>Fingers first

>I really tried to work it with Miles and the iPad: Ehh, thinks Miles, but now his mother really, really wants one. But, at not-quite-two, he did not seem to understand that touching various spots on the glass would make different things happen. He did go after the one non-virtual button on the iPad with […]

>Grandchildren are important

>if only for the way that, posed correctly, they can take thirty pounds off a guy. photo by Richard Asch

>And THEN I’ll stick FORKS in my eyes.

>I’m over at li’l sis’s place today, declaring my love for Big Nate.

>And no pink sneakers for you, young man

>Oprah’s pal Dr. Phil offers advice to a mother whose five-year-old son likes girls’ clothes and Barbies: “This is not a precursor to your son being gay,” explains Dr. Phil. He’ll know that in time, but this is not an indication of his sexual orientation. Dr. Phil tells Robby that she has a job to […]

>Toddler talk

>Our Kitty and her son Jakob found themselves on Salley Mavor’s blog this week. Jakob of the Ducks

>One for the boys

>Peter asks a really good question about the William C. Morris Award for first-time YA writers. I hadn’t realized that fourteen of the fifteen shortlisted finalists thus far have been women. Given the buzz around  (and the merit of) Charles Benoit’s You, I was expecting to see that there. [Edited to read: until I discovered […]

>Book plot #2

>I offer this one to Andrew Clements. Or the next Andrew Clements. The protagonist would be this guy‘s grandson. Ron Koertge can have it, if you make it this guy’s only grandson, and he’s blind.

>With the movie starring the next Shia LaBeouf?

>This whole iPhone leak story sounds like a YA novel. The boy (probably pudgy) lives with his mysteriously unreachable single dad, who runs a bar (this will allow for lots of wisdom from the grizzled regulars). Our computer nerd antihero is completely uncool–until the day he finds a too-cool-to-be-true device made by the most powerful […]

>More about boys

>The Awl is where all the good Gawker writers went, and their look at tween reading is worth your time.

>A book that begs for flashlight reading

>Serendipitous with my enjoyment of M. T. Anderson’s refereeing of Charles and Emma v. The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate, I had the best time last week reading the equally Darwinian-themed The Lost World by Arthur Conan Doyle, published in 1912. Somehow I had always missed this novel (and its subsequent movie spinoffs), but my ten-year-old […]