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>Sitting at the grownups table

>Over at Nonfiction Matters, Marc Aronson cautions us to think about the larger context in which debates about social responsibility and the Newbery take place: “What I’d like is a set of comments on the Newbery that is not drawn from a survey of four winners, or the latest demographic chart, but a wider sense […]

Horn Book Reminiscence from Lillian N. Gerhardt

From Lillian N. Gerhardt The Horn Book was just ending the celebration of its first forty years of publication when I went to work for the advance review agency Kirkus Review Service. Its founder, Virginia Kirkus, was seventy years old and still an active presence on the staff. Unlike most who reach that age, Kirkus was disinclined […]

A Letter to Lillian N. Gerhardt

Ethel Heins’s response to Lillian N. Gerhardt’s “A Letter to Ethel Heins.” From School Library Journal, Nov. 1975. © 1975 R. R. Bowker Company / A Xerox Corporation. Used with permission.   By Ethel L. Heins I have read your lengthy editorial letter to me (SLJ, September) and find it difficult to believe that my […]

A Letter to Ethel Heins

A response to Ethel Heins’s editorial, “Damming the Mainstream.” From School Library Journal, Sept. 1975. © 1975 R. R. Bowker Company / A Xerox Corporation. Used with permission. By Lillian N. Gerhardt Dear Ethel: The August, 1975 issue of The Horn Book Magazine just arrived. I read your editorial right away because I think it’s […]

Damming the Mainstream

Reponse to “An Argument Worth Opening” by Lillian N. Gerhardt, editor of School Library Journal Editorial by Ethel Heins When I was invited to be a speaker at a spring conference on “Children’s Literature in the Literary Mainstream” sponsored by the Western Michigan University School of Librarianship, I thought — as I often have — […]

An Argument Worth Opening

From School Library Journal, May 1974. © 1974 R. R. Bowker Company/A Xerox Corporation. Reprinted with permission. By Lillian N. Gerhardt Innumerable commentators on children’s books plug the idea that children’s books are part of “…the mainstream of American literature.” The authors, illustrators, publishers, reviewers, and librarians who have employed or applauded that self-congratulatory tag […]