Subscribe to The Horn Book

CaldeGeisel 2018

We here at Calling Caldecott thought it would be fun to have a visit today from the three librarians who run the show over at Guessing Geisel, the blog that celebrates beginning readers and annually runs a mock vote for the Geisel Award (just as we will soon have a mock Caldecott vote here). Amy, […]

Dazzle Ships

A nonfiction picture book from a small publisher does not necessarily scream CALDECOTT, but even from across the room, one look at the cover of Chris Barton and Victo Ngai’s Dazzle Ships: World War I and the Art of Confusion would likely make you reconsider. The story of these wildly patterned WWI battleships, camouflaged in order […]

Windows

Would it be cheating if, for just a moment, I sent you to Martha’s review of Julia Denos’s Windows, illustrated by debut artist E. B. Goodale? Martha nails a lot of what I like about this story of a brown-skinned boy’s stroll through his diverse neighborhood, as he describes what he sees when the windows […]

Rivers of Sunlight

For the third time since Calling Caldecott started, I get to talk about a new book in the Sunlight Series. I hope you all know these books. The first (My Light, 2004) was by Molly Bang alone. For 2009’s Living Sunlight and the following three books, Bang shared writing credit with Penny Chisholm, bringing out […]

Five questions for Julie Danielson of Calling Caldecott

In 2017, Calling Caldecott welcomed Julie Danielson to the team. Along with Martha Parravano and Lolly Robinson, Jules — author of the Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast blog — stays up-to-date on the 2018 Caldecott contenders, offering entertaining observations and useful insight into the awards selection process. 1. How has your first year of Calling […]

Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut

Crown, illustrated by Gordon C. James, is a fresh cut, indeed. It finally brings us a new book (and the first picture book) from Derrick Barnes, an author of both young adult books and early readers. The title of the book plays on the old adage that a woman’s hair is her crown. As indicated […]

The Antlered Ship

The Fan Brothers live in Canada. Are they eligible for the Caldecott? That question has come up on many discussion boards about Caldecott contenders. And the answer is yes. According to the Caldecott criteria, “The award is restricted to artists who are citizens or residents of the United States.” Although they reside in Toronto, Terry […]

Silent Days, Silent Dreams

Like many of you, I reckon, I did not know about artist James Castle until I read Silent Days, Silent Dreams by Allen Say. Castle is described as deaf, mute, autistic, and probably dyslexic, yet for over 70 years he created a staggering range of stunningly original folk art objects. In this fictionalized, biographical treatment […]

How to Be an Elephant

I find it interesting how much I tend to admire nonfiction picture books these days. As a child, that wasn’t the case at all, but then information books have come a long way in the past fifty years. We used to talk on this blog about how difficult it was for information books to win […]

Big Machines

Each fall, as award season heats up and the Interwebs start buzzing with kid-book love, we all should revisit Vicky Smith’s “Reader, Know Thyself.” Originally posted at Heavy Medal in September 2013, Vicky’s essay encourages readers to understand and respect their genre preferences in the context of award consideration: “Are you, as a friend of mine is, […]