>How Green Are Its Pocketses

>PW’s Rick Simonson has some uncomfortable questions for Chelsea Green, the publisher who is wrapping itself in virtue and giving Amazon first dibs on its new Obama book at the same time. Fuse #8 has been hosting a serendipitous discussion on the propensity of book blogs to link to you-know who. I’m so old I […]

>Double-dipping

>It’s not just George. Opera Chic led me to Gramophone‘s (my second-favorite magazine in the world) plan to sell CDs and downloads on their site. Gramophone is primarily in the business of reviewing classical music CDs; if they (to employ the British usage!) are also selling them, it raises the question of editorial independence–presumably, a […]

>Tugging on the leash

>Unless there’s an abandoned chicken bone at stake, Buster has never been one for much straining at the leash. But where he used to not mind being thus tethered, I’m finding that he, at sixteen or so (we’ll never know for sure), seems to welcome the security. He now blinks and stumbles in the morning […]

>It’s not a word to throw around lightly

>Poets are supposed to choose their words very carefully. This one doesn’t. But a poet standing up to a bookstore does demonstrate chutzpah, I’ll give her that. Thanks to Shelf Awareness for the link.

>"The Harry Potter Look"

>The post about judging people–I mean, getting to know people–by the books they read on the subway and keep upon their shelves sent me back to the books-by-the-foot mavens, who this month are offering a special for would-be wizards.

>The E.B. White Readaloud Award

>has been announced today by the Association of Booksellers for Children: for picture books, the winner is When Dinosaurs Came with Everything by Elise Broach and David Small (Simon & Schuster) and for older readers, The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart (Little, Brown). Congrats to all. I would personally like to give a […]

>Code Pink

>Scanning the multitudes of new books throughout the office, I am struck–again–by the endurance of pink covers on light teen girl fiction. I know this is nothing new; what interests me is the fact that I wrote about this four years ago, and I’m surprised it still works–not the chicklit formula, which is eternal, but […]

>Some people still wear a hat.

>Former Horn Book editor Anita Silvey received the Education Publishing Association‘s Ludington Award “for an individual who has made a significant contribution to the paperback book business.” Her confrerees at the award banquet sported the singular Silvey accessory in her honor: (Anita is second from the left.) Let us join in the salute. Congrats, A.S.! […]

>Chickens and Eggs

>Galleycat’s post re the First Book project reminds me of the argument advanced by Freakonomics that while the presence of lots of books in the home correlates with children being proficient readers, such literary wealth does not cause that proficiency, it simply means that reading parents tend to have reading children. That bio-determinated thought also […]

>What’s the difference between confidence and fluency?

>Commenter Zolah passed along this story about a proposed scheme in the U.K. to label children’s books by “reading age.” Let’s hope the Brits don’t try to bring this one into Boston Harbor. The organizers claim that children will not be put off by having their books belly-branded with “early, “developing,” “confident,” or “fluent,” but […]