>Is It a Crime?

>Drinks for anyone but Elizabeth who can identify the musical quoted in the title. The Simmons program Crime and Misdemeanors is ending this morning with closing remarks from M.T. Anderson, and my responsibilities–save paper-grading–will be through. I’ve been twittering away from the back of the room, but it’s difficult to convey the extravagant genius and […]

>When writers attack!

>I wonder what you call the Twitter equivalent to drunk dialing? And if you’re going to whine about how you used to be reviewed (and how that must hurt) by Anne Tyler, it might be politic to spell her name right. [Update 11:45 AM. It looks like Alice Hoffman wisely thought to retreat from the […]

>Who’s reading YA?

>A tweet from Chair, Fireplace, etc. led me to this article questioning the link between the health of YA as a publishing category and the assumption that it means teen reading is flourishing. Every time I see The Book Thief on bestseller charts I wonder about this correlation, and I also think the question speaks […]

Publishers and bloggers

  In a comment on a recent thread, Elizabeth posted a comment that I thought deserved its own discussion so I moved it here for your consideration: Re. the question of anonymous posting, I seem to be the only person who holds the opinion that I would prefer to see people use their names, yet […]

>Blogs and buzz

>Here and elsewhere, there have been some valuable discussions about children’s book reviewing on blogs and an email I just got has me wondering about the distinction between book reviewing and book buzz. The email, of the multiple-recipients variety, was from Penguin: “Have you read FIRE yet? We want to know what you think! Please […]

>"The fanboys can be merciless."

>This Times article about the gypsies invading the castle of professional film criticism has a lot of import to the kidlitosphere as well, as amateur (I use the word in a strict sense) and independent critics join the established professional players in reviewing new books for children. I like what A. O. Scott has to […]

>Think of the grownups.

>A discussion on child_lit about book reviews that give away a book’s plot twist or ending led NYPLer John Peters to post a link to Library Journal‘s announcement that it had begun editing its reviews with the reader–rather than the librarian selecting for that reader–in mind, as well as making them more Twitterific. Meaning: because […]

>How Others See Us

>The New York Times obituary for Eden is a gracious tribute but does that thing I hate: “Eden Ross Lipson . . . was a force in bringing the enchanting but often overlooked world of children’s literature to wide public awareness.” The REASON children’s literature is overlooked is because we persist in regarding it as […]

>R.I.P. Eden

>Former New York Times children’s book editor Eden Ross Lipson died this morning. She was the editor who first hired me to write for the Times, and she taught me a lot in regard to how to write for a general audience about children’s books. We became pals over the years and I’ll miss her. […]

>X hits the spot

>Reviewer X has a good discussion going on blog reviewing. I confess I’m dying to try Twitter if only to see just WHO is: comparing their “hit lists” for authors they plan to ask for ARCs, trading e-mail addresses and results, complaining about whether they’re getting an ARC, and actually encouraging each other to send […]