>Milton Meltzer, 94

>”That damned Horn Book”–the first words Milton Meltzer ever said to me, upon our mutual introduction fifteen years ago. Meltzer was ever-watchful of how the review journals were treating nonfiction books, a crusade begun by him in our pages more than thirty years ago. We commemorate the passing, on September 19th, of this omnivorously curious […]

>Digital reviewing

>We had a call this morning from a publisher who is thinking about supplying reviewers with f&gs of picture books in digital form and wanted to know if Horn Book could work with that/those. I demurred. Electronic galleys for fiction, maybe. Although my Kindle gathers dust (too hard to hold; I hate the buttons and […]

>Karla Kuskin

>Very sorry to read of Karla Kuskin’s death last week; there’s an informative and appreciative obituary in the New York Times. I was lucky enough to work with Karla ten years ago when I asked her to write something for us about reviewing picture books, a craft at which she excelled.

>Is It a Crime?

>Drinks for anyone but Elizabeth who can identify the musical quoted in the title. The Simmons program Crime and Misdemeanors is ending this morning with closing remarks from M.T. Anderson, and my responsibilities–save paper-grading–will be through. I’ve been twittering away from the back of the room, but it’s difficult to convey the extravagant genius and […]

>When writers attack!

>I wonder what you call the Twitter equivalent to drunk dialing? And if you’re going to whine about how you used to be reviewed (and how that must hurt) by Anne Tyler, it might be politic to spell her name right. [Update 11:45 AM. It looks like Alice Hoffman wisely thought to retreat from the […]

>Who’s reading YA?

>A tweet from Chair, Fireplace, etc. led me to this article questioning the link between the health of YA as a publishing category and the assumption that it means teen reading is flourishing. Every time I see The Book Thief on bestseller charts I wonder about this correlation, and I also think the question speaks […]

Publishers and bloggers

  In a comment on a recent thread, Elizabeth posted a comment that I thought deserved its own discussion so I moved it here for your consideration: Re. the question of anonymous posting, I seem to be the only person who holds the opinion that I would prefer to see people use their names, yet […]

>Blogs and buzz

>Here and elsewhere, there have been some valuable discussions about children’s book reviewing on blogs and an email I just got has me wondering about the distinction between book reviewing and book buzz. The email, of the multiple-recipients variety, was from Penguin: “Have you read FIRE yet? We want to know what you think! Please […]

>"The fanboys can be merciless."

>This Times article about the gypsies invading the castle of professional film criticism has a lot of import to the kidlitosphere as well, as amateur (I use the word in a strict sense) and independent critics join the established professional players in reviewing new books for children. I like what A. O. Scott has to […]

>Think of the grownups.

>A discussion on child_lit about book reviews that give away a book’s plot twist or ending led NYPLer John Peters to post a link to Library Journal‘s announcement that it had begun editing its reviews with the reader–rather than the librarian selecting for that reader–in mind, as well as making them more Twitterific. Meaning: because […]