The e-Future

Treasure Island in multiple forms

The topic is daunting. Imagine someone coming up to Gutenberg while he was working out the kinks on his first press and asking, “So, John, where’s this printing thing going?” I’ve spent the last few years prowling in the digital space and am more or less up to speed on what’s happening now, but the […]

What Hath Harry Wrought?

Sutton bookstack

Just to get a sense of historical perspective, when I last spoke at this festival, there was no euro, no iPods, no Wikipedia, no Facebook; Pluto was still a planet; and I was still drinking. More to the point—today’s point—is that Harry Potter had yet to appear on our side of the pond. That would […]

Five questions for Leo Landry

LeoLandry_250pix

Author-illustrator Leo Landry, a twenty-year bookselling veteran of The Children’s Book Shop in Brookline, Massachusetts, is the creator of picture books (Space Boy; Eat Your Peas, Ivy Louise!), as well as chapter books (Fat Bat and Swoop; Sea Surprise); newly independent readers should line up for Grin and Bear It, his latest offering. In this […]

>Flunk reading, do not go directly to jail.

>Apparently some politicos are fond of spouting a factoid (please note correct usage, book reviewers everywhere) that links third-grade reading scores to the formulas states use to estimate their future requirements for prison beds. Not so. No word yet whether or not Baby Einstein foretells a playdate with Old Sparky.

>Actually, should you even be here?

>Is reading on the web going to destroy our children’s ability to read books? Does it matter? Here’s an excellent article on those questions. Have you noticed how much the web likes to talk about itself? That’s what I find worrying!

>"Crap, here comes Teacher!"

>In the comments on the earlier post about dueling reviews, `h wrote: Speaking of the good stick. There’s something I’d like you to measure — heavy handed instruction — when an author sticks something into the text that clearly doesn’t fit in order to model some lesson– girls are just as smart as boys, or […]

>Maybe they were on to something,

>those YA writerswho madespareness of linelook likepoetry. The company Live Ink believes this in fact is a more efficient way to read prose. Look here to see what they’ve done with Moby-Dick.