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Archives for 1965

Walt Disney Accused

In the spring of this year Max Rafferty, California’s Superintendent of Public Instruction, wrote an article praising Walt Disney as “the greatest educator of this century.” Frances Clarke Sayers challenged Dr. Rafferty’s stand in a letter to the Los Angeles Times, which we reprint with Mrs. Sayers’ permission. It is a pity, in this fairest […]

Walt Disney Accused

In the spring of this year Max Rafferty, California’s Superintendent of Public Instruction, wrote an article praising Walt Disney as “the greatest educator of this century.” Frances Clarke Sayers challenged Dr. Rafferty’s stand in a letter to the Los Angeles Times, which we reprint with Mrs. Sayers’ permission. It is a pity, in this fairest […]

Horn Book Fanfare 1965

Best books of 1965 Chosen annually by our editors, Fanfare is The Horn Book Magazine’s selection of the best children’s and young adult books of the year. Picture Books The Courtship, Merry Marriage, and Feast of Cock Robin and Jenny Wren… illustrated by Barbara Cooney (Scribner) David and Goliath written by Beatrice Schenk de Regniers, […]

Lloyd Alexander Letter to Ruth Hill Viguers (June 1, 1965)

  1 June, 1965 Dear Ruth: I hope it’s permissible for an author to spend an inordinate number of hours in gleeful pride (or prideful glee?) over a review in THE HORN BOOK. In any case, that’s what I’ve been doing. Well, needless to say I’m delighted you liked THE BLACK CAULDRON. Seriously delighted, for […]

Lloyd Alexander Letter to Ruth Hill Viguers (June 1, 1965)

  1 June, 1965 Dear Ruth: I hope it’s permissible for an author to spend an inordinate number of hours in gleeful pride (or prideful glee?) over a  review in THE HORN BOOK. In any case, that’s what I’ve been doing. Well, needless to say I’m delighted you liked THE BLACK CAULDRON. Seriously delighted, for […]

The Flat-Heeled Muse

by Lloyd Alexander The muse in charge of fantasy wears good, sensible shoes. No foam-born Aphrodite, she vaguely resembles my old piano teacher, who was keen on metronomes. She does not carry a soothing lyre for inspiration, but is more likely to shake you roughly awake at four in the morning and rattle a sheaf […]

On Spies and Applesauce and Such

The arrival of Harriet the Spy with fanfare and announcements of approval for its “realism” makes me wonder again why that word is invariably applied to stories about disagreeable people and situations. Are there really no amiable children? No loyal friends? No parents who are fundamentally loving and understanding? I challenge the implication that New […]