>What, you mean we’re not all pretty?

>Head over to the Tea Cozy for a good discussion of gender and book-blogging.

>More about boys

>The Awl is where all the good Gawker writers went, and their look at tween reading is worth your time.

>"Now we had both done what we both swore we’d never do."

>Simon & Schuster has reissued V. C. Andrews’ notorious Flowers in the Attic and Petals on the Wind in an omnibus edition that screams “if you liked Twilight . . .” But oh how it brings me back. I began my career as a library journalist with Flowers in the Attic. SLJ editor Lillian Gerhardt […]

>Jacob’s Java?

>This past Sunday, Debbie Reese’s blog featured her friend and colleague Jean Mendoza’s trip to Forks and La Push. With photos! The one thing I like about those books is the weather; Jean Reports that no Cullens were seen on her trip, probably due to the abundant sunshine.

>Paging the Ambassador . . .

>The most interesting statistic of this teen reading survey concerns who responded to it: “while we purposely marketed the survey to attract male readers, females are the vast majority (96%) of responders.” It would be really good to know if book reading breaks down in similarly dramatic proportions. We know that girls and women read […]

>Can we grow the number of readers?

>Zetta Elliott makes some great points re people of color in books and as authors. Without in any way diminishing the very real problem of the white worldview of children’s book publishing, I am struck by how often and widely charges of non-representation (“why aren’t there more _____ in children’s books?” “where are the books […]

>I’ll Be Seeing You . . .

>Last Friday we had a very entertaining time of proofreading the Guide, aided by candy and fave tunes from the 80s provided by Miss Touch-Me Pod, whose little speaker recalls the halcyon days of AM transistor radios. There was an ongoing war, too, over the merits of The Time Traveler’s Wife, loved by Elissa and […]

>Blast from the Past

>Jen Robinson alerted me to the Amelia Elizabeth Walden Award for YA fiction, new to ALAN/NCTE but not to me. Years ago, Walden offered this award to YALSA, which turned it down because of her insistence that the winning book demonstrate “a positive approach to life.” We (I was on the board then) didn’t want […]

>More weeding wisdom

>From Work with Children in Public Libraries by Effie L. Power (ALA, 1943): “Nationality and race influence mode and type of reading and therefore library selection. Jewish boys and girls are inclined to read serious books on mature subjects, and Italian children who live most naturally out-of-doors under sunny skies read reluctantly but enjoy picture […]

>But tell Carole King to get out out out of my head

>I’m pleased to announce that Laurie Halse Anderson has won the 2009 Scott O’Dell Award for Historical Fiction for her novel Chains, published by Simon & Schuster. Congrats, Laurie!