>Blogging Bolognese

>Just typing that, I’m hungry. I know things have been quiet ’round here; we’re in the middle of our remodeling/move and my mind is perpetually elsewhere. But I have been keeping with with the Bologna Book Fair via Craig Virden’s excellent posts over at PW; do take a look. And our faithful friend Elizabeth is […]

>March/April 2009 Horn Book Magazine

>The Horn Book has a snow day today but our latest issue is out and, partly, up. We’ve posted an intelligently bristling argument from Farah Mendlesohn what’s wrong with contemporary YA SF as well as veteran Joanna Rudge Long’s thoughts on what to look for in a “Three Little Pigs.” The print Magazine also includes […]

>Maybe it’s all the Ayn Rand I read in high school

>but I find these landscapes immensely comforting. They remind me of a night drive Anne Quirk and I had back from Galveston to Houston, through some fairyland of lights and probably toxic gases.

>Who Can Win What?

>Esme Codell takes Marc Aronson‘s part in this perpetual debate. One historical point–Esme cites Ouida Sebestyen’s Words By Heart as one book that “makes an outstandingly inspirational and educational contribution to an African-American audience and to everyone else as well,” thus making the Coretta Scott King Awards suffer for its ineligibility. But I remember the […]

>I can’t quite put my finger on it.

>PW has announced its (casually) bookseller-chosen Cuffie Awards, with Mem Fox and Helen Oxenbury’s Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes as the picture book pick. It is a big favorite here, too, getting a starred review and a spot on our Fanfare 2009 list. Every parent I know loves it, and the text and […]

>Sitting at the grownups table

>Over at Nonfiction Matters, Marc Aronson cautions us to think about the larger context in which debates about social responsibility and the Newbery take place: “What I’d like is a set of comments on the Newbery that is not drawn from a survey of four winners, or the latest demographic chart, but a wider sense […]

>Demography and the Newbery

>Here’s a link to that Bloomberg article we were discussing in yesterday’s post.

>Dasher, Dancer, Dunder and Jesus

>More Christmas sadness–”Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer” got temporarily yanked for its “religious overtones.” (That must be the Mongolian throat-singing version.)

>Dutch Courage?

>I mentioned over on Facebook showing one of my favorite Christmas movies, The Snowman, based on Raymond Briggs’s book, to the little Dutch kids from downstairs. One is two and the other four and they both seem to enjoy the film (or maybe it’s just that hypno-glaze the Snowman himself demonstrates when he watches TV […]

>Think Pink!

>Mitali Perkins Facebooked and Twittered a question to her friends: “should an author describe the race of a character or leave it to the reader’s imagination?” Good question, and she got some good answers. (Thanks, Gail, for the tip.) It’s a question we also face in reviewing–when do we mention the ethnicity or skin color […]