Books for Darfur

what you wish for

> What You Wish For, a collection of short stories exploring the topic of wishes, will be published this September by Putnam and The Book Wish Foundation. Book Wish will be contributing their share of the proceeds and all donations to UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR to help fund libraries in Darfur. The deadline to donate […]

How pleasant, indeed.

Chronicle has just published His Shoes Were Far Too Tight, a collection of Edward Lear’s poems, selected and introduced by author/NPR commentator Daniel Pinkwater. The collection is illustrated by Calef Brown, a fabulous children’s poet himself. With the book we received a CD of the euphonious Pinkwater narrating five of the poems. My favorite is […]

Why is it always the redhead? —or— How to use stock photos sparingly

While perusing Cliques by Toney Allman, part of Lucent Books’ long-running Hot Topics series for middle-schoolers, I noticed this poor girl, presumably being teased about her hair. “Why is it always the redhead?” thought I. From Anne Shirley (and doesn’t it look like this little lady’s ready to break her slate over somebody’s head?), to […]

Post-mortem

> After some fierce competition—including a first-round heartbreaker storming back from the dead!—Jonathan Stroud’s The Ring of Solomon won School Library Journal’s Battle of the Kids’ Books. To get the inside scoop, we caught up with Battle Commentator Jonathan Hunt. First things first: Did the best man win? I certainly think you can make a […]

Get “The Goods”

from Adam Rex’s “Abraham SuperLincoln” Venerable-yet-irreverent multimedia publisher McSweeney’s recently announced a new project: “The Goods,” a weekly newspaper insert offering “a gallimaufry of games, puzzles, comics, and other diversions” created by children’s authors and illustrators. Looking at their line-up — headed by such heavy hitters as Mo Willems, Laurie Keller, Lane Smith, Bob Shea, Adam […]

Public Service Announcement

Children’s Technology Review is a monthly Consumer Reports-like PDF newsletter “designed to summarize the latest products and trends in children’s interactive media.” They review lots of children’s apps, of course, and they’ve ventured into book app territory, as well. Their focus, natch, is on the quality of the technology rather than the text and illustrations, […]

Celeb BFF wisdom?

Like many children who grew up in the nineties, I know who Elizabeth Berkley is—she played Jessie Spano on the popular, heavily syndicated Saved by the Bell. So when Ask Elizabeth (Putnam, March) came into the office, I snatched it up out of curiosity (and perhaps fear). As it turns out, it’s getting a lot […]

“It’s your Day of all Days! It’s the Best of the Best!”

As you may have noticed, yesterday was Dr. Seuss’s 107th birthday (and the 14th annual Read Across America Day). I celebrated by drooling over the unbelievable Dr. Seuss-themed goodies over at Cakewrecks and making a birthday card for the good doctor with an app from Oceanhouse Media:   I really would have liked to party […]

Blogging women’s history books

>A full month of blog posts commemorating women’s history begins today on KidLit Celebrates Women’s History Month. Creators and critics of children’s literature (including Anita Silvey, Candace Fleming, Kathleen Krull, and Tanya Bolden) will highlight excellent books about women’s history. The blog is off to a great start with a review of Laurie Halse Anderson’s […]

Celebrating Virginia Hamilton

I recently read and reviewed The Other Side of Dark by Sarah Smith, a book about the ways slavery and the Underground Railroad still haunt us (both metaphorically and literally). It had me wanting to reread The House of Dies Drear and wishing my copy were with me in Boston rather than in California at […]