The Birchbark House

The Birchbark House

Louise Erdrich’s historical novel The Birchbark House is the first in a series, each book following a child from a different generation in an Ojibwa community. Often, books for children contain a central character who is about the same age as the book’s readers. The Birchbark House would be a tough read for most children […]

>Jokers to the left of me, jokers to the right

>Leila pointed me to this case in Seattle of Brave New World being yanked from the curriculum for being insensitive re Native Americans. The Prez has already gotten in trouble (per usual) with Fox News for the inclusion in his new picture book of Sitting Bull (http://nation.foxnews.com/media/2010/11/15/obama-praises-indian-chief-who-killed-us-general); I’m wondering if that same spread is going […]

>Hell with the Chief

>I see that the University of Illinois is–finally–retiring its octogenarian mascot, Chief Illiniwek. If you need to be convinced of how this is related to children’s literature, take a look at some of Debbie Reese‘s work, which includes a Horn Book article from 1998 that can be found here.