>Why isn’t there a license to bear children?

>Dan Gutman’s analysis of a not-a-fan letter reminds me of the odd irony that non-readers ascribe to books a degree of power that actual readers can only wish books had. (On a related note, one of our reviewers let us know that “ugly” is now a no-no word. That’s stupid. See what I did?)

>What these two things have in common is Stephenie Meyer

>The Atlantic would like to see more book banning. Their argument makes me recall a discussion with a friend who was living in Mexico during a particularly repressive time–she said something like “well, sure, if you say the wrong thing too loudly you risk getting arrested, but in the States you can yell your head […]

>Old home week

>Didn’t kiss no pigs but did have a glorious drive down (up? up and down?) Sunset Blvd. from the Getty Museum to the heart of Hollywood. (Unfortunately, the only stars we saw were of the reality-show stripe, Bruce and Kris Jenner, sitting in the booth next to ours at Beso, the restaurant managed by son […]

>I’m gonna see the folks I dig, I’ll even . . .

>. . . oops, don’t want to have to make like Sylvester and use my magic pebble to hide from the boys in blue. But I am going to California next week and will be giving two presentations to which you are all invited. Both are free. The first is on Thursday, February 18th, where […]

>Not quite the Myracle it seems

>While Scholastic has gotten a lot of press these last couple of weeks about censoring its book club selections, this is not new; the company has been cleaning up its club editions ever since dirty words started appearing in children’s books. Six Boxes of Books has the best analysis of the controversy I’ve seen yet. […]

>September October Horn Book Magazine

>The September/October special issue is out. Trouble is its theme and we’ve posted a few of its articles, including Betsy Hearne’s topic-setting “Nobody Knows . . .” on the website. Take a look.

>Judging a Book By Its Title

>I wonder if the legendary Making It With Mademoiselle (a crafts book from that magazine) will be joined by Janet Evanovich’s latest in the annals of books banned by mistake.

>Presto, change-o

>Collecting Children’s Books has had a couple of interesting posts about books such as They Were Strong and Good and The Rooster Crows, which have been bowdlerized to reflect changing standards of “appropriateness” in regard to depictions of nonwhite characters. Those are two among several if not many; Mary Poppins, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory […]

>Put It Where You Want It

>Debra Lau Whelan’s SLJ article on where librarians are shelving The Graveyard Book is classic shit-stirring. The article’s lead asks a question (“Where does the book belong—in the children’s area or in the teen section?”) and then goes on to give selective anecdotal evidence to conclude that any decision to put the book in YA […]

Cuba Libro Prohibito

Vamos a Cuba is back in the news. I’m glad that the Dade County schools are in such great shape that people can expend their energy on this.