>Do I call them the dragonettes?

>While there’s been quite a lot published about the first generation of children’s librarians, editors and booksellers, Barbara Bader has had the idea to take a closer look at the second generation–those who learned from those pioneers and struck out in new directions. For next year’s Horn Books, Barbara is planning a series of short […]

>One more award

>I was a member of the ALSC Distinguished Service Award committee this year, along with Cynthia Richey (chair, and a new friend), Joan Atkinson (an old YASD–yes, that old–buddy with whom it was great fun to work again), Peggy Sullivan (who I’ve known since library school), and Terry Borzumato-Greenberg (from Holiday House; the youngest person […]

>So long, Claire-bear

>I’m sorry to have to tell you that our cherished Claire Gross is soon to depart these glamorous environs for the delights of the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, home of many Horn Book friends including Betsy Hearne, Christine Jenkins and Deborah Stevenson. So now you will […]

>More Meta

>In Betsy Bird’s SLJ article “This Blog’s for You” (and I thank her for including Read Roger in the list of “Ten Blogs You Can’t Live Without”), she asks a bunch of swell questions: Do kids’ lit bloggers influence publishing decisions? Are library systems basing their purchasing decisions on our recommendations? Should they? And to […]

>Good luck with that

>I’m not sure just how sustainable e-lending e-books is going to be for public libraries. Three points made in yesterday’s Times article about the practice moved my eyebrows higher and higher until they were indistinguishable from my hair: “’People still think of libraries as old dusty books on shelves, and it’s a perception we’re always […]

>A conspiracy theory of reviewing

>Editorial Anonymous has, for writers, some good news and some good news about children’s books reviews. The good news, she (?) says, is that good reviews can help sell books. And the other good news is that bad reviews won’t hurt selling books. I have a more nuanced opinion. More and more children’s books are […]

>More weeding wisdom

>From Work with Children in Public Libraries by Effie L. Power (ALA, 1943): “Nationality and race influence mode and type of reading and therefore library selection. Jewish boys and girls are inclined to read serious books on mature subjects, and Italian children who live most naturally out-of-doors under sunny skies read reluctantly but enjoy picture […]

>Houston, you have a problem.

>I will be in Houston for the Texas Library Association meeting this week. Unless you are a demonic rabbit or a cranky illustrator, come find me at the Horn Book booth all day Wednesday and on Thursday morning.

>Put It Where You Want It

>Debra Lau Whelan’s SLJ article on where librarians are shelving The Graveyard Book is classic shit-stirring. The article’s lead asks a question (“Where does the book belong—in the children’s area or in the teen section?”) and then goes on to give selective anecdotal evidence to conclude that any decision to put the book in YA […]

>Into the West

>Not with the hobbits but with the intrepid lady librarians who left the library school founded in Illinois by Katharine Sharp in 1897 to pioneer library services in the wild wild west. No slouch in the lady-librarian pantheon herself, my former boss and perpetual role model Betsy Hearne narrates a brief film about their adventures.