Related

Last 30 days
Last 6 months
Last 12 months
Last 24 months
Specific Dates
From:

To:
Specific Authors

When Aidan Became a Brother

Could it be? A book with a trans character whose queer identity is not the sole storyline? Well, almost. But still, here it is — and a possible contender for the Caldecott Medal to boot. When Aidan Became a Brother is the story of a soon-to-be older sibling and his anxieties...

My Papi Has a Motorcycle

1
Isabel Quintero and I have at least one thing in common. My Papi Has a Motorcycle, too, and although we used to ride on Sunday mornings instead of in the evenings, Quintero and I both know the bond-forming experience of a father sharing the road with his daughter. Quintero once again collaborates with...

The Undefeated

“This is for the unforgettable / The swift and sweet ones / who hurdled history / and opened a world / of possible.” From the opening lines of Kwame Alexander’s poem, readers are invited on a journey. It is a journey through a people’s story — through the sorrows, triumphs, and resilience...

The 2019 New York Times/New York Public Library Best Illustrated Children’s Books list

It's November, which means the annual announcement of the New York Times/New York Public Library Best Illustrated Children's Books list. At the end of October/beginning of November every year, I wake up each morning, wondering if today will be the day they make the announcement. (I know, I know. But if...

Bear Came Along

In her illustrator's note for the rollicking Bear Came Along, LeUyen Pham writes, "This book is truly special to me. It was one of those rare stories that, the moment I read it, I knew exactly how it would look." Her vibrant illustrations, done in watercolor, ink, and gouache, reflect...

The Fisherman and the Whale

It seems many book creators of late are fascinated — and justifiably concerned — by increasingly frequent news about injured, captive, and entangled whales. This has resulted in a wealth of gorgeously illustrated books featuring observant, empathetic child characters who, in various ways, perform acts of environmental stewardship. Think Troy Howell and Richard...

Two Brothers, Four Hands

1
Biographies by Jan Greenberg and Sandra Jordan are among my favorite nonfiction books. Action Jackson; Ballet for Martha; Chuck Close, Up Close; and Christo and Jeanne-Claude: Through the Gates and Beyond, among others, are models of fine writing and creative presentations. And I loved Hadley Hooper’s illustrations for Patricia MacLachlan’s...

The Bell Rang

1
Any time I have heard an African American person speak of learning about slavery as a child, the memory entails some degree of shame. In his memoir Bad Boy, Walter Dean Myers wrote about feeling, as a child looking at his textbook’s shallow treatment of slavery, that somehow those people...

The Caldecott Torch

2
Calling Caldecott readers may remember this September post in which Caldecott medalist Sophie Blackall mentioned how she and fellow medalist Matthew Cordell (the two most recent winners) recently brainstormed a new Caldecott tradition. Sophie's fab idea, which she suggested as she chatted with Matt at this year's ALA Annual conference, was...

The Little Guys

3
In Leave Me Alone!, a 2017 Caldecott Honor book, Vera Brosgol gave us a grouchy grandma who just wants to be left TF alone. In The Little Guys, we meet a pack of admittedly adorable underdogs, working ably together to better themselves and all others within the group — but acting like a bunch...

CaldeComics 2020

Another year, another opportunity for graphic novels to make their way into Caldecott discussions. If, as Travis Jonker writes, wordless books are “Caldecott catnip,” then what does that make graphic novels? “Graphic elements” in picture books certainly seem to be an enticing treat (see: Mr. Wuffles!, A Different Pond, Creepy...

Another

My sister, a high school English teacher, is one of the most well-read and story-loving persons on the planet. She reads voraciously, indiscriminately, and deeply. When she presses a book into my hands, I know it will demand focused and thoughtful reading. This was the case with Joseph Campbell’s The...

Going Down Home with Daddy

1
Going Down Home with Daddy's back cover boldly announces, “Nothing is more important than family.” It's a palpable sentiment throughout the story. A Black family of four wakes before dawn to pack the car for a trip “down home” to Daddy’s family reunion, an event they surely attend regularly. During the drive,...

Hey, Water!

Forgive me, dear readers, but I’m sort of cheating. I’m writing about Antoinette Portis’s Hey, Water! here at Calling Caldecott when, earlier this year, I reviewed it for the Horn Book Magazine. I’m going to embrace this, though, by leaning into my review and reiterating here the many things I like...

What Never Wins?

Travis Jonker's Calling Caldecott post about wordless books being "catnip" for Caldecott committees, and he's making me wonder again about what picture-book subgenres have never figured in the medals. Like: board books, pop-up books, books illustrated with photographs. Anything else?...

Gittel's Journey

1
Gittel’s Journey — and thus, Gittel’s journey — feels vast. The trim size is on the generous side, with a dust jacket that shows our young protagonist against a backdrop of ocean and the faraway Statue of Liberty and, on the back, shows her amidst a large crowd of people disembarking from...

Field Trip to the Moon

3
Look, I could beat around the bush, but I’m just going to tell you straight: nothing gets the attention of the Caldecott committee like a wordless book. Wordless is Caldecott catnip. “Yeah, yeah, Travis, what do you know?” Well, I know that my 2014 committee gave Honors to not one but...

What Is Given from the Heart

2
In this posthumous offering from author Patricia C. McKissack, young James Otis and his mother are experiencing hard times: James Otis's father has died; they have lost their farm; their rundown new house floods; James Otis's dog disappears. The two things they have been able to hold onto are their faith and each other. In...

Mordicai Gerstein: A Tribute

3
We here at Calling Caldecott are sad to have read the news about the death of Mordicai Gerstein, who wrote and illustrated children’s books for nearly five decades. I first heard about his death on Tuesday when Richard Michelson of R. Michelson Galleries in Northampton, Massachusetts, shared the news of his...

Sea Bear

1
I typically shy away from books that carry any sort of “message.” The heavy hand of adulthood often lands a little too hard for my taste, replacing narrative and beauty with “You get it now, right?” Not so in Lindsay Moore’s nonfiction picture book Sea Bear: A Journey for Survival. In...

My Heart

6
I’ve been diving into social-emotional books this year for a number of reasons, so I was interested in My Heart and saw it fairly soon after it was published. It struck me as a book that was going to challenge any ideas we might have about how a book about feelings should...

CaldeGeisel 2020

1
Last year the Guessing Geisel co-host team was thrilled to make a visit to Calling Caldecott to discuss the crossover appeal of Emily Tetri’s Tiger vs. Nightmare. Although the title didn’t quite snag a crossover win, it did take home a Geisel Honor. Not too shabby! This year we’re once again...

A Conversation with Sophie Blackall

3
Sophie Blackall is the author-illustrator of Hello Lighthouse, winner of the 2019 Randolph Caldecott Medal. Julie Danielson interviewed her by email for Calling Caldecott.   Calling Caldecott: Last year, we asked the Caldecott Medalist where he keeps his medal (it is beside his daughter's Ren Faire fist, no less), but where...

Let's Dive In: The List Is Here

6
We're here today with our list of 2020 Caldecott-eligible books. We’ve asked the books (and our guest bloggers) to don some scuba gear, because we’re going to take some deep dives here at the blog — humor me with my weak aquatic metaphor; I’m only on my first cup of...

It's That Time of Year Again

7
Well, hello there! We here at Calling Caldecott are waving in your direction (which is to say many directions), welcoming fall — here in the South, anyway, we finally have a subtle chill in the air — and welcoming back our readers for a new season of looking at outstanding...

Spring Picture Books on the Radar

6
Why, hello there! We are running our fingers through a few months’ worth of cyber-dust here at the Calling Caldecott blog, given that our last post was in January.Have you been reading picture books in 2019? You can trust that we have, and we thought it would be a good...

The 2019 Robin Smith Picture Book Prize

19
Perched on her rocking chair (brightly painted by her students with Alabama outsider artist Chris Clark), teacher Robin Smith would launch with glee and gusto into a beloved picture book, her second graders in a semicircle at her feet. Every day for 24 years she would read to her students...

The Official 2019 Caldecott Winners

8
The day has come! The 2019 Caldecott Medal Selection Committee has made its choices.The winner is:Hello Lighthouse, written and illustrated by Sophie Blackall. (This is her second Caldecott Medal — Finding Winnie won in 2016).The honor books are:Alma and How She Got Her Name, written and illustrated by Juana Martinez-NealThe Rough...

Calling Caldecott: Not a Crystal Ball

We mentioned this in yesterday's post, but it's worth repeating: our mock vote yesterday was really close! WOWZERS. (You can head here to see the results if you haven't seen the numbers yet.) As we watched the results come in yesterday, we were oohing and aahing over how close it...

And the winner of the 2019 Calling Caldecott mock vote is…

11
…Yuyi Morales's DreamersCongratulations to Yuyi Morales for winning the mock vote here at Calling Caldecott!It's been a bit of a wild ride, though. If you look at the full results of our vote, you'll see that this was almost too close to call:1st choice(4 points)2nd choice(3 points)3rd choice(2 points)Total pointsA...

Calling Caldecott 2019 ballot #2 now open

We are almost finished! Our second ballot starts now and will be open until 9 a.m. EST tomorrow (Thursday, January 24), and we will announce the winner of our mock vote in the afternoon.In less than a week! — Monday, January 28! — we will find out which books will receive recognition from the Real Caldecott...

Calling Caldecott 2019 ballot #1 results

6
The first round of voting is complete! Thanks to everyone who weighed in.As regular Calling Caldecott readers know — but it bears repeating for new folks — the real Caldecott Committee is required to vote for three books on each ballot, specifying 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place. When the votes...

Calling Caldecott 2019 ballot #1 is open

10
Here is a link to the 2019 Calling Caldecott ballot. It will be open until 9 a.m. (EST) Tuesday, January 22. Sometime that afternoon, we will post the results and a link to the second ballot. [Note: because Monday is a federal holiday, we decided to let voting continue until...

2019 Calling Caldecott ballot #1 and voting instructions

7
It's time for the 2019 mock vote here at Calling Caldecott! We have been discussing books here at the blog as far back as early March, and we hope you all have been reading and thinking and poring over books. The actual ALA Youth Media Awards will be in less...

Our Picture Book Year

10
Jules: So, we here at Calling Caldecott have wrapped up our book coverage, and it's almost time for the mock vote. (More on that tomorrow!) But before that happens we thought we'd have a brief discussion about the year. No predictions here, because no one has a crystal ball. But we...

A Parade of Elephants

2
This year on Calling Caldecott we’ve had an impassioned plea for Caldecott recognition for board books. The title under discussion today isn’t a board book (well, not yet). But it’s for the same audience, and I’m about to make an impassioned plea for its recognition.Kevin Henkes’s A Parade of Elephants is both...

The Stuff of Stars

2
While on a recent drive across the state, I was listening to National Public Radio's Here and Now as correspondent Robin Young consulted with her high school choir director, Ron Cohen, about the composition of Handel's Messiah. During the conversation, Mr. Cohen described the technique that Handel employed to illuminate...

Stop That Yawn!

6
This is not a bedtime story. On the cover are yawning people and animals — they’re already half asleep! — but in the middle of them all is a little girl and her cat, and they’re wide awake. The girl has brown skin and locs, and everything about her, from...

2019 CaldeNotts

4
I love following along here at Calling Caldecott, reading posts and comments from extraordinarily astute and observant picture book evaluators and measuring the books in question according to their insights, whether or not they line up with mine. Indeed, perhaps the most gratifying function of a blog like this, for...

Undocumented

2
Undocumented: A Worker’s Fight by Duncan Tonatiuh follows a fictional man named Juan who emigrates from Mexico to the United States. As an undocumented restaurant worker, he is terribly exploited; a waitress, herself an immigrant from China, recruits Juan to help organize their colleagues, and they courageously file a legal...

A Home in the Barn

4
Could Jerry Pinkney bring home Caldecott gold once again with his illustrations for A Home in the Barn? I don’t have a crystal ball, and even Santa (who knows everything) won’t tell me. But I do love this book. As we’ve seen, there are many stellar picture books this year....

CaldeGeisel 2019

2
We here at Calling Caldecott are happy to welcome back the three librarians who run the show over at Guessing Geisel, the blog that celebrates beginning readers and annually runs a mock vote for the Geisel Award. Amy Seto Forrester, Amanda Foulk, and Misti Tidman visited last year, and today they are back...

CaldeComics, Part Two

3
Today on Calling Caldecott, Alec Chunn writes about three 2018 graphic novels. This follows his October post, in which he wrote about three others. If you missed part one, it's here. — J.D.Though Elisa Gall and Jonathan Hunt made a pretty solid case for board books being recognized by the Caldecott...

Imagine!

1
Raúl Colón's wordless Imagine! might be the most joyous picture book of the year.This inspirational companion to Draw! (2014), Colón's autobiographical story about a bedridden boy who becomes immersed in the safari drawings he creates, explodes with energy as a young man skateboards through New York City streets, over a bridge, and to the Museum of...

The Wall in the Middle of the Book

3
Jon Agee is a brilliant picture book creator — who has never won a Caldecott. In this year of breathtaking contenders, it might seem a stretch to suggest that his The Wall in the Middle of the Book could put him over the top (that's a little joke for those of you who already know this clever and surprise-twisty title)....

Otis and Will Discover the Deep

1
I remember my father’s story of when, as a teenager on Staten Island, he built a diving apparatus — a diving helmet — to enable him to descend into watery depths and explore the world below. My father is gone now and with him the details of how he created it —...

Adrian Simcox Does NOT Have a Horse

15
The eponymous Adrian Simcox in Marcy Campbell's debut picture book Adrian Simcox Does NOT Have a Horse is bullied because of his poverty. Some have likened this book to Eleanor Estes's classic chapter book The Hundred Dresses. I know many readers regard Dresses as a text that fosters empathy, but I can’t...

Dreamers

8
Martha referred to 2018 (back in this post) as a “year of blockbusters,” and Yuyi Morales’s Dreamers may be the biggest blockbuster of them all. It’s a picture book that has gotten a lot of attention and adoration this year (one professional review calls it nothing less than a “masterpiece”)...

The Day You Begin

8
When you feel different, the world around you can tell. It shows in the fear on your face, the slump in your shoulders, the distance between you and others in your class. And the children around you will remind you how different you are with their side-eye glances and low...

Pie Is for Sharing

1
Stephanie Parsley Ledyard and Jason Chin's Pie Is for Sharing does that thing picture books are supposed to do — text and art work interdependently. Ledyard's rather philosophical text (an extended musing on the nature of sharing) is given a specific setting (a lakeside, summertime, community picnic) in Chin's detailed watercolor and gouache illustrations;...

Thank You, Omu!

3
We sometimes think of collage as an art form that we learned in elementary school — cut or torn pieces of paper, pictures from magazines, newspapers, etc., all pasted together to convey a message or paint a picture. Few of us have ever used collage to tell an entire story,...

A Big Mooncake for Little Star

2
Jules got to write the Magazine review for this book, so I need to thank her for letting me take it on for Calling Caldecott. It has been on my top five list since I first saw it in the Horn Book office. It's the story of Little Star, who...

Nothing Stopped Sophie

5
Nothing Stopped Sophie: The Story of Unshakable Mathematician Sophie Germain (written by Cheryl Bardoe) is the story of the groundbreaking self-taught mathematician and physics pioneer Sophie Germain, whose work on the concept of vibration patterns made her the first woman to win a grand prize from France’s distinguished Royal Academy...

Blue

3
Texture and depth pulled me into Laura Vaccaro Seeger's Blue, and texture and depth are what carried me through (and then back to the beginning, and then through again). Picking it up for the first time, my immediate instinct was to manipulate the book — to feel its weight, to...

The 2018 New York Times/New York Public Library Best Illustrated Children’s Books list

1
Did you all see on Friday the 2018 New York Times/New York Public Library Best Illustrated Children’s Books list? I've said this before, but the announcement of this award, along with the return to hot cocoa and turning the clocks back an hour, is one of my favorite things about...

We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga

3
As we watch the news and scroll through social media, it seems like everyone has an opinion on what it means to be indigenous, but the voices shouting loudest and being heard the clearest are not indigenous voices.How do we share with children what it means to be a contemporary...

Drawn Together

3
I was instantly intrigued when illustrator Dan Santat described on social media how he developed the display type for Drawn Together, writing, “It originates from the original Thai alphabet. Then I integrated Western alphabet components into the design to show a melding of cultures. Lastly, for design reasons, I modified...

Water Land: Land and Water Forms Around the World

1
I saw the cover and a single preview page of Christy Hale’s Water Land online and thought gleefully (and a little smugly) to myself that Hale probably had no idea she’d put together a perfect Montessori picture book. It’s just like our Water and Land Forms! Simple! Elegant! Clean! If only she...

Hawk Rising

3
If the flight of a hawk is poetry in motion, then this book is, too. Author Maria Gianferrari provides the poetry, and illustrator Brian Floca provides the hawk in motion. Parallel stories are at work here: Father Hawk hunts, while Mother Hawk stays with their chicks; a human girl, binoculars...

They Say Blue

6
Have you noticed? This is a powerhouse year for the Caldecott. We are seeing so many spectacular books worthy of Caldecott recognition — and many are illustrated by women. Jillian Tamaki's They Say Blue is one of those extraordinary picture books.Although we know Tamaki's work from of the Caldecott Honor-winning graphic novel This One Summer, They Say Blue is...

The View from Robin's Rocking Chair

13
Robin Smith, my wife, co-founded Calling Caldecott, and when she died last year, I knew that each fall would have me wondering which current picture books Robin would love most. The way I decide is to think of Robin’s rocking chair, painted in vivid reds and yellows and greens by...

Julián Is a Mermaid

2
If the Caldecott Medal is for a book that, among its other qualities, “provides children with an essentially visual experience,” then I hope the 2019 Caldecott Committee is taking a good long look at Julián Is a Mermaid, written and illustrated by Jessica Love. With a text just shy of ninety...

A House That Once Was

5
How do you feel when a multi–Caldecott Honor winner creates a Caldecott-worthy book? Personally, I go through a series of different stages. You know. Denial. Morbid curiosity. Conversion. Proselytizing. At least that’s what happened when I took a deep dive into A House That Once Was by Julie Fogliano, illustrated...

Hello Lighthouse

5
I like to believe that over ten years of reading books aloud to children has provided me with a strong sense of the ones that will capture not just their attention but also (and perhaps more importantly) their hearts and minds. The books they beg me to read again and...

Fox + Chick: The Party and Other Stories

5
I have a deep love for art that is excellent without being showy, and so I find myself in love with Sergio Ruzzier’s Fox + Chick: The Party and Other Stories. The Caldecott criteria include providing a child with a primarily visual experience, and here it is. Even children who can’t...

Martin Rising

2
This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. While we normally see, on an annual basis, a new crop of picture books about the legendary civil rights leader, there seem to be even more this year in an effort to mark this somber...

CaldeComics, Part One

Today on Calling Caldecott, Alec Chunn writes about three 2018 graphic novels. He will contribute a second graphic novel round-up post later this year. —J.D.Jillian and Mariko Tamaki’s This One Summer was (controversially) chosen as a 2015 Caldecott Honor book. A graphic novel hasn’t received recognition since, though Thi Bui and...

Alma and How She Got Her Name

3
The first time I saw Juana Martinez-Neal's Alma and How She Got Her Name was as a thumbnail image on a website alongside scores of other books. Even in low-resolution, postage-stamp size, I felt its softness and personalness, and I wanted to reach in and hold it. The cover — featuring Alma’s...

The Field

4
When I was about four years old, my parents signed me up for a kids’ soccer program. All I remember is feeling terrified when it was my turn to be goalie — and somehow convincing the coach to let my best friend stay in the goal with me. Suffice it...

All A-Board: Why the Hell Hasn't a Board Book Won the Caldecott!?

9
Today on Calling Caldecott, a conversation between Elisa Gall and Jonathan Hunt about board books and the Caldecott Award. (If you missed it, last year they asked a similar question: Why the hell hasn't photography won the Caldecott?!?) —J.D.ELISA GALL: Thanks to Allison Kaplan's 2012 Children and Libraries article "From Board to...

Hello Hello

3
No illustrator creates animals the way Brendan Wenzel does. Once readers see a cat or a parrot or a tiger rendered in his distinct style, they may never look at the creature the same way again. And it all starts with those eyes. I call them Wenzelian eyes. The googly...

This Is the Nest that Robin Built

1
Denise Fleming loves bright colors and texture, and this book's palette is all about springtime, with all its yellow-greens and blues setting off the warm browns and reds of the foreground figures. She has moved away from her signature paper pulp painting technique this time, instead printing her colors onto...

Seeing Into Tomorrow

6
Seeing Into Tomorrow is a marriage of two unique talents of different eras: the text is by Richard Wright, author of Native Son (1940) and Black Boy (1945); the art is by Nina Crews, known for her picture books pairing texts with photographic collage and featuring diverse children. In this latest work, Crews has...

Libba: The Magnificent Musical Life of Elizabeth Cotten

9
Our first book post this Calling Caldecott season is Libba, a picture-book biography of African American folk musician Elizabeth Cotten, written by Laura Veirs and illustrated by Tatyana Fazlalizadeh. The flap copy refers to the book's artist as a "debut illustrator." Technically, that's true—this is Fazlalizadeh's first picture book—but of course she...

Kidlitwomen*: A Conversation with Karen Blumenthal

3
Following her interview with last year's Caldecott winner, Matthew Cordell, Julie Danielson interviewed author Karen Blumenthal by email for Calling Caldecott to discuss Kidlitwomen*, which Karen co-founded with author-illustrator Grace Lin.Calling Caldecott: Tell us about the origins of Kidlitwomen*. For those not familiar with the project, can you talk about when and...

A Conversation with Matthew Cordell

2
Matthew Cordell is the author-illustrator of Wolf in the Snow, winner of the 2018 Randolph Caldecott Medal. Julie Danielson interviewed him by email for Calling Caldecott.Calling Caldecott: Hi, Matt! Before we kick off the new Caldecott season in earnest, we thought it'd be fun to have a brief chat (a Matt-chat, if...

And we're off!

22
Hello again! If you saw Tuesday's post from earlier this week, during which we officially kicked things off, you know that we are back today to bring you all a list of books we plan to cover this Calling Caldecott season.Below is that preliminary list of eligible books we hope...

It's already September?!? Welcome back!

2
Crisp breezes in the air. The changing color of leaves. Decorative gourds (if that’s your thing). Pumpkin-spice lattes (ditto). That’s right, you all: autumn is almost here. Geese will head south, squirrels will bulk up, and you may already be pondering what your Halloween costume will be. Our favorite thing...

June Picture Books on the Radar

2
Happy June, everyone! We hope you're all staying cool and are lucky enough to have at least a little bit of down time this summer. We are here to check in, as we've been doing all of this year, to see what’s being published this month and what looks intriguing....

May Picture Books on the Radar

7
Happy May, everyone! Is it just us or does the year feel like it's flying by? Pretty soon, we'll be at the midway mark of 2018. Before we get there, let's check in, as we've been doing all of this year, to see what’s being published this month and what...

April Picture Books on the Radar

7
Happy April, everyone! Spring has officially sprung, even if you happen to live in a part of the country still seeing snow. (If that describes where you live but you're ready for spring, I won't mention the temperatures in Nashville right about now.)If you saw our last post here at...

Taking a Peek at 2018 . . .

12
Have you had a chance to catch your breath since the announcement of the 2018 Caldecott winners? Speaking of which, I highly recommend this video that newly minted Caldecott Medalist Matthew Cordell released, thanking the Real Committee. (Hoooowl!)The first part of the year feels like it’s flown by, hasn’t it? It is already...

The 2018 Robin Smith Picture Book Prize

16
We here at Calling Caldecott think often of Robin Smith — beloved second-grade teacher, reviewer, and enthusiastic co-author of this blog before her untimely death last June. Her passion for and astute observations of picture books infuse the work we continue to do here, every day. Every. Single. Day. We wanted to do something special to...

The 2018 Caldecott Winners

7
How is everybody doing this morning? Whew. Exciting day, right? Here's a zippy-quick post to note that this morning the winners of the 2018 ALA Youth Media Awards were announced. And we here at Calling Caldecott were most eager, of course, to find out which books the Caldecott committee chose....

And the winner of the 2018 Calling Caldecott mock vote is...

7
. . . Dan Santat's After the Fall (How Humpty Dumpty Got Back Up Again)After the Fall received a whopping 456 total points, garnering 77 first-place votes. And for our purposes, making it the clear winner.(How would that translate to numbers on an actual Caldecott committee ballot? As decisive as the numbers look...

Calling Caldecott 2018 ballot #2 now open

Here at Calling Caldecott, we are almost finished. Our second ballot will be open until 9 a.m. EST tomorrow (Wednesday, 2/7), and we will announce our mock winner tomorrow around noon.In less than a week, we will also find out which books will receive recognition from the real Caldecott committee. But right...

Calling Caldecott 2018 ballot #1 results

The three of us watched the voting in real time Friday and over the weekend, and we woke up early today to check numbers before the balloting closed at 9 a.m. This is a really exciting time for us, but it can also be heartbreaking to see some of our favorites not...

Calling Caldecott 2018 ballot #1 now open

2
Here is a link to the 2018 Calling Caldecott ballot. It will be open until 9 a.m. (EST) Monday, February 5. Sometime that afternoon, we will post the results and a link to the second ballot.Go ahead and lobby for your favorites in the comments here. Or mourn for the...

2018 Calling Caldecott ballot #1 and voting instructions

9
 Drumroll, everyone. We are very close to the 2018 ALA Youth Media Awards announcements (Monday, February 12), during which we will find out the names of the books that impressed the 2018 Caldecott committee. This is one of those years where I've heard many people say, "My favorites change daily!" and "How...

Her Right Foot

4
Dave Eggers’s Her Right Foot, illustrated by debut artist Shawn Harris and clocking in at over a hundred pages, is a picture book receiving a fair amount of Newbery buzz. Heavy Medal, School Library Journal’s mock Newbery blog, has placed the book on their long list. In two separate posts they, and...

Tell us about your mock Caldecott results

19
Three mock Caldecott groups meeting at Harvard Graduate School of Education in fall 2017.Every year we like to solicit responses from anyone who has held a mock Caldecott with their students, library patrons, or bookstore customers. The first few years of Calling Caldecott, I was in awe of Robin Smith's...

Before She Was Harriet

6
I wrote this elsewhere last year, but I’ll say it again here: I think this is one of the best books by husband-and-wife author-illustrator team Lesa Cline-Ransome and James E. Ransome, who have collaborated on some fifteen picture books thus far in their careers.This spare biography of Harriet Tubman, “a wisp of...

The Wolf, the Duck, and the Mouse

6
Last Friday, the team from the Guessing Geisel blog dropped by to discuss some 2017 picture books with possible crossover Geisel and Caldecott appeal. One of the titles was Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen's Triangle. But today we're here to discuss Barnett and Klassen's other 2017 picture book, The Wolf,...

CaldeGeisel 2018

We here at Calling Caldecott thought it would be fun to have a visit today from the three librarians who run the show over at Guessing Geisel, the blog that celebrates beginning readers and annually runs a mock vote for the Geisel Award (just as we will soon have a...

Dazzle Ships

2
A nonfiction picture book from a small publisher does not necessarily scream CALDECOTT, but even from across the room, one look at the cover of Chris Barton and Victo Ngai’s Dazzle Ships: World War I and the Art of Confusion would likely make you reconsider.The story of these wildly patterned WWI...

Windows

10
Would it be cheating if, for just a moment, I sent you to Martha’s review of Julia Denos’s Windows, illustrated by debut artist E. B. Goodale? Martha nails a lot of what I like about this story of a brown-skinned boy’s stroll through his diverse neighborhood, as he describes what...

Rivers of Sunlight

3
For the third time since Calling Caldecott started, I get to talk about a new book in the Sunlight Series. I hope you all know these books. The first (My Light, 2004) was by Molly Bang alone. For 2009's Living Sunlight and the following three books, Bang shared writing credit...

Five questions for Julie Danielson of Calling Caldecott

7
In 2017, Calling Caldecott welcomed Julie Danielson to the team. Along with Martha Parravano and Lolly Robinson, Jules — author of the Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast blog — stays up-to-date on the 2018 Caldecott contenders, offering entertaining observations and useful insight into the awards selection process.1. How has your...

Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut

2
Crown, illustrated by Gordon C. James, is a fresh cut, indeed. It finally brings us a new book (and the first picture book) from Derrick Barnes, an author of both young adult books and early readers. The title of the book plays on the old adage that a woman’s hair...

The Antlered Ship

3
The Fan Brothers live in Canada. Are they eligible for the Caldecott? That question has come up on many discussion boards about Caldecott contenders. And the answer is yes. According to the Caldecott criteria, “The award is restricted to artists who are citizens or residents of the United States.” Although...
articles

Stay Connected. Join our devoted community of librarians, educators, and parents in the world of children’s and young adult literature.