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>Who needs Judy Miller?

>The children’s-book beat at the New York Times does just fine without her. Last year, they somehow got an early copy of the last Harry Potter into Michiko Kakutani’s hands; now reporter Dinitia Smith has broken into S&S/Margaret K. McElderry headquarters to swipe a copy of the “embargoed” Peter Pan in Scarlet.

Actually, I imagine there is a copy of the manuscript in Times children’s book editor Julie Just’s office just as there is in mine. Unlike the Harry Potter books from Scholastic, S&S sent out review copies of Peter Pan in Scarlet with the proviso that no coverage appear before the pub date in October. (They wanted a signed agreement to that effect, but didn’t get one from us.) That’s fine by me: however “authorized,” a sequel to Peter Pan is not exactly breaking news–unless your news is breaking the embargo. Emma Dryden, you evil genius.

Roger Sutton About Roger Sutton

Roger Sutton has been the editor in chief of The Horn Book, Inc, since 1996. He was previously editor of The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books and a children's and young adult librarian. He received his M.A. in library science from the University of Chicago in 1982 and a B.A. from Pitzer College in 1978. Follow him on Twitter: @RogerReads.

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Comments

  1. Monica Edinger says:

    >I must say I too wondered — after all, popular culturewise Peter Pan is no Harry Potter (although in a different conversation, I might well say Harry is no Peter).

    NYTimes is on a roll with BIG children’s literature articles of late— Gary Paulsen got serious space on Saturday.

  2. rindawriter says:

    >This was funny. I had no idea, I had NO idea…I am getting un-naived so quickly here…

  3. Roger Sutton says:

    >I haven’t quite figured out how to make links in the comments section; the Independent story on the Peter Pan leak is at:
    http://enjoyment.independent.co.uk/books/news/article1222582.ece

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