David Levithan on Every Day

david levithan

From the November/December 2012 issue of The Horn Book Magazine: Reviewer Christine Hepperman asks author and editor David Levithan about writing gender (and the lack thereof) in his YA novel Every Day. Read the full review of Every Day here. Christine Hepperman: Were there specific challenges in writing a character who is both genders and […]

Review of Every Day

every day

Every Day by David Levithan Middle School, High School    Knopf    325 pp. 8/12    978-0-307-93188-7    $16.99 Library ed.  978-0-375-97111-2    $19.99 e-book ed.  978-0-307-97563-8    $10.99 “A,” the narrator of Levithan’s brilliantly conceived novel, wakes up in a different sixteen-year-old’s body every morning and has to adjust to different physical characteristics, a different family, a different school, different […]

Make it a triple

LateGreatMe

We saw Flight last weekend, and the first two hours were completely riveting both for–SPOILER–the minute-by-minute, you-are-there depiction of a plane flight in increasingly worse trouble; and for Denzel Washington’s portrayal of a bad-boy pilot who enjoys a drink or three. Upon takeoff. But–SPOILERRR–the last twenty minutes encompassed no fewer than three endings as the […]

Fly blind, suggests Susan

Krantz

Horn Book reviewer Susan Dove Lempke writes about being a proud defender of spoilers who met her Kryptonite in Code Name Verity. I recently listened to the fabulous audio edition of the book, and, despite, knowing how everything would turn out, found myself so taken in by the voice that I kept hoping the book […]

Which would YOU rather read?

HandsWings

  Personally, I find the ARC cover more to my liking (and truer to the story), and the final art makes the book look like it’s about an angel who moonlights as a stripper. But then, I’m not a fourteen-year-old girl.

Rookie Yearbook One

Rookie Yearbook One

I’ve been a steadfast follower of blogger Tavi Gevinson and her fashion/feminist escapades for years now, so perhaps I am a biased reader, but I absolutely loved Rookie Yearbook One (Drawn & Quarterly, September 2012), a massive compilation of all of Rookie Mag‘s brightest moments. Rookie Magazine, an online magazine aimed at teenage girls, was […]

Apres la guerre

ChocolateWar

Pursuant to an article coming up next year in the Magazine, we were having an old discussion today: how do teen readers feel about downer endings? Conventional professional wisdom has long been that teens themselves and open-minded adults applaud (where appropriate) an “uncompromising” conclusion to a book, and only conservative, rigid adults who don’t like […]

Five Questions for Caroline B. Cooney

Caroline Cooney

Veteran YA novelist Caroline B. Cooney is providing the keynote address for School Library Journal‘s upcoming virtual conference, SummerTeen: A Celebration of YA Books, and I thought this would be a good time to ask her about her electronic life–via email, of course.   Roger Sutton: Your latest novel The Lost Songs (Delacorte) relies on […]

From the Editor – July 2012

roger_right2

The YA book boom seems to be continuing with no sign of abating, and I continue to be in awe of the Horn Book editors and reviewers who patiently (okay, maybe not always patiently — see this one trend Katie and Elissa spotted) go through them to tell you about the best. Here is some […]

Strange bedfellows: Suzanne Collins, Kristin Cashore, and who?

Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas

Startlingly similar blurbs on the ARCs of these upcoming YA titles grabbed my attention. on Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas (Bloomsbury, August 2012): “perfect for fans of George R.R. Martin and Suzanne Collins” on Falling Kingdoms by Morgan Rhodes (Penguin/Razorbill, December 2012): “ideal for fans of George R.R. Martin and Kristin Cashore” As […]