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The Star’s Guide to Writing for Children — page 10

< Previous page | Next page > 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12 From the May/June 2004 Horn Book Magazine.

The Star’s Guide to Writing for Children — page 11

< Previous page | Next page > 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12 From the May/June 2004 Horn Book Magazine.

The Star’s Guide to Writing for Children — page 12

< Previous page 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12 From the May/June 2004 Horn Book Magazine.

On Spies and Purple Socks and Such

If you were a queer kid like me growing up in the sixties, I hope you were fortunate enough to come across books by Louise Fitzhugh. She may have saved your life, or at least made it a bit more comfortable. When I was eleven, I didn’t know I was gay; I only knew that […]

The Sand in the Oyster: Looking for YA Lit

The Kerlan. A name invoked in hushed tones by devotees of children’s literature. A sort of heaven where manuscripts of the books we love go to be preserved forever. A collection of 100,000 books, as well as 16,000 files of holographs, typescripts, page proofs, artwork, editorial letters, and other assorted contents of authors’ office closets. […]

Purposeful Poetry

“I need a poem to go with a unit on diseases.” “I need a poem about respecting other people’s property.” “I need a poem for a lesson I’m doing on invertebrates.” “Where are your poetry books about personal hygiene?” Upon hearing such requests posed by education students and teachers, a librarian’s first thought might be, […]

Sydney Taylor: A Centenary Celebration

Within the last few years, Julia Child died at the age of ninety-one; Katharine Hepburn at ninety-six; Bob Hope at one hundred. As we watched the retrospectives of their lives promulgated through media tributes, we also saw histories of the twentieth century. Each of these famous Americans offered a life story that is also a […]

The Outsiders, Fat Freddy, and Me

Incredible as it sounds, at least to me, I have been involved with young adult literature for thirty-three years now, which makes me and the genre almost exact contemporaries. It began in 1967–68, and I began working with it in 1970. This entitles me, I suppose, to call myself a YA matriarch — or at […]

An Interview with Russell Freedman

Russell Freedman has illuminated the crossroads of the biographical and the historical in more than forty nonfiction books for young people. He spoke with Roger Sutton last June in New York City. ROGER SUTTON: For this special issue we asked a number of writers to give us the unanswered question from history that most nags […]

On the Cover: Houses

My father’s house was made of sky. His bookcases stood twelve feet high. The snowy owl my father tamed, the stones he showed me, stars he named, agate, quartz, the Milky Way— “It’s good to know their names,” he’d say, “so when I’m gone and you are grown, in any world you’ll feel at home.” […]