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The other g-word

I’m just writing up a notice for Artist to Artist: 23 Major Illustrators Talk to Children about Their Art (Philomel), which isn’t really for kids but is an extremely handsome exhibition-in-pages of some great illustrators, including for each a gorgeously reproduced self-portrait as well as photos of their workspaces and preliminary studies and sketches. With […]

Letters to the Editor from September/October 2001

These Letters to the Editor are in response to Marc Aronson’s article in the May/June 2001 Horn Book Magazine, “Slippery Slopes and Proliferating Prizes.” In the September/October 2001 Magazine, Andrea Davis Pinkney responded with her article, “Awards that Stand on Solid Ground.” Marc Aronson says he wants to debate the merits of what he calls […]

Awards that Stand on Solid Ground

It was with great interest that I read Marc Aronson’s article, “Slippery Slopes and Proliferating Prizes,” in the May/June 2001 issue of this publication. I appreciate the author’s insight into ALA awards, such as the Coretta Scott King Award (CSK) and the Pura Belpré, that celebrate the cultural and ethnic diversities of authors and illustrators. […]

Slippery Slopes and Proliferating Prizes

I’m sure that nearly every reader of this magazine is in favor of supporting a more diverse children’s literature that is in tune with the increasingly multi-ethnic environment in which we and our children live. I am equally convinced, though, that ALA’s sponsorship of three awards in which a book’s eligibility is determined by the […]

Responses to January 1996 editorial

The letters below were all in response to the January/February 1996 editorial by Martha V. Parravano and Lauren Adams, “A Wider Vision for the Newbery.” I just read the editorial in the January/February issue of the Horn Book. Right on! I did not realize that a Newbery Medal had not been awarded to a non-white […]

A Wider Vision for the Newbery

Editorial by Martha V. Parravano and Lauren Adams At first glance, the last ten years appear to have seen a remarkable diversity of books honored by the Newbery award. Poetry and nonfiction have both won medals (Paul Fleischman’s Joyful Noise [Harper] and Russell Freedman’s Lincoln [Clarion]); and a wide range of books, from folklore to […]

Could Randolph Caldecott Win the Caldecott Medal?

by Anita Silvey With this editorial I do not mean to cast aspersion on this year’s Caldecott choice or on any particular choice of the Caldecott Committee over the past dozen years but to talk about a trend in the selection process. Since I worked with and supported Chris Van Allsburg during the beginning of […]

Could Randolph Caldecott Win the Caldecott Medal?

With this editorial I do not mean to cast aspersion on this year’s Caldecott choice or on any particular choice of the Caldecott Committee over the past dozen years but to talk about a trend in the selection process. Since I worked with and supported Chris Van Allsburg during the beginning of his career in children’s […]

Where Do All the Prizes Go?: The Case for Nonfiction

By Milton Meltzer Every year since 1922 the Newbery Medal has been awarded to an author for “the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children.“ Of the fifty-three Newbery winners to date, how many have been nonfiction? Only five: Hendrik Van Loon’s Story of Mankind (Liveright), the very first, in 1922; Cornelia Meigs’ Invincible Louisa (Little), 1934; […]

A Letter to Lillian N. Gerhardt

Ethel Heins’s response to Lillian N. Gerhardt’s “A Letter to Ethel Heins.” From School Library Journal, Nov. 1975. © 1975 R. R. Bowker Company / A Xerox Corporation. Used with permission.   By Ethel L. Heins I have read your lengthy editorial letter to me (SLJ, September) and find it difficult to believe that my […]