Subscribe to The Horn Book

Hbook Podcast 1.32 – Special Guest Betsy Bird

HBPodcast_photologo_cropped

Podcast the 32nd in which Siân chats with blogger and librarian Betsy Bird about religion in books and publishing. Books we talk about Jazz Day: The Making of a Famous Photograph by Roxane Orgill and Francis Vallejo Harry Potter, obvi Miracle Man by John Hendrix The Inquisitor’s Tale by Adam Gidwitz and Hatem Aly Rebel Genius […]

The Pocket Bible Doodle Book

pocket bible doodle book

A blurb on the back of The Pocket Bible Doodle Book (Zonderkidz/Zondervan, January) states, “The story of creation, Noah’s ark, the plagues, and more make this Bible-based collection of doodles fun for everyone.” I can’t decide if I should laugh or be offended—the plagues can be fun? Okay… As the daughter of a Lutheran pastor, […]

>If you liked The Lost Symbol . . .

>It occurs to me that now that Robert Langdon has raced around Rome, Paris, and D.C. he ought to go to New York; precisely to Madeleine L’Engle’s current residence, the Cathedral of St. John the Divine. His readers would love her; hers, I’m not so sure about.

My new secret boyfriend

Like Leila, I’m in something of a reading slump, or in my case listening, as none of the several audiobooks I read on my commute seem to be doing it for me. The new Anna Pigeon mystery reminds me of why I gave up on Nevada Barr years ago (lurid and incoherent); Elizabeth and Mary […]

>Philip Gets His Groove Back

>After his unusual demureness in face of the star-making machinery, I’m pleased to see Philip Pullman recovering his characteristic pugnacity to defend his dark materials from the interference of the interfering Faithful: “Religion grants its adherents malign, intoxicating and morally corrosive sensations. Destroying intellectual freedom is always evil, but only religion makes doing evil feel […]

It ain’t all Demi

Claire looks at Buddhism and Hinduism in her ongoing series of booklists on world religions. A semi-related question: people who went to college a generation after I did swear that Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children is the greatest book they ever read. Is it hard?

>At the Movies

>Anita Burkam reviews Prince Caspian.

>Good for the Jews

>and good for you, too: Claire’s latest booklist.

>Reading religiously

>Claire’s been doing just that.

The Republic of Heaven

nd01

What happens to the Kingdom of Heaven when the King dies? And what has this to do with children’s literature? Children’s books, as readers of this journal are well aware, are capable of expressing just about any idea, and illuminating just about any subject. Well, I certainly haven’t read all the children’s books there are; […]