmer and the Clown (Marla Frazee)
  8. Firefly July (Melissa Sweet)
  9. Gaston (Christian Robinson)
  10. Gravity (Jason Chin)
  11. Hug Machine (Scott Campbell)
  12. The Iridescence of Birds (Hadley Hooper)
  13. Josephine (Christian Robinson)
  14. Kid Sheriff and the Terrible Toads (Lane Smith)
  15. A Letter for Leo (Sergio Ruzzier)
  16. My Bus (Byron Barton)
  17. My Grandfather’s Coat (Barbara McClintock)
  18. Nana in the City (Lauren Castillo)
  19. Neighborhood Sharks (Katherine Roy)
  20. The Pilot and the Little Prince (Peter Sís)
  21. The Right Word (Melissa Sweet)
  22. Quest (Aaron Becker)
  23. Sam & Dave Dig a Hole (Jon Klassen)
  24. Viva Frida (Yuyi Morales)
  25. Winter Bees (Rick Allen)

 

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Lesser-known heroes http://www.hbook.com/2015/01/blogs/lollys-classroom/lesser-known-heroes/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/01/blogs/lollys-classroom/lesser-known-heroes/#respond Thu, 22 Jan 2015 11:01:53 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=43548 In my literature classroom, students must always be reading a book outside of the novel we’re reading as a class. Every now and then, a student will pull V for Vendetta or Watchmen or Maus or some other graphic novel* off of my shelf and ask if he can use it as his independent reading […]

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In my literature classroom, students must always be reading a book outside of the novel we’re reading as a class. Every now and then, a student will pull V for Vendetta or Watchmen or Maus or some other graphic novel* off of my shelf and ask if he can use it as his independent reading book. There’s always a tentativeness about the question, as if I’ll turn to him, adjust my monocle, and say, “Bah. That’s not real literature.”

So they tend to be surprised when I say, “Sure,” and leave my monocle as is.

I would hope that by now the debate about whether graphic novels are legitimate literature has fallen by the wayside. At their best, they have well-developed characters, complex narratives, and philosophical underpinnings. At their worst, they still have words that must be read, a narrative that must be unspooled.

But as appealing as they are, it can be intimidating for students — and teachers — to enter the world of comics, given the endless reiterations and reboots, or simply the vast selection of titles. With that in mind, I wanted to share a list of some of my favorites. These are stories that I believe represent the genre at its best and which I’m comfortable recommending to high school kids. And just to give you a heads up, I’m staying away from the ones that have already entered the mainstream — like V for Vendetta, Watchmen, Maus, Persepolis, Hellboy, and The Walking Dead.

SandmanBoneRunaways
Y last manInvinciblemanifest destinyUnwritten

Sandman, written by Neil Gaiman (Vertigo)
After escaping from captivity for a number of years, Dream returns to his kingdom only to find that things have fallen apart in his absence. He then sets out to restore order to the world of sleepers.

Bone, written by Jeff Smith
Three exiled cousins wander a fantasy landscape where they are pursued by giant rats and evil locusts. A strange mixture of goofiness and darkness.

Runaways, written by Brian K. Vaughan (Marvel)
A group of kids discover that their parents are super-villains. Just as they happen to do so, they begin to develop their own unique powers and abilities which they use to try to stop their parents.

Y: The Last Man, written by Brian K. Vaughn (Vertigo)
A sudden plague sweeps the earth, killing every male on the planet, except for one guy and his (literal) monkey.

Invincible, written by Robert Kirkman (Image)
In a send-up of the DC universe, the teenage son of the world’s strongest superhero discovers he has powers of his own. Of course, this complicates things. For everyone.

Manifest Destiny, written by Chris Dingess (Image)
Lewis and Clark travel west to explore the continent—and clear it of monsters. This is a fairly new series with a lot of potential.

The Unwritten, written by Mike Carey and Peter Gross (Vertigo)
The grown-up son of a missing novelist may actually be transforming into the fictional boy-wizard from his father’s popular books. Kind of. An interesting exploration into the significance of story, which blurs the lines between fiction and reality.

•    •    •

Since there’s obviously a lot more out there (and especially considering that I’m looking over my recommendations and realizing how male-centric it is…), let me know in the comments what you would add to the list.

* “Graphic novel” and “comic” are sometimes used interchangeably and sometimes not. Personally, I tend to use the former to refer to a collection of comics bound together in a trade paperback or hardcover that form a complete story arc. I use the latter to refer to a single issue, a series, or the genre.

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Shhh! Top secret box http://www.hbook.com/2015/01/blogs/out-of-the-box/shhh-top-secret-box/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/01/blogs/out-of-the-box/shhh-top-secret-box/#comments Wed, 21 Jan 2015 17:00:57 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=45703 We can’t show you what’s under the pink peanuts yet, but we CAN tell you it is an original painting by Tomie dePaola which will grace the cover of our March/April 2015 Horn Book Magazine. It’s also possibly the most carefully wrapped package I’ve ever received. We  Tomie!

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Cover art from Tomie dePaola

We can’t show you what’s under the pink peanuts yet, but we CAN tell you it is an original painting by Tomie dePaola which will grace the cover of our March/April 2015 Horn Book Magazine. It’s also possibly the most carefully wrapped package I’ve ever received.

We Tomie dePaola heart Tomie!

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Pre-voting instructions…it’s almost time! http://www.hbook.com/2015/01/blogs/calling-caldecott/pre-voting-instructions-almost-time/ http://www.hbook.com/2015/01/blogs/calling-caldecott/pre-voting-instructions-almost-time/#comments Wed, 21 Jan 2015 17:00:46 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=45608 I find it hard to believe that we’re less than two weeks from The Announcement at ALA. It was harder than you might think to put our ballot together — and it will be just as challenging for the folks on the Real Committee to narrow the field and choose the titles they want to consider. […]

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vote_tomorrow

I find it hard to believe that we’re less than two weeks from The Announcement at ALA. It was harder than you might think to put our ballot together — and it will be just as challenging for the folks on the Real Committee to narrow the field and choose the titles they want to consider. With every new Mock Caldecott announcement, I feel that same pang of anxiety I felt when I was on the committee some years ago. It usually starts with, “What are they seeing that I am not seeing?” and moves on to, “WHAT? I have not even seen that book!” Breathe in, breathe out.

Here are the 25 titles the three of us have chosen to appear on our mock Caldecott ballot:

  1. The Adventures of Beekle (Dan Santat)
  2. All Different Now (E. B. Lewis)
  3. Bad Bye, Good Bye (Jonathan Bean)
  4. Blizzard (John Rocco)
  5. Buried Sunlight (Molly Bang)
  6. Draw! (Raúl Colón)
  7. The Farmer and the Clown (Marla Frazee)
  8. Firefly July (Melissa Sweet)
  9. Gaston (Christian Robinson)
  10. Gravity (Jason Chin)
  11. Hug Machine (Scott Campbell)
  12. The Iridescence of Birds (Hadley Hooper)
  13. Josephine (Christian Robinson)
  14. Kid Sheriff and the Terrible Toads (Lane Smith)
  15. A Letter for Leo (Sergio Ruzzier)
  16. My Bus (Byron Barton)
  17. My Grandfather’s Coat (Barbara McClintock)
  18. Nana in the City (Lauren Castillo)
  19. Neighborhood Sharks (Katherine Roy)
  20. The Pilot and the Little Prince (Peter Sís)
  21. The Right Word (Melissa Sweet)
  22. Quest (Aaron Becker)
  23. Sam & Dave Dig a Hole (Jon Klassen)
  24. Viva Frida (Yuyi Morales)
  25. Winter Bees (Rick Allen)

Tomorrow (Thursday), Calling Caldecott will become MOCK Caldecott: all of you get to vote for the winners and honor books. We are going to repeat this next part tomorrow, just so everyone reads it. When it comes time to vote, please just vote for the three books you think are most deserving. Please, for the love of all I hold dear, do not send out links to your grandma, your second cousin, and all the people in your publishing house so that they can vote for your favorite book (or the book you wrote or illustrated). It’s fine (and we encourage this) to send the link to folks who love picture books and who have opinions about many of the books on the list. Just, please, let everyone decide for her- or himself. Get it?

So, take the last few hours before voting opens to take another look at your favorites. Maybe get to a library or bookstore to find the ones you have missed.

Here’s the schedule. All times listed are Eastern Standard Time.

Right now! Discussion of books on ballot
9 a.m. Thursday, January 22 Ballot 1 open for voting
9 a.m. Friday, January 23 Voting on ballot 1 ends
Noon Friday, January 23 Ballot 1 results announced on Calling Caldecott
9 a.m. Monday, January 26 Ballot 2 opens
9 a.m. Tuesday, January 27 Voting ends
Noon Tuesday, January 27 Calling Caldecott mock vote results posted

 

At this point the Real Committee is busy rereading all their nominated books, making notes on what they appreciate and what concerns them. (Experience tells me that a lot of time will given to the concerns — a person has to be ready to defend against others’ concerns and to lay out their own concerns in a way that the others can hear. Minds will have to be changed!) The real committee starts face-to-face deliberations on Friday, January 30, so they are down to the wire, just like we are here.

And here, we would love to hear your pleas for your favorite books — use the comment section below! See you when you vote tomorrow!

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