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Welcome to the Horn Book's Family Reading blog, a place devoted to offering children's book recommendations and advice about the whats and whens and whos and hows of sharing books in the home. Find us on Twitter @HornBook and on Facebook at Facebook.com/TheHornBook


On Megan Dowd Lambert’s “Dave the Potter and Stevie the Reader” (from 2011)

Megan Dowd Lambert served on the 2011 Caldecott committee, which recognized Dave the Potter: Artist, Poet, Slave as a Caldecott Honor Book (that year’s winner was A Sick Day for Amos McGee). Megan had been hesitant to share the book with her younger children: “I think perhaps I shied away from it as read-aloud fare for then four- and five-year-old Caroline and Stevie, thinking that they didn’t have the historical knowledge or maturity to grapple with the reality of Dave’s life as a slave.” When she did share the book, however, she was surprised by Stevie’s reaction. Megan’s article “Dave the Potter and Stevie the Reader” originally appeared in the July/August 2011 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

Bryan Collier also won that year’s Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award for Dave the Potter. You can find links to Collier’s acceptance speech, along with a profile of the illustrator, here at Lolly’s Classroom.

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This year’s Horn Book holiday outing was at the Museum of Fine Arts, where we enjoyed a lovely lunch and toured the visiting exhibit Make Way for Ducklings: The Art of Robert McCloskey. Afterward we were free to wander, and I came across this example of Dave the Potter’s work (it’s possible I was listening in to a docent).

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Elissa Gershowitz About Elissa Gershowitz

Elissa Gershowitz is executive editor of The Horn Book, Inc. She holds an MA from the Center for the Study of Children's Literature at Simmons College and a BA from Oberlin College.

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