>More weeding wisdom

>From Work with Children in Public Libraries by Effie L. Power (ALA, 1943): “Nationality and race influence mode and type of reading and therefore library selection. Jewish boys and girls are inclined to read serious books on mature subjects, and Italian children who live most naturally out-of-doors under sunny skies read reluctantly but enjoy picture […]

>But tell Carole King to get out out out of my head

>I’m pleased to announce that Laurie Halse Anderson has won the 2009 Scott O’Dell Award for Historical Fiction for her novel Chains, published by Simon & Schuster. Congrats, Laurie!

>Sitting at the grownups table

>Over at Nonfiction Matters, Marc Aronson cautions us to think about the larger context in which debates about social responsibility and the Newbery take place: “What I’d like is a set of comments on the Newbery that is not drawn from a survey of four winners, or the latest demographic chart, but a wider sense […]

>Something to whet your appetites

>Claire reviews the movie Twilight.

>Read and Grow Thin

>The New York Times is reporting that reading a novel about weight loss can help you lose weight. I’d love to believe this. But don’t.

>"Well, here’s one thing in the mail that is not a bill."

>Said Beverly Cleary in her Newbery acceptance speech, quoting from a letter written to her by a young reader. Cleary went on to bemoan the cookie-cutter class-assignment letters she received by the thousands, and who can blame her? But who can top her? Lisi Harrison (The Clique), that’s who, caught by Chasing Ray in a […]

>Princess Delite

>”Speed straight to the happy ending, without stopping to think about the story along the way.” Boston Globe critic Joanna Weiss has a great piece on the contemporary commodification of fairy tales.

>From the people who brought you . . .

>As Peter observed in another context last Sunday, so many people have Ursula Nordstrom spinning in her grave that it must be like a blender in there. This won’t help.

>Breaking Dawn Breakdown

>Gail Gauthier is interesting on the new Stephenie Meyer (which I haven’t read yet as I am only halfway through New Moon).

For the Lovers and the Fighters

Claire Gross has a new book list up about war, and Alicia Potter reviews The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants 2.