>One for the boys

>Peter asks a really good question about the William C. Morris Award for first-time YA writers. I hadn’t realized that fourteen of the fifteen shortlisted finalists thus far have been women. Given the buzz around  (and the merit of) Charles Benoit’s You, I was expecting to see that there. [Edited to read: until I discovered […]

>Book plot #2

>I offer this one to Andrew Clements. Or the next Andrew Clements. The protagonist would be this guy‘s grandson. Ron Koertge can have it, if you make it this guy’s only grandson, and he’s blind.

>With the movie starring the next Shia LaBeouf?

>This whole iPhone leak story sounds like a YA novel. The boy (probably pudgy) lives with his mysteriously unreachable single dad, who runs a bar (this will allow for lots of wisdom from the grizzled regulars). Our computer nerd antihero is completely uncool–until the day he finds a too-cool-to-be-true device made by the most powerful […]

>More about boys

>The Awl is where all the good Gawker writers went, and their look at tween reading is worth your time.

>A book that begs for flashlight reading

>Serendipitous with my enjoyment of M. T. Anderson’s refereeing of Charles and Emma v. The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate, I had the best time last week reading the equally Darwinian-themed The Lost World by Arthur Conan Doyle, published in 1912. Somehow I had always missed this novel (and its subsequent movie spinoffs), but my ten-year-old […]

>Wimpy Kid

>Claire reviews the movie.

>Infer this.

>Magazine reviewer Jonathan Hunt offers his picks for the five best YA works of fiction this year over at NPR. I will nitpick that one of the choices is not fiction and another not YA but all five are good books. Three of them appear on our Fanfare list, which will be whizzing its way […]

>Lions are . . .

>The New York Times Best Illustrated Books list is out, along with my review of The Lion & the Mouse. What a great book–I wish they had given me twice the space. When I sat down with it and my two young neighbors, the two year old boy announced, looking uncertainly at the cover, “lions […]

>Paging the Ambassador . . .

>The most interesting statistic of this teen reading survey concerns who responded to it: “while we purposely marketed the survey to attract male readers, females are the vast majority (96%) of responders.” It would be really good to know if book reading breaks down in similarly dramatic proportions. We know that girls and women read […]

>Can we grow the number of readers?

>Zetta Elliott makes some great points re people of color in books and as authors. Without in any way diminishing the very real problem of the white worldview of children’s book publishing, I am struck by how often and widely charges of non-representation (“why aren’t there more _____ in children’s books?” “where are the books […]