The Horn Book http://www.hbook.com Publications about books for children and young adults Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:12:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.4 Eleanor and Park http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/blogs/lollys-classroom/eleanor-park-2/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/blogs/lollys-classroom/eleanor-park-2/#respond Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:12:58 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=41930 Rainbow Rowell’s nontraditional romance novel Eleanor and Park portrays a young love that is genuine in its intimacy and awkwardness, as well as the painful realities of life that are well beyond the control of the young protagonists. What are the entry points in the story for readers whose lives are very different from those […]

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rowell eleanor park Eleanor and ParkRainbow Rowell’s nontraditional romance novel Eleanor and Park portrays a young love that is genuine in its intimacy and awkwardness, as well as the painful realities of life that are well beyond the control of the young protagonists. What are the entry points in the story for readers whose lives are very different from those of the two main characters, set in the 1980s? Why, do you think, has this book resonated so powerfully with young readers and critics alike?

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The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/blogs/lollys-classroom/absolutely-true-diary-part-time-indian/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/blogs/lollys-classroom/absolutely-true-diary-part-time-indian/#respond Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:04:32 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=41928 In The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, Sherman Alexie tells Junior’s story with a lot of humor, but pulls no punches in depicting the brutal truths of alcoholism, poverty, and bigotry both on and off the reservation. Does humor have a place in a realistic novel about tragic circumstances? If you’ve had classroom […]

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absolutely true diary The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time IndianIn The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, Sherman Alexie tells Junior’s story with a lot of humor, but pulls no punches in depicting the brutal truths of alcoholism, poverty, and bigotry both on and off the reservation. Does humor have a place in a realistic novel about tragic circumstances? If you’ve had classroom experience with this book, how have your students responded to Junior’s story?

We are also reading Alexie’s Wall Street Journal article, “Why the Best Kid’s Books are Written In Blood.” Go ahead an comment on that article here, too.

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The Thing About Luck http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/blogs/lollys-classroom/thing-luck/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/blogs/lollys-classroom/thing-luck/#respond Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:03:52 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=41933 In The Thing about Luck by Cynthia Kadohata, Summer has important duties to fulfill as the daughter and granddaughter of migrant harvest workers, and she must also meet the daily demands of her traditional Japanese grandparents. Summer’s multi-generational family and their lives as agricultural workers are facets of contemporary American culture that may be unfamiliar […]

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kadohata thingaboutluck 197x300 The Thing About LuckIn The Thing about Luck by Cynthia Kadohata, Summer has important duties to fulfill as the daughter and granddaughter of migrant harvest workers, and she must also meet the daily demands of her traditional Japanese grandparents. Summer’s multi-generational family and their lives as agricultural workers are facets of contemporary American culture that may be unfamiliar to many young readers — or adults for that matter. How does Kadohata invite all readers into Summer’s story while maintaining her family’s distinct experience and perspective? What surprised, delighted, or intrigued you most about Summer, Jaz, Obaachan, and Jiichan?

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Review of Sam & Dave Dig a Hole http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/choosing-books/review-of-the-week/review-sam-dave-dig-hole/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/choosing-books/review-of-the-week/review-sam-dave-dig-hole/#respond Mon, 20 Oct 2014 15:29:10 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=42031 Sam & Dave Dig a Hole by Mac Barnett; illus. by Jon Klassen Primary    Candlewick    40 pp. 10/14    978-0-7636-6229-5    $16.99 This adventure starts innocently enough: “On Monday Sam and Dave dug a hole.” The boys (indistinguishable save the color of their hats and Sam’s ever-present backpack) are fueled by chocolate milk, animal cookies, and a […]

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barnett samanddave Review of Sam & Dave Dig a Hole

star2 Review of Sam & Dave Dig a Hole Sam & Dave Dig a Hole
by Mac Barnett; illus. by Jon Klassen
Primary    Candlewick    40 pp.
10/14    978-0-7636-6229-5    $16.99

This adventure starts innocently enough: “On Monday Sam and Dave dug a hole.” The boys (indistinguishable save the color of their hats and Sam’s ever-present backpack) are fueled by chocolate milk, animal cookies, and a desire to find “something spectacular.” Alas, Sam and Dave unearth nothing, coming close to — but just missing — the precious gems that dot the subterranean landscape, and oblivious all the while. Eventually the chums stop for a rest, whereupon their canine companion, digging for a bone, inadvertently causes a rupture in the dirt floor underground that leaves the explorers falling “down, down, down,” only to land in what appears to be their own yard. But upon closer inspection, this house isn’t quite the same as before; a number of subtle differences go undetected by the hapless duo, but observant viewers will certainly take note. Barnett’s well-chosen words (“Sam and Dave ran out of chocolate milk. / But they kept digging. / They shared the last animal cookie. / But they kept digging”) and plentiful white space support readers. Klassen’s cross-section illustrations provide a mole’s-eye view of the underground proceedings, extending the spare text with visual humor. As in his previous books, Klassen shows an uncanny knack for conveying meaning with the subtlest of eye movements. How fitting that the wordless final spread features a knowing look between the dog and a cat familiar to Klassen fans; all that’s missing from the trippy conclusion is the theme music from The Twilight Zone. Mind-blowing in the best possible way.

From the November/December 2014 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

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It’s not on any chart / You must find it with your heart http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/blogs/read-roger/chart-must-find-heart/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/blogs/read-roger/chart-must-find-heart/#respond Mon, 20 Oct 2014 14:32:16 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=42027 Please join me on Saturday the 25th at the Boston Book Festival for “Masters of Fantasy,” a panel discussion with Soman Chainani (A World Without Princes), Holly Black and Cassandra Clare (The Iron Trial), and Gregory Maguire (Egg & Spoon). We’ll be talking about–well, I guess I should get on that right quick, as I’m […]

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345px PP MaryMartin Its not on any chart / You must find it with your heartPlease join me on Saturday the 25th at the Boston Book Festival for “Masters of Fantasy,” a panel discussion with Soman Chainani (A World Without Princes), Holly Black and Cassandra Clare (The Iron Trial), and Gregory Maguire (Egg & Spoon). We’ll be talking about–well, I guess I should get on that right quick, as I’m the moderator–but FANTASY. 1:00-2:00 PM, Emmanuel Church sanctuary, 15 Newbury Street, Boston. FREE.

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Week in Review, October 13th-17th http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/news/week-review-october-13th-17th/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/news/week-review-october-13th-17th/#respond Fri, 17 Oct 2014 22:24:08 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=42017 This week on hbook.com… Boston Globe–Horn Book Awards ceremony timeline Horn Book at Simmons Colloquium timeline BGHB/HBAS weekend slideshow Horn BOO! Recommended Halloween boooOOOoooks Reviews of the Week: Picture Book: Remy and Lulu by Kevin Hawkes; 
illus. by the author with 
miniatures by Hannah E. Harrison Fiction: 100 Sideways Miles by Andrew Smith Nonfiction: Malala, […]

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banner weekinreview 550x100 Week in Review, October 13th 17th

This week on hbook.com…

Boston Globe–Horn Book Awards ceremony timeline

Horn Book at Simmons Colloquium timeline

BGHB/HBAS weekend slideshow

Horn BOO! Recommended Halloween boooOOOoooks

Reviews of the Week:

Read Roger: Two possible explanations for all the zombie books“: Roger and Arthur Levine go head-to-head

Out of the Box:

Calling Caldecott:

Lolly’s Classroom:

Events calendar

See overviews of previous weeks by clicking the tag week in review. Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook to keep up-to-date on our articles!

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MOMA Art Lab app review http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/choosing-books/app-review-of-the-week/moma-art-lab-app-review/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/choosing-books/app-review-of-the-week/moma-art-lab-app-review/#respond Fri, 17 Oct 2014 20:17:09 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=42005 Yesterday was rainy and gray and a little grumpy around here, but my discovery of the Museum of Modern Art‘s free Art Lab app (2012) — based on their child-friendly interactive exhibits — brightened my afternoon. The first element of the app is a canvas with line, shape, and color toolbars accessible at the bottom […]

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artlab menu MOMA Art Lab app reviewYesterday was rainy and gray and a little grumpy around here, but my discovery of the Museum of Modern Art‘s free Art Lab app (2012) — based on their child-friendly interactive exhibits — brightened my afternoon.

The first element of the app is a canvas with line, shape, and color toolbars accessible at the bottom of the screen. Drag and drop, rotate, copy and paste, send forward or back, switch color, or delete your shapes and lines with the tap or swipe of a fingertip. Icons along the right side of the canvas allow you to save your work, change the canvas color, or start over. Tap on the light bulb icon on the left to get some tips and project ideas such as “Experiment with stretching, turning, shrinking, and layering shapes” or “Draw for ten seconds without lifting your finger. Color in any shapes that were created.”

Just as I was thinking this is fun, but it’d be great if there were an art history component, I tapped on the “activities” icon (also on the left) and discovered nine projects based on specific artists’ work. A brief overview of the featured artist’s style or philosophy, accompanied by a photo (and occasional video clip, where appropriate) of one of her or his iconic works, introduces each activity. Explore visualizing sound like Elizabeth Murray, make a chance collage like Jean (Hans) Arp, virtually “draw with scissors” like Henri Matisse, or create a shape poem like Brice Marden. Some of the activities are more successful than others, but overall the experience is both educational and enjoyable.

I wish I had had this app back when I was working on the Picture This–inspired picture book project for Susan Bloom’s Picture Book class. (Although that’s probably cheating.) Here are four versions of the same concept — with varying levels of dynamism based on the app’s prompts:

MoMA ArtLab artwork2 MOMA Art Lab app review

My original composition.

MoMA ArtLab artwork4 MOMA Art Lab app review

Prompt: “Experiment with stretching, turning, shrinking, and layering shapes.”

MoMA ArtLab artwork3 MOMA Art Lab app review

Prompt: “Paint over your artwork by layering different lines, shapes, and colors” like Arshile Gorky.

MoMA ArtLab artwork MOMA Art Lab app review

Prompt: “Draw with scissors” with more organic shapes á la Matisse.

A tutorial gives an overview of the app’s straightforward navigation; an info icon tells more about the museum itself; a speaker icon allows you to hear any portion of the text read aloud; and from the gallery you can save your art to your camera roll or send it to a friend — or to MOMA! (For privacy, send features must be enabled in your devices’ settings menu first.)

MOMA has several more educational apps and ebooks about the museum and its exhibits. Rock on. Stay tuned for reviews of those. Available for iPad (requires iOS 5.0 or later); free. Recommended for primary users and up.

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Dilemma, dilemma… http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/blogs/out-of-the-box/dilemma-dilemma/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/blogs/out-of-the-box/dilemma-dilemma/#respond Thu, 16 Oct 2014 18:03:56 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=41997 This week has been so busy — and we’ve posted so much great content — that it’s been terribly difficult to decide what to feature just today. See for yourself! 2014 BGHB ceremony timeline 2014 Horn Book at Simmons Colloquium timeline Five questions for Cary Elwes Raina Telgemeier: An illustrated life Horn BOO! 2014 Viva […]

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indecision Dilemma, dilemma...This week has been so busy — and we’ve posted so much great content — that it’s been terribly difficult to decide what to feature just today. See for yourself!

2014 BGHB ceremony timeline
2014 Horn Book at Simmons Colloquium timeline
Five questions for Cary Elwes
Raina Telgemeier: An illustrated life
Horn BOO! 2014
Viva Frida
Stuck on Post-Its

Come on, how are we supposed to choose? We’ll be cycling through these posts on our main page through the next few days to make sure they all get some love!

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Five questions for Cary Elwes http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/blogs/out-of-the-box/five-questions-cary-elwes/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/blogs/out-of-the-box/five-questions-cary-elwes/#comments Thu, 16 Oct 2014 16:15:43 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=41825 On Friday, October 17, 2014, at 6:00 PM, Porter Square Books is hosting (at the Brattle Theatre) David Valdes Greenwood, in conversation with Cary Elwes, author of As You Wish. A Princess Bride screening follows the talk (screening begins at 8:30 PM). We asked Mr. Farmboy himself our Five Questions, to get in the “sexy […]

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As You Wishcover Five questions for Cary ElwesOn Friday, October 17, 2014, at 6:00 PM, Porter Square Books is hosting (at the Brattle Theatre) David Valdes Greenwood, in conversation with Cary Elwes, author of As You Wish. A Princess Bride screening follows the talk (screening begins at 8:30 PM).

We asked Mr. Farmboy himself our Five Questions, to get in the “sexy fairy-tale” spirit. We will refrain from quoting lines from the movie. Though we could. All day long. (NB: Roger has never seen The Princess Bride. Inconceivable, right?!)

1. My childhood best friend and I saw The Princess Bride in the theater and we can still quote long passages from it. What from the experience still resonates most with you?

CE: The whole experience resonates with me which is why I decided to write this book, but if I had to pick one thing it would be a person and that would be Andre.

2. Princess Bride fans must stop you all the time. What are some of the weirdest, funniest, or most memorable things they say?

CE: I met a family once who named all their children after the characters in the film.

3. Have you watched the movie with someone who’s never seen it before? (The ROUS scene is fun!)

CE: I have not, but I am looking forward to sharing it with my daughter in the near future.

4. Celebrity today is not what it was in 1987. How do you think your life would be different if The Princess Bride came out in 2014?

CE: I have no idea…

5. You’ve written a book about a movie that was first a (wonderful) book. Are you a reader?

CE: Of course. I read the original book of The Princess Bride when I was thirteen and I thoroughly recommend it as a companion book to mine!

 

James Lipton, you can have your job back now. Though it’s been fun to chat with movie stars.

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2014 Horn Book at Simmons Colloquium timeline http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/news/boston-globe-horn-book-awards/2014-horn-book-simmons-colloquium-timeline/ http://www.hbook.com/2014/10/news/boston-globe-horn-book-awards/2014-horn-book-simmons-colloquium-timeline/#respond Thu, 16 Oct 2014 16:00:43 +0000 http://www.hbook.com/?p=41914 On Saturday, October 11th, we held our fourth annual Horn Book at Simmons Colloquium with the theme “Mind the Gaps: Books for All Young Readers.” Miss the fun? We’ve compiled a timeline of the day’s highlights based on tweets by our staff and other attendees. See Friday’s ceremony timeline here. 8:53 am: Good morning! Cider […]

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10 HBAS14 nelson podium 2014 Horn Book at Simmons Colloquium timeline

HBAS keynote speaker Vaunda Micheaux Nelson.

On Saturday, October 11th, we held our fourth annual Horn Book at Simmons Colloquium with the theme “Mind the Gaps: Books for All Young Readers.” Miss the fun? We’ve compiled a timeline of the day’s highlights based on tweets by our staff and other attendees. See Friday’s ceremony timeline here.

8:53 am: Good morning! Cider donut and lots of coffee: good to go for #HBAS14

9:18 am: “Mind the Gaps” theme came from London Tube and from annual @HornBook feature; today at #HBAS14 we ask, “What’s missing in #kidlit?”

9:20 am: Where are the gaps in books for children – in diversity, subjects; audiences not served; genres/types of stories not being told?

9:19 am, @libraryreeder: Exploring the gaps in children’s literature @HornBook at Simmons. What’s missing? Which readers are not being served? pic.twitter.com/geZ9Xgb1mN

9:23 am: Vaunda Micheaux Nelson giving the keynote. It’s a challenging subject; she sometimes yelled at Roger, “Why did you ask me to do this?! And why did I say yes?!”

9:26 am: Vaunda was inspired by Christopher Myers’s essay on race in #kidlit, “Young Dreamers,” and by a weeding project at her library

9:31 am: Vaunda Micheaux Nelson: “Literature is a window into the lives of others.” We learn about others’ experiences and about ourselves

9:32 am, @chidiaqian: Readers of color have to read outside their culture because there isn’t enough, but how many white teens read authors of color?

9:36 am: Bright April by Marguerite De Angeli was the first book to give young Vaunda a fully realized black character with whom she could identify

9:38 am: Vaunda: Be careful not to make assumptions about readers and their connections to literature; we all make subtle connections personal to us

9:41 am: Vaunda cried reading “Young Dreamers;” she’s choked up now talking about it. It made her ask, “What is my responsibility as a writer?”

9:41 am, @libraryreeder: Vaunda Micheaux Nelson talks about how reading a broad variety of books gives children a language to talk about the world.

9:44 am: Fictional worlds have real-life repercussions. Vaunda talking about her imaginative play with her brother, pretending to be white TV characters

9:45 am, @libraryreeder: #WeNeedDiverseBooks to ensure that all readers can find themselves and celebrate the accomplishments of all people. #mindthegaps

9:47 am: What happens to great books featuring diverse characters if they don’t circulate at libraries or get passed on by parents?

9:51 am: Vaunda: We need to get over idea that only people of a particular group can write about it. Isn’t that part of why we read, to make connections?

9:52 am: Vaunda: Part of our goal is to discover, nurture, encourage, mentor new authors and illustrators of color

9:54 am: Vaunda: There are more black experiences, stories to be told than what we currently see in #kidlit

9:55 am: What is the responsibility of publishers? How can publishers balance diversity with financial demands?

9:56 am, @libraryreeder: There’s still black history to uncover and share, but we also need contemporary and fun books with children of color -Vaunda Micheaux Nelson

9:57 am: Vaunda: How do we reach the people outside our own circle, stop preaching to the choir about diversity?

9:59 am: Vaunda worries that in current American society, “what is truly significant is not considered important.” Distracted by technology, consumerism (e.g., new iPhone)

10:00 am: How can we bring unsung good books and literacy into the mainstream media?

10:03 am: Vaunda sharing hilarious and heartwarming video clip of University of Georgia Bulldogs wide receiver Malcom Mitchell and his book club

10:05 am: Vaunda: diversity in lit situation has improved but “I believe we can do better… I am proud to be part of this great work”

10:07 am: @RogerReads: How can reviewers help? What do you look for in reviews when purchasing for library?

10:10am, @malindalo: Say things like: “African American teen Jane is fighting for her life in this Hunger Games knockoff.”

10:12 am: Reviewers, please give info about diverse characters — with limited funds, Vaunda chooses diverse books over non-diverse books of comparable quality

10:16 am: Award committee judge Nina Lindsay asking why “blockbuster books” like Harry Potter and The Hunger Games series are still white

10:25 am: Nina Lindsay moderating “Filling in the Gaps” panel with winning illustrators @itspeterbrown, Christian Robinson, and @geneluenyang

10:29 am: @itspeterbrown talking about experimentation, exploration in his art. “Still in process of figuring out what my art really looks like”

10:30 am: Nina: How do exploration, drama/theater, and play figure into Christian’s work?

10:31am, @snicketlass23: Christian Robinson says each book he works on is like putting on a different role

10:33 am, @amyjeankane: Nina Lindsay talks about the exclusion of graphic novels from children’s book awards

10:35 am: @geneluenyang giving his “cockamamie” (a.k.a. brilliant!) theories about the traditional Western separation of words and image

10:35 am, @snicketlass23: @geneluenyang throws out some theories: perhaps separation of words and pictures stems from the Protestant Reformation?

10:39 am: Nina: There are homages to ’50s/’60s in all of these illustrators’ art. Is this “between you and the art?” Or between illustrator and reader?

10:41 am: @itspeterbrown: Artists have always looked back, mimicked those who came before. Internet gives us a bird’s eye view on art history

10:44 am: @geneluenyang: We draw from earlier artists and combine elements in new ways. The very new is hard to communicate to others and have it understood

10:42 am, @chidiaqian: “As a culture we’ve given words meaning over time, and when you write you draw on those meanings.” -@geneluenyang

10:42 am, @amyjeankane: Gene Luen Yang @geneluenyang speaking on taking images from the past and combining them with new things pic.twitter.com/xS6hww7S9t

10:45 am: Nina is pulling no punches: “You are all men… Why do you think more male illustrators win awards?”

10:47 am: @geneluenyang: “I don’t know why that’s happening but I’ll happily give you a stack of books by women illustrators to consider for next year”

10:56 am, @chidiaqian: Christian Robinson: How to tell story of Josephine Baker’s adult life to children appropriately? Think of them as people with emotions.

10:57 am: Christian Robinson: “I’m telling a story to people with emotions & the best way to do that is through emotion, through color”

10:58 am, @cle0niki: “I think I fit really well in #YA…I have a natural prudishness that keeps me away from adult stories” -@geneluenyang #HBAS14

11:04 am: Judge Amy Pattee talking with Fiction Award winner Andrew Smith @marburyjack and his editor Julie Strauss-Gabel

11:09 am: Andrew @marburyjack was called out in one of those “dark YA” pieces. Was hurt but realized the world is dark and harming children — not literature

11:09am, @amyjeankane: “What are you talking about, writers harming children? The world is harming children” -Andrew Smith

11:10 am: Andrew @marburyjack originally conceived of Grasshopper Jungle as a graphic novel!

11:12 am: Editor Julie Strauss-Gabel @jsgabel‘s reaction when reading Grasshopper Jungle manuscript was two words: “HOLY SHIT.” Editors need to have that visceral reaction when acquiring novels

11:14 am: Andrew @marburyjack: “I consider commas to be little turds dropped by Satan”

11:16 am: Julie @jsgabel: there aren’t really delightful deleted scenes when editing a novel; everything that gets cut needs to go

11:22 am: Julie @jsgabel: the challenge in writing and publishing is to know what you want to put out there, know your audience, and be brave regardless of trends

11:25 am: Julie @jsgabel: “Stop trying to write or publish books for everybody. Stop trying to catch everybody in one bucket. Stick to your guns.”

11:26 am, @planetalvina: “We’re in a long-term business, and we stay the course,” -@jsgabel re: YA and not publishing to trends, staying true to passions.

11:27 am, @libraryreeder: Andrew Smith distinguishes between audience and readership. His audience is one — himself. Luckily his readers like what he likes.

11:28 am: Julie @jsgabel: “A reader makes a book complete.” But that starts small, with writer, agent, editor; gradually expands to wider audience

11:29 am: Julie @jsgabel: during teenage years, “it’s a violent act to figure out who you are.” YA books can help that process

11:37 am: Vaunda asking Andrew @marburyjack about teens’ versus adult responses to Grasshopper Jungle‘s language, sexual topics

11:40 am: Andrew @marburyjack: Words like ugly, fat, stupid, loser more harmful than “four-letter words”

11:41 am: Andrew @marburyjack: Adolescence is very much like the end of the world. Figuring out who you are is cataclysmic

11:47 am: Andrew @marburyjack: The gap of representations of sex and sexuality in YA is starting to close

1:09 pm: @SteveSheinkin on “finding the stories”

1:11 pm: @SteveSheinkin: A gap in publishing for kids is narrative nonfiction — not enough of it

1:13 pm: @SteveSheinkin: There’s never been a gap to me between engaging storytelling in fiction and in nonfiction

1:14 pm: As a kid @SteveSheinkin would have said he didn’t like history…but favorite books were historical fiction

1:17 pm: @SteveSheinkin made a movie called “A More Perfect Union” with his brother their friends in his early 20s — watch the trailer on YouTube icon smile 2014 Horn Book at Simmons Colloquium timeline

1:18pm, @cle0niki: @SteveSheinkin tried to write a comic about two rabbis in the Wild West. #gold

1:19 pm, @chidiaqian: @cle0niki And then he published it!

1:20 pm: As a textbook writer, @SteveSheinkin wanted to include fascinating details, e.g. buttermilk making a female soldier’s fake mustache fall off (but that didn’t go over so well)

1:21 pm: @SteveSheinkin recommends @scottmccloud‘s Making Comics for storytellers in all genres and formats

1:22 pm, @amyjeankane: Steve Sheinkin talking about the ways nonfiction can be structured like a screenplay — “There is no gap”

1:24 pm: @SteveSheinkin: “You know who gives great writing advice? Tim Gunn.” #ProjectRunway

1:25 pm, @cle0niki: @SteveSheinkin takes writing advice from @TimGunn: “You already have a wow factor, you don’t need another”

1:27 pm: @SteveSheinkin on The Notorious Benedict Arnold cover: “Does that look like health food?” No, it’s pure action/adventure

1:29 pm: @SteveSheinkin learns writing technique from suspense novels, screenwriting… He storyboards scenes based on the historical timeline

1:30 pm, @chidiaqian: “That’s a hard idea to accept as a writer: that you can cut out something good and what’s left is made better.” -@SteveSheinkin

1:31 pm: Attendee: How can narrative nonfiction bridge the gap between textbooks and young readers?

1:32 pm: @SteveSheinkin: Why do we make kids read boring books when adults don’t want to read boring books either?

1:33 pm, @librarilana: “When you present something as a story, it’s actually easier to remember than if it’s presented as information.” -@SteveSheinkin

1:38 pm: @SteveSheinkin: Make narrative nonfiction look more like “real books” for pleasure reading, not “learning books,” with fiction-looking trim size, cover

1:43 pm, @amyjeankane: @SteveSheinkin plays a recording of Nixon inviting Reagan to play golf. I love the #HBAS14

1:48pm: @SLHardeson is getting the inside scoop on @SteveSheinkin‘s post-it note system

1:51 pm: Judge Claire Gross moderating panel on nonfiction with honorees Steve Jenkins and Patricia Hruby Powell @rootatootoot

1:53 pm: As a librarian, Claire envisions “gaps” in #kidlit publishing as physical gaps on the shelf. Where do Steve and Patricia see their books situated? What gaps do they fill?

1:55 pm: Patricia @rootatootoot: Josephine “is a book that’s a dance”

2:00 pm: Patricia @rootatootoot: Josephine is all about rhythm. The rhythm, the melody had to remain, still had to work when the longer, YA manuscript was reimagined as a picture book

2:02 pm: Patricia @rootatootoot giving demo of Charleston in time to opening lines of Josephine… What a treat!

2:10 pm: Nina: What differentiates “sanitizing” from “simplifying” when writing nonfiction for young people?

2:13 pm: Steve Jenkins: The “rules” or expectations of nonfiction about animals are like a PG-13 rating: violence is perceived as ok, sex is not

2:13 pm, @geneluenyang: With Christine Heppermann @cmheppermann at @HornBook at Simmons! pic.twitter.com/2JPdzzPYLD

2:14 pm: Claire: Both Josephine and The Animal Book are aspirational, inspirational — they invite readers to find out more about their subjects

2:17 pm: Steve’s graphic design background, contrast, scale, other tools of “designer’s toolkit” applicable to his work in cut paper medium

2:21 pm: Patricia @rootatootoot had a say in the design, layout of text for Josephine. She wanted the text to suit the movement of the story and of Christian Robinson’s illustrations

2:31 pm, @NSWDWMom: Sweet treats! pic.twitter.com/K9bZyHI0oO

2:37 pm, Andrew @marburyjack: An inspiring and beautiful woman, Vaunda Micheaux Nelson. pic.twitter.com/HpDmalunWg

2:38 pm: @RogerReads moderating panel with Arthur Levine of @AALBooks, Jason Low of @LEEandLOW, and Ginee Seo of @ChronicleKids

2:42 pm, @chidiaqian: @RogerReads on babies of the ’80s and publishing age-level trends: “These kids, as they grew up, created great moments in publishing”

2:43 pm: @AALBooks published #HarryPotter books partly in response to gaps he saw around international books, fantasy

2:46 pm, @chidiaqian: “It’s talent that bridges the gap and talent that shows us where the gaps are.” -Ginee Seo

2:48 pm: Not much has changed re: diversity in books. See Walter Dean Myers’s NYT editorial from the ’80s and most recent one

2:53 pm, @chidiaqian: Publishers’ discussion at #HBAS14: why aren’t libraries buying as many books today as they did in the past?

2:57 pm: At ALA Las Vegas, someone asked Ginee if she would be gambling. Her response: “I gamble on the books”

2:59 pm: Publishers’ panel echoing Julie Strauss-Gabel’s need for visceral reaction; need to have that moment when you HAVE to publish a book

3:00 pm: Arthur @AALBooks: Publishing is an evangelist business

3:06 pm: @LEEandLOW makes conscious decision to increase percentages of staff members of color, authors and illustrators of color

3:11 pm: Jason has gotten responses to @LEEandLOW‘s stats on diversity that say, “I’ve never thought about this before but now I understand. And it sucks”

3:12 pm: The stats are important. Hiring diverse staff, publishing diverse authors and illustrators are important

3:14 pm: @RogerReads: How do we create a reading culture in which everybody reads about everybody?

3:19 pm: Arthur @AALBooks: We need to watch our words. How we recommend books is meaningful. Why do we mention race or the fact a book is an import first?

3:32pm, @chidiaqian: Nina Lindsay points out that budgets didn’t expand for buying double of same title: e and print. And another attendee points out the budget going to leveled readers.

3:35 pm: Attendee: Requiring devices to read is an equity issue. E-books highlight class-based access gaps, libraries try to provide that access

3:40 pm: Cathie Mercier of @SimmonsCollege giving closing remarks. How does she always manage to sum up the day so elegantly?

3:42 pm: Cathie: Today we’ve looked at the gaps, “the absences that haunt our pages” in the field of #kidlit

3:45 pm: Cathie: How do we learn to do what critic Lissa Paul calls “reading otherways”? How do we move from being troubled by the gaps to action?

3:48 pm: Cathie: Evasion of diversity issues has created a coded language in which pretending not to notice difference is considered graceful and liberal

3:50 pm: Can we accept the challenge to change the current “literary landscape”? How can we publicize the quieter books that will make a difference?

4:03 pm: We create change by publishing, reading, recommending one great book at a time…but we can’t wait forever to get where we want to go

4:05 pm: Another great #HBAS14! Off to grab some Simmons and Horn Book M&Ms. See you next year!

6:05 pm, @gcpinder: Fantastic, enlightening, and inspiring discussions all day long pic.twitter.com/tuZm5qqRcG

6:23 pm, @librarilana: Thanks for another great colloquium, @HornBook! Lots to think about, even more to read.

 

More on the Boston Globe–Horn Book Awards and the following day’s Horn Book at Simmons Colloquium, “Mind the Gaps: Books for All Young Readers,” is coming soon! Follow us on Twitter for updates on all things Horn Book.

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