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Weather and climate

de Seve, Karen  Little Kids First Big Book of Weather
Gr. K–3     128 pp.     National Geographic

A comprehensive, age-appropriate exploration of hot, cold, windy, cloudy, and rainy weather, with activities and games to reinforce the concepts at the conclusion of each chapter. An eclectic mix of appealing color photographs augments the text, and sidebars throughout ask questions encouraging readers to think and reflect. The information-packed volume includes appended tips for parents. Glos., ind.
Subjects: Earth Science; Weather

Felix, Rebecca  Hurricane Harvey: Disaster in Texas and Beyond
Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Millbrook

A slight overview of the destructive storm that devastated Houston and southeastern Texas in August 2017. Felix briefly discusses the nature of hurricanes; the storm’s course and immediate impact, including severe flooding, property damage, and trauma; and the disaster’s long-term effects. Color photographs aid in understanding the hurricane’s severity. “What You Can Do” and “Historic Hurricanes” spreads are appended. Reading list, websites. Glos., ind.
Subjects: North America; Natural disasters—Hurricanes; Houston (TX); Natural disasters—Floods; Rescue work; Survival; Weather—Storms; Disasters

Swanson, Jennifer  Geoengineering Earth’s Climate: Resetting the Thermostat
Middle school, high school     96 pp.     Twenty-First Century

This well-researched and clearly formatted book outlines some of the most modern theories and research about possible solutions to climate change. The narrative, supported by relevant photographs and diagrams, introduces the problem then organizes potential solutions by category, with explorations of pros and cons included. Inserts and sidebars provide additional facts on related topics. Reading list, websites. Bib., glos., ind.
Subjects: Pollution and Conservation; Engineering; Earth science; Climate change; Environment—Greenhouse effect

Teckentrup, Britta  Look at the Weather
Gr. 4–6     152 pp.     Owlkids

Adapted and translated by Shelley Tanaka. “We have such a strong connection to weather, we can’t help but wonder about it.” Teckentrup’s words and illustrations embody this connection, modeling curiosity and wonderment. Moody, textured images play with the relationships among art, nature, and light to explore the nuances of weather phenomena. The details encourage both careful, continuous observation and appreciation for the endless varieties of weather. Glos.
Subjects: Earth Science; Environment; Climate change; Weather; Books in translation

Zoehfeld, Kathleen Weidner  What Makes a Blizzard?
Gr. K–3     40 pp.     HarperCollins/Harper

Illustrated by Maddie Frost. Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out Science series. A legendary 1888 blizzard illustrates the power of winter storms and sets the context for explanations about atmospheric conditions that cause extreme weather as well as the physical science that leads to large amounts of precipitation and high winds. Friendly illustrations of families and animals in the snow are mainly decorative, though a few additional diagrams illustrate the science. Winter-weather journaling tips are included. Glos.
Subjects: Earth Science; Weather—Blizzards; Seasons—Winter

From the January 2019 issue of Nonfiction Notes from the Horn Book.

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