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Review of Eyes of the World: Robert Capa, Gerda Taro, and the Invention of Modern Photojournalism

Eyes of the World: Robert Capa, Gerda Taro, and the Invention of Modern Photojournalism by Marc Aronson and Marina Budhos High School    Holt    294 pp. 3/17    978-0-8050-9835-8    $22.99 e-book ed.  978-1-2501-0967-5    $10.99 This passionate, sprawling, multilayered biography begins like a Robert Capa photograph: right in the middle of the action. […]

Review of Keith Haring: The Boy Who Just Kept Drawing

Keith Haring: The Boy Who Just Kept Drawing by Kay A. Haring; illus. by Robert Neubecker Primary    Dial    40 pp. 2/17    978-0-525-42819-0    $16.99    g As an upbeat narrative chronicles pop artist Haring’s childhood, early adulthood, and brief but momentous career, our subject faces relentless questions from onlookers confused by his […]

Review of Vincent and Theo: The Van Gogh Brothers

Vincent and Theo: The Van Gogh Brothers by Deborah Heiligman High School    Holt    451 pp. 4/17    978-0-8050-9339-1    $19.99    g e-book ed.  978-1-2501-0969-9    $9.99 Heiligman (Charles and Emma, rev. 1/09) again examines the impact of a family member on her main subject, this time unpacking the friendship between artist Vincent […]

Women in the visual arts

We’re commemorating Women’s History Month in typical Horn Book fashion — by highlighting great books! Last week we recommended books about groundbreaking women in STEM; here are some recent picture-book biographies (plus one memoir and one tribute anthology) of innovative female visual artists. Today brought some good news regarding women and art: it’s just been […]

Collective biographies

Esbaum, Jill  Little Kids First Big Book of Who Gr. K–3    128 pp.    National Geographic First Big Books series. This colorful, oversize book features concise but engaging bios of some of the world’s most well-known artists, inventors, scientists, explorers, and human-rights leaders. Information about each individual is presented in accessible language geared at young readers, […]

Review of Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science: The First Computer Programmer

Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science: The First Computer Programmer by Diane Stanley; 
illus. by Jessie Hartland Primary    Wiseman/Simon    40 pp. 10/16    978-1-4814-5249-6    $17.99 e-book ed.  978-1-4814-5250-2    $10.99 Stanley emphasizes Ada Lovelace’s right- and left-brain pedigree (her father, whom she never knew, was the poet Lord Byron; her mother, a scientist and mathematician) beginning with the […]

Review of Ada’s Ideas: The Story of Ada Lovelace, the World’s First Computer Programmer

Ada’s Ideas: The Story of Ada Lovelace, the World’s First Computer Programmer by Fiona Robinson; 
illus. by the author Primary    Abrams    40 pp. 8/16    978-1-4197-1872-4    $17.95 e-book ed.  978-1-61312-913-5    $15.54 Whisked away as a newborn by Anne Milbanke, her strait-laced mathematician mother, Ada Lovelace (1815–1852) never knew her father, the impetuous Romantic poet Lord Byron. […]

Making a Difference, Week 5 / Black History Month, Week 1

Throughout January, we celebrated people who have Made a Difference through their good work. Each day, we recommended a book or article about someone who has effected positive change. This week’s picks: Out of the Box post Look to the lunchroom by librarian Danielle Winter Field Notes: “Loud in the Library: Creating Social Activists at […]

Making a Difference, Week 4

This month we’re celebrating people who have Made a Difference through their good work. Each day, we’ll highlight a book about someone who has effected positive change, with a roundup on Fridays. Follow the hashtag #HBMaDJan17 @HornBook and Facebook.com/TheHornBook. This week’s picks: a roundup of Youth Media Awards’ many examples of those Making a Difference […]

Review of Sachiko: A Nagasaki Bomb Survivor’s Story

Sachiko: A Nagasaki Bomb Survivor’s Story by Caren Stelson Middle School, High School    Carolrhoda    144 pp. 10/16    978-1-4677-8903-5    $19.99 e-book ed.  978-1-5124-1884-2    $9.99 The result of extensive interviews with Nagasaki atomic bomb survivor Sachiko Yasui, Stelson’s sensitively crafted account spans fifty years of Yasui’s life, starting in August 1945 when the bomb was dropped (she […]