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A Call for Mocks!

shareThe fall is whooshing by, and here at Calling Caldecott we’ve just about covered the spring 2015 titles (those published from January thru June) —whew! — and are ready to move on to discussing the fall season’s books. But time feels short.

With ALA Midwinter being so early this year, perhaps you’ve already begun to organize your local school or library Mock Caldecott discussions. We’d love to hear about them — from your shortlists to your process to the outcomes.

Here’s a link, if you’re interested, to a post Robin wrote a few years ago about her own classroom process.

Please share your experiences below. Thank you!

 

Martha V. Parravano About Martha V. Parravano

Martha V. Parravano is book review editor of The Horn Book, Inc., and co-author of the Calling Caldecott blog.

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  1. We do a longlist (25 titles) for the Mocks here in Cincinnati (in conjunction with the PL of Cinci and Hamilton County, the Lane Libraries, and any number of local schools and northern Kentucky libraries). Here are the 25 books we’re going to look at for our December 3 in-person discussion:

    ● The Bear ate your sandwich – Julia Sarcone-Roach
    ● Beastly Verse – JooHee Yoon (written by various poets)
    ● Bird & Diz – Ed Young (written by Gary Golio)
    ● Drowned City: Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans – Don Brown
    ● Drum Dream Girl: How one girl’s courage changed music – Rafael Lopez (written by Margarita Engle)
    ● Emmanuel’s Dream: The true story of Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah – Sean Qualls (written by Laurie Ann Thompson)
    ● A Fine Dessert: Four centuries, four families, one delicious treat – Sophie Blackall (written by Emily Jenkins)
    ● Float – Daniel Miyares
    ● Funny Bones: Posada and his Day of the Dead Calaveras – Duncan Tonatiuh
    ● Gingerbread for Liberty!: How a German baker helped win the American Revolution – Vincent X. Kirsch (written by Mara Rockliff)
    ● Hiawatha and the Peacemaker – David Shannon (written by Robbie Robertson)
    ● How Jelly Roll Morton Invented Jazz – Keith Mallett (written by Jonah Winter)
    ● If You Plant a Seed – Kadir Nelson
    ● Jake Makes a World: Jacob Lawrence, a young artist in Harlem – Christopher Myers (written by Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts)
    ● Last Stop on Market Street – Christian Robinson (written by Matt de la Pena)
    ● Lillian’s Right to Vote: A Celebration of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 – Shane W. Evans (written by Jonah Winter)
    ● Marvelous Cornelius: Hurricane Katrina and the Spirit of New Orleans – John Parra (written by Phil Bildner)
    ● The Moon is going to Addy’s house – Ida Pearle
    ● The Night World – Mordecai Gerstein
    ● Raindrops Roll – April Pulley Sayre
    ● The Skunk – Patrick McDonnell (written by Mac Barnett)
    ● Supertruck – Stephen Savage
    ● Tricky Vic: The impossibly true story of the man who sold the Eiffel Tower – Greg Pizzoli
    ● Trombone Shorty – Bryan Collier (written by Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews)
    ● Water is Water: A book about the Water Cycle – Jason Chin (written by Miranda Paul)

  2. I run my daughters’ public school library as a volunteer and don’t get a lot of support from the administration, and the teachers tend to be overwhelmed with test prep and the like. So my mock Caldecott is a little looser. I pick 10-12 books and have the children rank their top 3. I try to spend time reading some of the books and discussing the criteria with the younger grades, but the teachers of older students usually can’t take the time for that. Although I know the committee does not consider the following factors, I do: diversity of artistic styles, wordless books v those with text, diversity of subjects, diversity of authors, diversity of illustrators, fiction v nonfiction, and I try to have a good mix of titles for the students to look at. This year I’m still finalizing the list but tentatively it is:

    Finding Winnie
    Waiting
    Water is Water
    My Pen
    The Whisper
    A Fine Dessert
    Drum Dream Girl
    We Forgot Brock!
    In A Village By the Sea
    Lenny and Lucy
    Tricky Vic
    Home (is it eligible? I haven’t seen it mentioned anywhere)

  3. Jonathan Hunt says:

    This is what we are using in San Diego (co-presented by SDCL and SDCOE) . . .

    WAITING/Henkes
    SUPERTRUCK/Savage
    DROWNED CITY/Brown
    A FINE DESSERT/Blackall
    IN A VILLAGE BY THE SEA/Chu
    LEO: A GHOST STORY/Robinson
    FLOAT/Miyares
    BIG BEAR, LITTLE CHAIR/Boyd

    We’re holding ours on Wednesday, December 9 @ 6:30 pm. Contact me for details . . .

  4. I have been doing Mock Caldecotts for years but recently teamed with Katherine Sokolowski in Illinois.
    http://librariansquest.blogspot.com/p/mock-caldecott.html

  5. The Sacramento Public Library 2015 Mock Caldecott Discussion Titles will be:

    The Bear Ate Your Sandwich
    A Fine Dessert
    Float
    If You Plant a Seed
    Last Stop on Market Street
    Lenny & Lucy
    Trombone Shorty
    Waiting

    It’s so difficult getting that shortlist down to 8, but we hold our Mock as a staff development opportunity in early December (the 11th, this year) and have to limit ourselves to what could reasonably be discussed in our allotted time. With more space I would have loved to have seen Water is Water, Home, and Tricky Vic included in our discussion, but I think we came up with a solid list.

  6. Jonathan Hunt says:

    I’ve done my Speed Dating Mock Caldecott in 4 cities this week with 8 books: WAIT, SUPERTRUCK, FIRE ENGINE NO. 9, IT’S ONLY STANLEY, IN A VILLAGE BY THE SEA, THE SKUNK, WATER IS WATER, and BOATS FOR PAPA. These are groups of school librarians.

    Kansas City
    Medal: IN A VILLAGE BY THE SEA
    Honors: WATER IS WATER and WAIT

    Salt Lake City
    Medal: WATER IS WATER
    Honors: IN A VILLAGE BY THE SEA and WAIT

    Portland
    Medal: FIRE ENGINE NO.9
    Honor: WATER IS WATER

    Seattle
    Medal: IN A VILLAGE BY THE SEA
    Honor: WAIT

  7. Michele Rees says:

    These are the titles I will be using at Etna Road Elementary in Whitehall, OH
    Bear Ate Your Sandwich
    Last Stop on Market Street
    My Pen
    Drum Dream Girl
    Boats for Papa
    Waiting
    Tricky Vic
    Trombone Shorty
    Lenny and Lucy
    A Fine Dessert

  8. Chiming in belatedly with the list from my library’s Mock caldecott:
    THE BEAT ATE YOUR SANDWICH
    BY MOUSE & FROG
    DRUM DREAM GIRL
    A FINE DESSERT
    FLOAT
    GINGERBREAD FOR LIBERTY
    GORDON PARKS
    IN A VILLAGE BY THE SEA
    IT’S ONLY STANLEY
    LEO
    THE MOON IS GOING TO ADDY’S HOUSE
    MY PEN
    THE NIGHT WORLD
    P. ZONKA LAYS AN EGG
    THE SKUNK
    SUPERTRUCK
    VOICE OF FREEDOM
    WAIT
    WATER IS WATER
    WE FORGOT BROCK
    THE WHISPER
    WINNIE
    WOLFIE THE BUNNY
    YARD SALE

  9. We held our Mock Caldecott on Monday. We discuss six books:

    Boats for Papa, by Jessixa Bagley
    Drowned City: Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans, by Don Brown
    Last Stop on Market Street, by Matt de la Pena
    The Night World, by Mordicai Gerstein
    Supertruck, by Stephen Savage
    Wait, by Antoinette Portis

    Our winner was Drowned City: Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans

    We named one honor book: Wait

  10. We held our annual Mock Caldecott this morning for staff development.
    From our discussion list of 8 titles, we came up with one winner and 3 honors (the ballot was REALLY interesting – we were crunched for time and could only take one ballot, and there was some disagreement over whether to cut things off at 1 honor or at 3).
    Our winner was: THE BEAR ATE YOUR SANDWICH
    Our honors were: FLOAT
    LAST STOP ON MARKET STREET
    WAITING

  11. I was lucky to participate in a Mock Caldecott class this past semester at Dominican University. From our nominated list of 55 titles, we slowly discussed and voted to get it down to a few titles. Our winner was IF YOU PLANT A SEED and our honors were: BIRD & DIZ, NIGHT ANIMALS, and FLOAT. You can see our mock press release here: http://butlerspantry.org/2015/12/13/gsliss-mock-caldecott-results/

    One title that we discussed and many people enjoyed was IN A VILLAGE BY THE SEA, but there were some inconsistencies with this book including that the text matching the pictures. For example, the text says they live in a small house, but the house it rather large. Also, when we follow the cricket down into his painting area, it is suppose to be under a house on stilts, but his easel or background is brick. Where did the brick come from? These little inconsistencies made the class think that it could not be considered the best picture book of the year.

  12. I ran 6 Mock Caldecotts in the past week – one at the public library and five at a local school.
    Finding Winnie, The Marvels, and We Forgot Brock each garnered two golds.
    Runners-up included: Beautiful Hands (3), by Mouse & Frog, If You Plant a Seed, Wolfie (2 each), The Whisper, Wait, Drum Dream Girl, Ada Lovelace and the Thinking Machine, Water is Water, The Night World & Fire Engine No. 9 (1 each)
    Result details and methodology here: http://carolsimonlevin.blogspot.com/2016/01/mock-caldecott-2016.html

    I loved getting to read aloud so many wonderful titles — one of my favorite parts of doing the Mock Caldecott is seeing how the kids respond to the new books — and seeing the excitement when I come into the room. The kids really look forward to this program!

    My personal favorites — I must admit I am a sucker for great illustrations complemented by a great text (even though that is not the “official” guideline):
    Last Stop on Market Street (grandmother/grandchild and city people so well imaged)
    Finding Winnie (charming, so fitting for the story)
    Trombone Shorty (so evocative of New Orleans!)
    Drum Dream Girl (gorgeously vividly Caribbean)
    In a Village by the Sea (great changes in perspective, incredible detail, full-circle story)

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