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British (and Aussie and Kiwi!) invasion

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Our fandom knows no borders! Some of our best-loved fantasy authors come to us from across the pond (or, in Garth Nix’s and Margaret Mahy’s cases, across the equator). We’ve highlighted a few essential articles by/about each author, as well some adoring blog posts; click on an author’s name to see all Horn Book content […]

Review of The Amber Spyglass

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The Amber Spyglass by Philip Pullman Middle School, High School     Knopf     523 pp. 10/00     0-679-87926-9     $19.95 Armed with a rare numbered typescript copy of The Amber Spyglass, I’m tempted to roll up my shirtsleeves, light a cigar, splash some Tokay into a glass, and discuss fine points of reason, fancy, and theology before all hell […]

Philip Pullman’s “The Collectors”

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It’s been quite some time since fans of Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials series have had any new… well, material… to sate us. After the trilogy — The Golden Compass, The Subtle Knife, and The Amber Spyglass — concluded in 2000, Pullman briefly returned to the universe in Lyra’s Oxford (2003) and Once Upon a […]

>Can I buy an umlaut?

>I love it when my second-favorite magazine meets the interests of my first: “The young miller is naive, vulnerable and over-enthusiastic, with a poetic imagination, but not psychotic! As to the cycle’s ending, his death in the brook makes me think of the Philip Pullman trilogy His Dark Materials. Pullman imagines death as a dispersal […]

>This sounds like fun

>My old friend Brian Alderson and Books for Keeps editor Rosemary Stones are going to be conducting a five day course about Philip Pullman in France this June. If that is not enough, listen to this from the course brochure: “Le Verger is a beautifully renovated complex of farm buildings in a small village in […]

>Philip Gets His Groove Back

>After his unusual demureness in face of the star-making machinery, I’m pleased to see Philip Pullman recovering his characteristic pugnacity to defend his dark materials from the interference of the interfering Faithful: “Religion grants its adherents malign, intoxicating and morally corrosive sensations. Destroying intellectual freedom is always evil, but only religion makes doing evil feel […]

>But enough about you. Or me.

>As we did late last year, Child_Lit has been discussing the U.K.’s age-banding proposal with some ferocity the past few days. While I am firmly in the camp of those who oppose the scheme, a speech Philip Pullman gave on the subject is working my nerves. It’s very much a speech to the choir (which […]

>Take that.

>As the suit over publication of “The Harry Potter Lexicon” begins in New York, Laurie Frost’s The Elements of His Dark Materials: A Guide to Philip Pullman’s Trilogy (The Fell Press) has just come across my desk. Like the as-yet-unpublished “Lexicon,” Elements contains all manner of facts collated from the object work; unlike that project, […]

>And I promise not to withdraw it.

>Claire’s review of The Golden Compass is here.

>Second thoughts?

>Alerted by an anonymous commenter, I see that the Catholic News Service has withdrawn its review of The Golden Compass. Without comment. Maybe the Magisterium is at work.