>More Meta

>In Betsy Bird’s SLJ article “This Blog’s for You” (and I thank her for including Read Roger in the list of “Ten Blogs You Can’t Live Without”), she asks a bunch of swell questions: Do kids’ lit bloggers influence publishing decisions? Are library systems basing their purchasing decisions on our recommendations? Should they? And to […]

>Let’s not forget that the gal had a good point, but

>The discussion/flamewar over at Betsy’s place about the Amazon Vine program reminds me yet again of the best way to get people to leave comments on a blog post: write something about blogging that implies in even the tiniest way that some practices might be better than others. People love to go all meta on […]

>WWMMD?

>That is, What Would Miss Manners Do upon receipt of a blog tour “invitation” that opened “Pick a date in the month of November that you’d like to host us.” Hmm, let’s see. “Gentle Reader: While Miss Manners was pleased to be in your thoughts she thinks you have your roles mixed up. It is […]

>When writers attack!

>I wonder what you call the Twitter equivalent to drunk dialing? And if you’re going to whine about how you used to be reviewed (and how that must hurt) by Anne Tyler, it might be politic to spell her name right. [Update 11:45 AM. It looks like Alice Hoffman wisely thought to retreat from the […]

Publishers and bloggers

  In a comment on a recent thread, Elizabeth posted a comment that I thought deserved its own discussion so I moved it here for your consideration: Re. the question of anonymous posting, I seem to be the only person who holds the opinion that I would prefer to see people use their names, yet […]

>Blogs and buzz

>Here and elsewhere, there have been some valuable discussions about children’s book reviewing on blogs and an email I just got has me wondering about the distinction between book reviewing and book buzz. The email, of the multiple-recipients variety, was from Penguin: “Have you read FIRE yet? We want to know what you think! Please […]

>"The fanboys can be merciless."

>This Times article about the gypsies invading the castle of professional film criticism has a lot of import to the kidlitosphere as well, as amateur (I use the word in a strict sense) and independent critics join the established professional players in reviewing new books for children. I like what A. O. Scott has to […]

>Blurring boundaries

>Kelly Herold (of Big A, Little a) has a new blog with a very promising premise. Crossover “focuses on a rare breed of book–the adult book teens love, the teen book adults appreciate, and (very, very occasionally) that Middle Grade book adults read. I’m interested in reviewing books that transcend these age boundaries and understanding […]

>X hits the spot

>Reviewer X has a good discussion going on blog reviewing. I confess I’m dying to try Twitter if only to see just WHO is: comparing their “hit lists” for authors they plan to ask for ARCs, trading e-mail addresses and results, complaining about whether they’re getting an ARC, and actually encouraging each other to send […]

>Amazoning Out

>JasonB’s post at Galleycat about Thomas Nelson’s new program of supplying free books to bloggers on the condition that they review the book and copy said review to an online vendor such as Amazon.com brings up lots of questions, and don’t miss the link to the Guardian’s essay on the subject, which includes an entertaining, […]