“It’s your Day of all Days! It’s the Best of the Best!”

As you may have noticed, yesterday was Dr. Seuss’s 107th birthday (and the 14th annual Read Across America Day). I celebrated by drooling over the unbelievable Dr. Seuss-themed goodies over at Cakewrecks and making a birthday card for the good doctor with an app from Oceanhouse Media:   I really would have liked to party […]

Blogging women’s history books

>A full month of blog posts commemorating women’s history begins today on KidLit Celebrates Women’s History Month. Creators and critics of children’s literature (including Anita Silvey, Candace Fleming, Kathleen Krull, and Tanya Bolden) will highlight excellent books about women’s history. The blog is off to a great start with a review of Laurie Halse Anderson’s […]

Celebrating Virginia Hamilton

I recently read and reviewed The Other Side of Dark by Sarah Smith, a book about the ways slavery and the Underground Railroad still haunt us (both metaphorically and literally). It had me wanting to reread The House of Dies Drear and wishing my copy were with me in Boston rather than in California at […]

A story worth hearing

The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amherst, MA will host an event (free with admission) with Jerry Pinkney on Saturday, February 12, at 1 p.m. In “A Story Worth Telling,” the Caldecott-winning author/illustrator will look back on his fifty years of picture book–making—and, of course, sign his many beautiful books. Anybody wanna […]

Snow day confessions

What did the Horn Book staff read during their snow day yesterday? You may be surprised! Roger: I started listening to Cocaine Blues by Kerry Greenwood. It’s the first in a detective series set in the 1920s; here our Bright Young Thing heroine the Hon. Phyrne Fisher, bored with London, goes to Melbourne and finds […]

I’m feeling verklempt.

We saw a critic’s pros and cons regarding children’s apps; yesterday’s Boston Globe presented those of parents. Here’s your topic: are children’s apps educational and entertaining, or mind-numbing and soul-sucking? All of the above? None of the above? Discuss amongst yourselves.

I can’t wait for The Story of Mankind in 90 seconds.

Author Jamie James Kennedy (The Order of Odd-Fish) and the New York Public Library are hosting a 90-Second Newbery Film Festival. Kids up to 18 can choose any Newbery Medal or Newbery Honor book, adapt it into a 90-second (or shorter) video, and submit it to Mr. Kennedy by September 15 for a chance to […]

The drama of the page-scroll

I have to admit to having some trepidation in reviewing children’s apps. It’s clear that book-related apps for kids are a different animal from kids’ books — but how different are they? Is what makes a good app the same as what makes a good book? Can I still talk about “the drama of the […]