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From Caldecott to Caldecott

by Helen Adams Masten It has been only seven years since Marcia Brown won the Caldecott medal for her Cinderella. Comparing the exquisite little gouache drawings for Cinderella with the strong and rhythmically beautiful woodcuts for Once a Mouse…, one realizes that this artist has come a long way in seven years. An artist grows […]

Distinction in Picture Books

by Marcia Brown Editor’s Note: Although addressed to librarians, Miss Brown’s paper speaks equally to parents. What is a distinguished picture book? With the changes that have come about in publishing in the last few years, the fate of the picture book lies squarely in the hands of librarians. Today it takes real courage for […]

Caldecott Award Acceptance*

by Marcia Brown *Paper read at the meeting of the American Library Association, Philadelphia, July 5, 1955. An artist cannot help feeling deeply honored to receive an award bearing the name of Randolph Caldecott, one of the happiest spirits in children’s books. Prizes and awards seem to be gifts from the gods, unless they are […]

Marcia Brown and Her Books

by Alice Dalgliesh The three little Brown girls, Helen, Janet and Marcia, lived for several years in a parsonage in Cooperstown, New York. It was a delightful place to spend one’s childhood, for there was Otsego Lake with woodland paths to be explored and, best of all, Natty Bumppo’s cave. The girls had a good […]

Marcia Brown letter to Bertha Mahony Miller (undated)

To Bertha E. Miller, for some time “Early one morning in the spring”, with very much appreciation. Marcia Brown Dear Mrs. Miller I want to tell you how much I enjoyed meeting you and how much it meant to me to hear your speech recalling Elizabeth Miller, Mukeiji, and the others, whom I had known […]

Review of Picture This

Picture This: Perception and Composition by Molly Bang; illus. by the author Intermediate     Bulfinch/Little     141 pp. 9/91     Paper ed. 0-8212-1855-7     $12.95 With a forward by Rudolf Arnheim. If I could buy only one book this year, this would be the one. If I could take only one book on a long cavation, this would be […]

An Interview with Frances Foster

In the September/October 2003 Horn Book Magazine, Leonard S. Marcus interviewed longtime editor Frances Foster, head of Frances Foster Books, an imprint of Farrar, Straus & Giroux.  Leonard S. Marcus: How did you come to be a children’s book editor? Frances Foster: I came to New York on the rebound, following a wonderful but unreal […]

A Tale of Washington’s Irvin

By Peggy Sullivan A three-story red brick house in midtown Washington serves as way-station to a collection of first editions of children’s books, manuscripts, illustrations, and many other related items. All these materials are forwarded in time to the University of Minnesota. Here they become a part of the Kerlan Collection, housed in its own […]

On Spies and Applesauce and Such

The arrival of Harriet the Spy with fanfare and announcements of approval for its “realism” makes me wonder again why that word is invariably applied to stories about disagreeable people and situations. Are there really no amiable children? No loyal friends? No parents who are fundamentally loving and understanding? I challenge the implication that New […]

A Second Look: Harriet the Spy

Harriet the Spy was published in 1964. That was the year I read it twelve times. That was the year our school bookstore kept running out of green composition notebooks, and the cafeteria was plagued with requests for tomato sandwiches. A memorable year for many of us. Now, sixteen years later, I take a closer […]